digs 05-20-10

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DEVELOPMENT DIGS is a supplemental publication of The Villager Newspaper. Produced twice a month, this new section will feature stories about home improvement and décor, lawn/garden care and landscaping. DIGS will also focus on real estate – supplying real estate agents and brokers with a platform to highlight their properties, expertise and services. NEXT EDITION: JUNE 3 AD DEADLINE: MAY 27 di g s THE VILLAGER NEWSPAPER MAY 20, 2010 REAL ESTATE HOME & GARDEN DEVELOPMENT di g s HOME & GARDEN REAL ESTATE what’s inside Historic Bemis house gets renewed life, Pg. 23 Smart new supermarkets move into town, Pg. 27 Senior-friendly is the new look, Pg. 25 Commercial properties get HVAC grants, Pg. 27 Enhance your space with Feng Shui, Pg. 27 Fountains spilling with excitement, Pg. 23 Not too late, get those veggies planted Pg. 24 Automotive Review: Toyota 4Runner Pg. 26 SUBMITTED BY DESIGNS BY SUNDOWN F ountains come in all shapes, all sizes and can be formal or natural in design. They provide a sooth- ing, comforting sound that allows us the perfect setting to escape from the worries of everyday life. The landscape professionals at Designs By Sundown have noticed a focus in recent years toward custom-built fountains. Award-winning landscape designer, Adam Hallauer, said, “ The trend continues to shift toward more of an out- door living room. Clients still want sound and movement in their landscapes but in a more sculptural or artistic setting.” Fountains provide the perfect solution. The real beauty of a fountain is that they lend them- selves well to virtually any garden location, large or small. They can be built on an existing wall to add char- acter, color and charm to any setting. Or, are you thinking about adding a new rock wall to your landscape? Why not try something a bit different and reserve a section for a fountain that spills over the rim? And, another option: cored-out boulders (make sure you can select the perfect boulder). They are a great addition to the more natural- style gardens and supply just a trickle of water. Each one is truly unique in appearance and size. Re-circulating fountains are low on wateruse yet still provide the tranquil sound of flowing water so soughtafter in gardens. You won’t be the only one enjoying this new addition to your outdoor setting. Now is the perfect time to make enhancements to your garden. Be sure to include a one-of-a-kind flowing foun- tain. Then, turn off the TV, step outside and enjoy some stress-free time communing with nature in your own pri- vate space. For more information, visit www.designsbysun down.com. SUBMITTED BY CITY OF LITTLETON T he legend and lifetime contribu- tions of one of Littleton’s most prominent citizens will come full circle June 4 when the 1921 Edwin A. Bemis home is officially dedicated, and a $300,000 exterior preservation project is unveiled. The dedication will start at 3 p.m. and will feature remarks by Mayor Doug Clark, History Colorado State Historical Fund Director Steve Turner and Western Welcome Week President Janelle Sullivan. Bemis family members traveling from out of state are also expected to attend. The public is welcome and refresh- ments will be served until 5 p.m. Bemis co-founded Littleton’s 85 year-old community celebra- tion Western Welcome Week and founded the Littleton Historical So- ciety, which later became Historic Littleton Inc. In a twist of fate that is almost too good to be true, the headquarters of WWW and the of- fices of HLI are now located in the Bemis home. The Bemis residence at 5890 S. Bemis St. was the family home for 57 years. Bemis died in 1978 and deeded the home to the city. Adjacent to Sterne Park, the home was occupied for many years by an employee of South Suburban Parks and Recreation. After the home sat vacant for a number of years, Little- ton City Council designated it as a Littleton Historic Landmark in 2005. City Council wanted to find a use for the home that would ensure its preservation and meet the needs of the community. In 2007, the city applied for a grant from the SHF to stabilize and rehabilitate the house. In 2008, the SHF awarded a $198,483 grant to replace the roof, stabilize the base- ment support system, rehabilitate the windows and doors, and remove the asbestos shingles. The city add- ed $93,904 for a total project cost of $292,387. The home also received a fresh coat of paint in colors that are believed to be like the original colors. South Suburban Parks and Recreation staff cleaned up the overgrown vegetation, installed a sprinkler system and landscaped the grounds with labor, supplies and sod donated by local companies. Edwin Bemis was one of the most influential Littleton residents of the 20th century. He was man- ager of the Littleton Creamery. He became an apprentice printer at the Littleton Independent when he was 11 and purchased it in 1919. He was in the first graduating class of Little- ton High School. He became town treasurer, probably the youngest one in Colorado. He was a founding member and the first president of the Littleton Planning Commission. He organized the Arapahoe County Fair Association, and he served as fire chief and deputy sheriff. Little- ton’s only library was named in his honor. He became president and managing editor of the Colorado Press Association. He and his sis- ter opened the town’s first camera and bookshop, and the many pho- tographs he took have been invalu- able in documenting Littleton’s early days. In addition to the financial sup- port provided by the SHF and the city of Littleton, there was broad- based community support for the project. Special thanks: White Construction, SSPR, WWW board members and staff, Historic Little- ton Inc., the Bemis family, Andrews & Anderson Architects, American Civil Constructors, Schultz Indus- tries, Rainbird Corporation and many individual volunteers. Bemis house gets a facelift, dedication for every garden F ountains Edwin A. Bemis’s house in 1921 Edwin A. Bemis’s house today, which will be dedicated in a June 4 ceremony. Courtesy city of Littleton

