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  • Developments of ADMSPresented by

    David CarruthersCambridge Environmental ResearchCambridge Environmental Research

    Consultants

    DMUG, London, 24 November 2005

  • OutlineADMS3/ADMS4ADMS-Urban/ADMS-RoadsADMS-Airportp

  • after ADMS 3?

    What applications do you currently use ADMS for?Whi h d l ti t/l t l ?Which model options are most/least popular? Which pollutants are of most/least interest?What scientific capabilities would you like to see in ADMS?What other features would you like to see?Other issues?Other issues?

  • ProcessUser Group Meeting session, June 2003Feedback from helpdesk, training etcOwn ideasNew scientific information, validationNew scientific information, validationWrote to users in April 2004 seeking iviews

  • Current Features of

    plumes or

    ADMS 3

    plumes or puffs

    NOx chemistry

    odours

    plume

    fluctuations

    plume rise

    wet deposition

    dry deposition

    radioactive decay and

    d

    plume visibility

    changes in surface

    flow over complex terrain

    dispersion

    gamma dose

    time varying emissions

    surface roughness

    paround buildings

  • Meteorology

    Issues - Decreasing number of surface met sitesQuality control of meteorological data Use of met model for met data inputFuture weather - climate change

    Developments - Allowance for input of vertical profilesAllow use of mesoscale model 3D fields and CFD output (building module)

  • All past years Glasgow data

    0 1020

    30

    40

    50

    60

    70290

    300

    310

    320

    330340

    350

    1000

    1500

    2000

    2500

    3000

    3500

    All future years Glasgow data

    0 1020

    30

    40

    50

    60

    70290

    300

    310

    320

    330340

    350

    1000

    1500

    2000

    2500

    3000

    3500

    Climate Change8090

    100

    110

    120

    130

    140220

    230

    240

    250

    260

    270

    280500

    80

    90

    100

    110

    120

    130

    140220

    230

    240

    250

    260

    270

    280500 Climate Change

    Wind roses for Glasgow under the

    0

    0

    3

    1.5

    6

    3.1

    10

    5.1

    16

    8.2

    (knots)

    (m/s)

    Wind speed

    150160

    170180190200

    210

    0

    0

    3

    1.5

    6

    3.1

    10

    5.1

    16

    8.2

    (knots)

    (m/s)

    Wind speed

    150160

    170180190200

    210

    All past years (summer) Glasgow data

    0

    All future years (summer) Glasgow data

    0

    Glasgow under the current and future climate scenarios. All year summer and0 10 20

    30

    40

    50

    60

    70

    80

    90270

    280

    290

    300

    310

    320

    330340

    350

    500

    1000

    1500

    20000 10

    2030

    40

    50

    60

    70

    80

    90270

    280

    290

    300

    310

    320

    330340

    350

    500

    1000

    1500

    2000year, summer, and winter roses are presented. For each scenario the results90100

    110

    120

    130

    140

    150160

    170180190200

    210

    220

    230

    240

    250

    260

    270 90

    100

    110

    120

    130

    140

    150160

    170180190200

    210

    220

    230

    240

    250

    260

    270 scenario, the results are for the four years combined.

    0

    0

    3

    1.5

    6

    3.1

    10

    5.1

    16

    8.2

    (knots)

    (m/s)

    Wind speed

    0

    0

    3

    1.5

    6

    3.1

    10

    5.1

    16

    8.2

    (knots)

    (m/s)

    Wind speed

    All past years (winter) Glasgow data

    0 1020

    30

    40320

    330340

    350

    1500

    2000

    All future years (winter) Glasgow data

    0 1020

    30

    40320

    330340

    350

    1500

    2000

    50

    60

    70

    80

    90

    100

    110250

    260

    270

    280

    290

    300

    310

    500

    1000

    150050

    60

    70

    80

    90

    100

    110250

    260

    270

    280

    290

    300

    310

    500

    1000

    1500

    0

    0

    3

    1.5

    6

    3.1

    10

    5.1

    16

    8.2

    (knots)

    (m/s)

    Wind speed

    110

    120

    130

    140

    150160

    170180190200

    210

    220

    230

    240

    250

    0

    0

    3

    1.5

    6

    3.1

    10

    5.1

    16

    8.2

    (knots)

    (m/s)

    Wind speed

    110

    120

    130

    140

    150160

    170180190200

    210

    220

    230

    240

    250

  • Climate ChangeLong term average of NOxfor past (1971, 1976, 1981, 1986) and future , )years (2071, 2076, 2081, 2086) calculated using ADMS 3.2 (point sources) ( )and ADMS-Urban (road source) with Glasgow meteorological data. Note the scale bar does not relate to the large power station plot which covers 16 16k ll th l t1616km; all other plots are 66km and do relate to the scale bar.