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digs is a supplemental publication of The Villager Newspaper. Produced twice a month, this new section will feature stories about home improvement and décor, lawn/garden care and landscaping. Digs will also focus on real estate – supplying real estate agents and brokers with a platform to highlight their properties, expertise and services.

TRANSCRIPT

  • DEVELOPMENT

    DIGS is a supplemental publication of The VillagerNewspaper. Produced twice a month, this new section will feature stories about home improvement and dcor, lawn/garden care and landscaping. DIGS will also focus on

    real estate supplying real estate agents and brokers with a platform to highlight their properties, expertise and services. NEXT EDITION: JUNE 3AD DEADLINE: MAY 27

    digs

    THE VILLAGER NEWSPAPER MAY 20, 2010

    REAL ESTATEHOME & GARDEN

    DEVELOPMENTdigs

    HOME &GARDEN

    REAL ESTATE

    whats inside

    Historic Bemis house gets renewed life, Pg. 23 Smart new supermarkets move into town, Pg. 27

    Senior-friendly is the new look, Pg. 25 Commercial properties get HVAC grants, Pg. 27 Enhance your space with Feng Shui, Pg. 27

    Fountains spilling with excitement, Pg. 23 Not too late, get those veggies planted Pg. 24 Automotive Review: Toyota 4Runner Pg. 26

    SUBMITTED BY DESIGNS BY SUNDOWN

    Fountains come in all shapes, all sizes and can be formal or natural in design. They provide a sooth-ing, comforting sound that allows us the perfect setting to escape from the worries of everyday life. The landscape professionals at Designs By

    Sundown have noticed a focus in recent years toward custom-built fountains.

    Award-winning landscape designer, Adam Hallauer, said, The trend continues to shift toward more of an out-door living room. Clients still want sound and movement in their landscapes but in a more sculptural or artistic setting.

    Fountains provide the perfect solution.The real beauty of a fountain is that they lend them-

    selves well to virtually any garden location, large or small. They can be built on an existing wall to add char-acter, color and charm to any setting. Or, are you thinking about adding a new rock wall to your landscape? Why not try something a bit different and reserve a section for a fountain that spills over the rim? And, another option: cored-out boulders (make sure you can select the perfect boulder). They are a great addition to the more natural-style gardens and supply just a trickle of water. Each one is truly unique in appearance and size.

    Re-circulating fountains are low on wateruse yet still provide the tranquil sound of fl owing water so soughtafter in gardens. You wont be the only one enjoying this new addition to your outdoor setting.

    Now is the perfect time to make enhancements to your garden. Be sure to include a one-of-a-kind fl owing foun-tain. Then, turn off the TV, step outside and enjoy some stress-free time communing with nature in your own pri-vate space.

    For more information, visit www.designsbysundown.com.

    SUBMITTED BY CITY OF LITTLETON

    The legend and lifetime contribu-tions of one of Littletons most prominent citizens will come full circle June 4 when the 1921 Edwin A. Bemis home is offi cially dedicated, and a $300,000 exterior preservation project is unveiled. The dedication will start at 3 p.m. and will feature remarks by Mayor

    Doug Clark, History Colorado State Historical Fund Director Steve Turner and Western Welcome Week President Janelle Sullivan. Bemis family members traveling from out of state are also expected to attend. The public is welcome and refresh-ments will be served until 5 p.m.

    Bemis co-founded Littletons 85 year-old community celebra-

    tion Western Welcome Week and founded the Littleton Historical So-ciety, which later became Historic Littleton Inc. In a twist of fate that is almost too good to be true, the headquarters of WWW and the of-fi ces of HLI are now located in the Bemis home.

    The Bemis residence at 5890 S. Bemis St. was the family home for 57 years. Bemis died in 1978 and deeded the home to the city. Adjacent to Sterne Park, the home was occupied for many years by an employee of South Suburban Parks and Recreation. After the home sat vacant for a number of years, Little-ton City Council designated it as a Littleton Historic Landmark in 2005. City Council wanted to fi nd a use for the home that would ensure its preservation and meet the needs of the community.

    In 2007, the city applied for a grant from the SHF to stabilize and rehabilitate the house. In 2008, the SHF awarded a $198,483 grant to replace the roof, stabilize the base-ment support system, rehabilitate the windows and doors, and remove the asbestos shingles. The city add-ed $93,904 for a total project cost of $292,387. The home also received a fresh coat of paint in colors that are believed to be like the original colors. South Suburban Parks and Recreation staff cleaned up the overgrown vegetation, installed a sprinkler system and landscaped

    the grounds with labor, supplies and sod donated by local companies.

    Edwin Bemis was one of the most infl uential Littleton residents of the 20th century. He was man-ager of the Littleton Creamery. He became an apprentice printer at the Littleton Independent when he was 11 and purchased it in 1919. He was in the fi rst graduating class of Little-ton High School. He became town treasurer, probably the youngest one in Colorado. He was a founding member and the fi rst president of the Littleton Planning Commission. He organized the Arapahoe County Fair Association, and he served as fi re chief and deputy sheriff. Little-tons only library was named in his honor. He became president and managing editor of the Colorado Press Association. He and his sis-ter opened the towns fi rst camera and bookshop, and the many pho-tographs he took have been invalu-able in documenting Littletons early days.

    In addition to the fi nancial sup-port provided by the SHF and the city of Littleton, there was broad-based community support for the project. Special thanks: White Construction, SSPR, WWW board members and staff, Historic Little-ton Inc., the Bemis family, Andrews & Anderson Architects, American Civil Constructors, Schultz Indus-tries, Rainbird Corporation and many individual volunteers.

    Bemis house gets a facelift,dedication

    f o r e v e r y g a r d e nFountains

    Edwin A. Bemiss house in 1921

    Edwin A. Bemiss house today, which will be dedicated in a June 4 ceremony. Courtesy city of Littleton

  • PAGE 24 THE VILLAGER May 20, 2010

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    REMODEL/CUSTOM BUILD

    BY ROBERT COX, CSU EXTENSION

    S o if youre committing to a backyard vegetable har-vest, good for you. Grow-ing your own vegetables isnt only a budget-friendly choice, but working in the dirt also been shown to improve peoples mood and immune system.

    The question of when to plant vegetables in Colorado can vary from year to year. To determine spring vegetable planting time, youll want to consider soil or germination temperature.

    We recommend planting when soils reach the minimum germination temperature for each crop, which is often indi-cated on the seed packet.

    Soil temperature can be mea-sured with a standard thermom-eter, sunk 4 inches deep in your garden. Take precautions to avoid breaking a glass thermom-eter by fi rst making a pilot hole in the soil using a screwdriver of similar diameter.

    By now, many vegetable gar-deners have already planted the hardiest, cool-season vegetables, including peas, onions, lettuce, radish and spinach. These can be planted as early as March and grow with daytime temperatures as low as 40 degrees.

    In April, you should have planted semi-hardy vegetables, such as beets, onions, carrots, caulifl ower, parsley, parsnips, potatoes, and Swiss chard. Most of these vegetables grow with minimum temperatures of 40 to 50 degrees, but are less tolerant of a frosty night.

    Now at the end of May, it is the time to plant warm-season vegetables such as beans, celery, corn, cucumbers, squash, mel-ons, pepper and tomato. These

    crops require warmer soil and daytime temperatures above 60 degrees. They prefer summer-like weather with temperatures between 70 and 95 degrees. They are intolerant of frost and may be sensitive to cool spring winds.

    Planting methods for these crops vary. Pepper and toma-toes produce well when start-ed indoors in early March or April for transplanting later in the month in warmer soil. If you havent already started the transplants, consider purchasing small transplants at a local gar-dening center.

    Cucumbers, squash, bean and melons are often best when grown by direct-seeding in late May, rather than by transplants.

    In mid-July, you can plan to again plant cool-season and semi-hardy vegetables by direct seed for harvest during cooler fall weather.

    The best tip for a Colorado vegetable gardener is to be fl ex-ible, adapt to weather changes, try a variety of gardening meth-ods and know why they are working for you, and to enjoy the challenge of it all.

    Colorado Master Gardeners are available to assist you with lawn, garden, landscape and pest questions. Call the CSU Extension - Arapahoe County at 303-730-1920 or stop by our offi ce at 5804 S. Datura St. in Littleton any weekday between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. for free help. For more yard and gar-den information, visit www.ext.colostate.edu/.

    Vegetable planting tips for late spring

    digs

  • DRCOG promotes senior-friendly design of our neighborhoodsBy Jennifer Schaufele, Executive Director DRCOG

    Its a simple fact that all of us are growing older, day by day. If youve watched the news lately, youre probably aware the baby boom generation is enter-ing the ranks of the senior citizenry - only three years ago, the fi rst baby boomer fi led for Social Security benefi ts. The strain on our Social Security system that all these new applicants generates has been a top-ic of serious discussion in Wash-ington and around the country, along with demand for Medicare for many years.

    Not only are we growing older, were living longer, and while that is a good thing it certainly takes some adjustment to the way we think about aging. Picture the ste-reotypical image of a row of old folks sitting in rocking chairs on the porch in front of the local rest home - is that the way youd like to live out your life? I think most of us, if asked, would say that we want to remain healthy as long as we can, active as long as we can, and live in the communities we cherished throughout the earlier parts of our lives.

    Young families and older cou-ples may not think what they want in a neighborhood and houses have much in common, but, in fact, a lot of the things they look for and need can be expressed in the same way: ease in fi nding ones way around, access to goods and services, the ability to enjoy time outdoors, and convenience and comfort in the home.

    Several years ago, the Board of Directors at my organization, the Denver Regional Council of Gov-ernments, decided that the concept of whats known as senior-friend-ly design was important enough to be added to our plan for the metro areas future growth and develop-ment. That plan, Metro Vision, represents a broad goal for main-taining whats best about living in and around Denver, and is fl exible enough for each of our member communities to make it meet their own needs. Planners who work for local governments throughout our region are talking to develop-ers and examining zoning codes, working with their elected offi cials and trying to determine how best to accommodate elders among us. DRCOGs role, not only as the re-gions planning agency but as the federally designated Area Agency on Aging for eight of the metro ar-eas nine counties, is to help facili-

    tate conversations at the regional level and to raise awareness about this important issue.

    Some of the concepts that weve identifi ed as being critical to senior-friendly, senior-healthy design may strike you as elementary; in truth, theres nothing to it thats diffi cult to understand. Many, if not all of them are helpful to everyone in a community, not just older adults, so they should be easy for people to be aware of and to understand.

    To start with, there are housing options. When communities offer a variety of choices in their housing stock, it makes it easier for people to stay in the same area when their needs change. Fewer bedrooms, a smaller yard, no yard? Those are common requests for older people when they decide to leave a long-time family home. Yet if they dont want to leave a church commu-nity, neighbors, familiar shops and medical providers, the decision to move can be a diffi cult one. Pro-viding options makes that choice easier. Along with options, there are design considerations to mak-ing homes easier not only for older people to live in, but to visitimportant attributes for younger people who cherish visits from older friends and relatives. Some of these attributes are entryways that dont require steps to the threshold, levered door handles instead of knobs, wide doorways and more. And if thats not enough, theres

    also the concept of the Accessory Dwelling Units, or ADUs if youre not familiar with that term, think of the example of a mother-in-law apartment. Zoning in some communities doesnt currently allow for these kinds of arrange-ments, which can provide useful living arrangements for families who want an older relative to live on their property and yet maintain some independence.

    Then there are things like park amenities: benches, lighting, rest-rooms. Wide paths and sidewalks that make it easy for different types of users (pedestrians, bicyclists, baby strollers and wheelchairs) to share the same space safely and comfortably. Lighting in any pub-lic place and signs that are big and well-placed so as to be easily read. That makes everyone feel safer and more secure.

    Finally, transportation choices, including pedestrian access, are important. Neighborhoods should have easy connections to centers of retail and commercial activity that give people choices beyond using a car. Being able to walk to do errands is an easy way to main-tain exercise, a key part of staying healthy longer. Good health keeps expenses down, as does the ability to make do without a car, or to go from having two cars to one.

    Remember all those rocking chairs on the rest home porch? Pic-ture them all empty and all of those people taking part in community life around you. The future is now for some people who are trying to keep leading the lives theyve be-come accustomed to. We owe it to them and to our future selves to en-sure that we have the best, healthi-est options to keep seniors among us and not on the sidelines.

    Jennifer Schaufele is a Greenwood Village resident and executive director of the Denver Regional Council of Governments, a nonprofi t governed by a Board of Directors, representing 56 counties and municipal governments.

    digs May 20, 2010 THE VILLAGER PAGE 25

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    This photo is used in DRCOGs Metro Vision Plan as an illustration of senior-friendly design: wide sidewalks and benches in front of retail developments to make it easy to navigate on foot or via wheelchair or scooter.

    Photo courtesy of DRCOG

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  • PAGE 26 THE VILLAGER May 20, 2010

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    2010 4Runner needs some heart surgeryBy H. Throttle

    W hy is it when we get in trouble we seem to work harder at whatever it is that we have done wrong? Thats seems to make sense that we accept whatever the challenge may be and vow to do better. That might explain why weve received two Toyota products to test drive in the past several weeks. No doubt Toyota is attempt-ing to show that theyre alive and well, and you know they really are back. Im not sure that they ever went anywhere but that little Prius suppos-edly just wouldnt slow down?

    Most Toyotas never stop going, theyre like the energizer bunny, and they just keep on go-ing. A daughter had one and after 150,000 miles she fi nally had to replace a windshield wiper be-cause it was frozen to the windshield and broke when turned on without loosening the ice, driver error.

    Toyotas headaches and bad press has been an elixir for the Ford Motor Co. and their many fi ne new products. Frankly, Ford is on a roll and doesnt need this kind of help from Toyota; they each have many fi ne qualities and niches. Most of the auto industry have moved past any recent problems and most probably feel that such an incident and the media play could happen to any manufacturer at any time.

    Arriving in the back yard last week was a very macho 2010 Toyota 4Runner. Delivered to the doorstep, the list price on this beauty was $36,600 with more than $6,000 in extra features such as back-up camera, electronic equipment and extra nice cab features like leather trimmed and heated seats. Most people would want and like the many extra features that really should have been included in the list place.

    Made in Japan, the 4Runner arrived in the USA via Long Beach, Calif. The SUV has clas-sic styling, and excellent quality exterior and in-terior. It appears to be very well built and 4Run-

    ners have been popular especially among young adult males.

    While the Toyota Avalon was a shear pleasure to drive around Denver and in the mountains, the 4Runner was among the worst performing vehicles in recent memory. The failing feature that was so obvious in driving to Idaho Springs was the lack of power that could be explained in two different ways. Hopefully the fi rst, that the vehicle was set up for sea level driving, not tuned for mile high mountain climbing. Second, that a prior test driver had purchased some very cheap fuel. The 4Runner was listless, vastly un-derpowered, and thanks to the very good fi ve-speed variable shift transmission that was badly needed to maintain a lowly 55 mph up Monu-ment Hill west of Denver. The motor wasnt missing, it just seemed to lug down in the D position making it necessary to go to the lower gears to maintain any highway speeds.

    The 4Runner hails a 4.0L engine that is sup-posed to produce 270 horsepower. That should be more than enough power, but it wasnt even close and leaving the car in the Drive mode would have been at best a creep up the high-way with cars passing on the inside and outside lanes. Again, it took two lower gears to maintain a reasonable highway speed. Something surely is wrong, so take the power performance lightly, but test it for sure. On level highway the vehicle seemed to be performing normally.

    It always seems strange when they put such

    a massive steering wheel in vehicles such as the 4Runner. This is part of the macho image but one can hardly get a grip on the huge steering wheel circumference.

    Having just returned the Avalon that was close to perfection, the 4Runner lacked con-siderable stability and handing. It seems to be awkward on the highway, the ride was stiff as it probably should be in such an outdoor vehicle. The XM radio wasnt activated so Mike Rosen and Russ Limbaugh were the KOA features of the day, along with the Rockies losing again be-cause they cant bat very well, same weakness as last year.

    Summing up, the 4Runner has all the bells and whistles, but Toyota wants to charge extra for them. Quality of construction and design are excellent. Because the engine was so ineffi cient, the posted gas mileage of 22 highway and 17 in the city is questionable, at least for the test mod-el. Large, heavy SUVs burn lots of fuel, but one can hope the vehicle isnt engineered underpow-ered. Ford and others have found that in these mountains it takes larger, sometimes turbo-power, to tame the steeper mountain highways. Japan highways are rather fl at and crowded with little cars with great highway mileage.

    Needless to say, the Avalon was superb, but the 4Runner needs some heart surgery or some premium gasoline, or both; maybe thats the way it runs?

    The list price on this beauty was $36,600 with more than $6,000 in extra features.Photo by H. Throttle

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    This is not a dream. The truth is that installing a synthetic turf lawn by FieldTurf is fast becoming one of the most popular home improvement projects in decades.

    At FIELDTurf Colorado we can help you create the yard of your dreams. Give us a call today to set up a free estimate and see for yourself what FIELDTurf Colorado can do for you!

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    digs

  • Smart and Final, a privately held company out of Cali-fornia, is planning to open two bulk grocery stores in vacant former Albertsons stores in

    Littleton and Centennial.Each store would employ

    about 100. A job fair is scheduled for May 20-21, at the Holiday Inn Denver East Stapleton, 3333 Quebec St., near Interstate-70.

    The Centennial store is planned to be at 16746 E. Smoky Hill Road, near South Buckley Road. The Littleton store is planned to be at 3615 W. Bowles Ave., near South Lowell Boulevard.

    SmartCo, as the stores are called, would be like small Cost-co Warehouses about the size of a King Soopers, but shoppers

    would be able to buy in bulk but without a membership require-ment.

    The company also plans to open one store in Longmont and two in the city of Denver.

    Smart and Final operates about 250 stores in the western United States and northern Mexico, ac-cording to the company.

    Jennifer Schaufele, execu-tive director of the Den-ver Regional Council of Governments, has been appointed by Offi ce of Personnel Management Director John Berry to serve on the 2010 Presidential Rank Award Review Board in Denver.

    Schaufele was nominated for the review board by HUD Re-gional Director Rick Garcia and will join nine other private citi-zens representing a variety of oc-cupational fi elds on the review board, including DRCOG Board Member and Boulder Council Member Macon Cowles.

    The review board met May 18 to evaluate and rate nominations for the Presidential Rank Awards

    Program. The program recogniz-es career members of the Senior Executive Service for exceptional performance over an extended period.

    The Denver review board is one of four meeting throughout the nation to forward recommen-dations to the OPM director. He then recommends potential win-ners to the president, who makes the fi nal selection.

    Schaufele, who came to DRCOG in July 2004, is the or-ganizations fi rst woman execu-tive director since its founding in 1955. Schaufele manages a 90-member staff and works with a 57-member board. She also has a variety of regional roles, in-cluding serving by gubernatorial

    appointment on the Regional Air Quality Council and the Colorado Complete Count Committee and as a member of the Denver Union Station Project Authority.

    digs May 20, 2010 THE VILLAGER PAGE 27

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    Commercial properties eligible for HVAC replacement grantSubmitted by the city of Centennial

    This summer, the city of Cen-tennial plans to launch the new HVAC Replacement Grant. The city has allo-cated $85,358 in available match-ing grant funds to assist in the re-placement of commercial HVAC systems to more energy effi cient LEED units. A $5,000 matching grant is available for commercial, non-residential, property owners

    who meet the following require-ments: The unit must only be used for

    commercial purposes on com-mercial property

    The property must be located within the incorporated bound-aries of the city of Centennial

    The property owner or an au-thorized representative must submit the grant application. Applications submitted by un-authorized third parties will not be accepted

    Property owners or an autho-rized representatives must submit energy use data for existing units and estimated energy use data for new units

    Replacement units must be LEED certifi ed

    Contractors must obtain all re-quired permits and approvals from the citys Building Divi-sionApplications are available at

    the citys Building Services desk.Grants will be reviewed by

    the Offi ce of Economic Devel-opment and will be granted on a fi rst-come, fi rst-served basis. The $5,000 grant will be submitted to the applicant. For more informa-tion, please contact Corri Spiegel, Economic Development man-ger, 303-754-3351 or [email protected]

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    Jennifer Schaufele

    a breath ofFRESH AIR

    s tma r

    Feng Shui teaches how to enhance your environments to reach your goals in this case, to sell your home. Assuming your home is priced correctly for the market, you will achieve your goal of getting calls for showings. This workshop is for people who understand the integ-

    rity of the sell-ing process and want to invite positive energy into shaping the experience for

    everyone involved. Students are encouraged to send photos to Lor-rie prior to the class. Feng Shui for Home Sellers offers practical tools you can implement: Prepare your home and your fam-

    ily energetically for the tran-sition.

    See your home for sale through Feng Shui eyes.

    Welcome buyers and invite them to linger.

    Use Feng Shui tools like the ba-gua and the fi ve elements to en-ergize the spaces in your home.

    Be memorable.This 2-hour workshop will be

    given through the Colorado Free University three Saturdays, May 22, June 26 and July 31, 9:30 11:30 a.m. at the CFU campus in Lowry, located at East First and Quebec. Teacher Lorrie Webb Grillo is a Certifi ed Practitioner of Essential Feng Shui and owner of Thriving Spaces, a Feng Shui con-sulting and product development company. Sign up for the classes at www.freeu.com.

    NOW THATS

    Feng Shui: Enhance your space to help sell your home

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