  • Calculated changes in spatial maxima of various NOxconcentration statistics: Glasgow met dataconcentration statistics: Glasgow met data

  • Wet DepositionCurrent Formation

    LCdz=

    F LCdz

    Washout coefficient L=APB P precipitation rate

    =0

    wetF

    washoutFalling

    p p

    SO2 - slow rate of uptake/outgassing

    gDropMethod (JEP) compared with drop fall time

    HCl limits uptake of SO2

    NO equilibrium with ambient concentration

    (JEP)

    NO2 equilibrium with ambient concentrationupdate in drop slow little deposition

  • S02 wet depositionS02 et depos t o

    8000

    10000

    8000

    10000

    4000

    6000

    8000

    6.00 4000

    6000

    0 05

    0.06

    -2000

    0

    2000

    Met

    res

    3.00

    4.00

    5.00

    -2000

    0

    2000

    Met

    res

    0.03

    0.04

    0.05

    -8000

    -6000

    -4000

    1.00

    2.00

    -8000

    -6000

    -4000

    0.01

    0.02

    SO2 wet deposition stable met conditions a) pH limiting washout

    0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 14000 16000 18000 20000

    Metres

    -100000 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 14000 16000 18000 20000

    Metres

    -10000

    SO2 wet deposition, stable met conditions a) pH limiting washout coefficient method, b) falling drop method NOTE THESE PLOTS USE DIFFERENT SCALES

  • Dry DepositionDry Deposition

    Current model - Dry deposition velocityCu e t ode y depos t o e oc tyeither specified orcalculated in terms of specified surface roughness and calculated aerodynamic and laminar sub-layer resistance for each hour

    Model development -

    Express surface resistance in terms of stomatal, leaf surface and soil resistance (Smith et al Atmos Env. 34)

    Depends on land use category, solarDepends on land use category, solar radiation, surface roughnessDiurnal and seasonal variations

  • Dry DepositionLand use category - several vegetation types, canopy height, leaf area index, stomatal response

    y epos t o

    g , , p

    Dry DepositionDry Deposition Resistance Analogy aerodynamic

    Laminarsub-layer

    soilLeaf

    surfacestomatalSurface

    resistance

  • UH

    Multiple

    Plume of

    Interacting wakesBuildings

    contaminant from a

    dispersion source upwindp

    C(y)

  • Marine boundary layers

    Surface roughness, wind and wave t d d tparameters are co-dependent

    high waves should be modelled by a high value of surface roughnesssurface roughness

    Calculation of the surface sensible heat flux th i diff t f l d d tover the sea is different from over land due to

    the difference in latent heat flux

  • Marine boundary layersSurface roughness and wind profile parameterisation, used by ECMWF (the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather ( p gForecasting)

    z v u2

    = + *

    Surface layer heat flux parameterisation for surface sensible h t fl d l t t h t fl (ECMWF)

    zu gm Ch0

    = + *

    heat flux and latent heat flux (ECMWF)

    p zuzcF 02 )())((

    +

    +

    +

    +=

    MOMO

    H

    HH

    H

    p

    Lzz

    zzz

    Lzz

    zzz

    F0

    0

    00

    0

    0 lnln0

    +

    +

    +

    +

    =

    qq

    sat

    Lzz

    zzz

    Lzz

    zzz

    zuqzqE

    0000

    0

    lnln

    )())((

    MOMOqq LzLz 00

  • Marine boundary layers: u*1 4

    1.2

    1.4

    1

    0.6

    0.8

    Ust

    ar (m

    /s) USTAR (observed)

    USTAR (Charnock = 0.018)

    USTAR (Charnock = 0.032)

    0.4

    USTAR (Charnock = 0.08)

    USTAR (standard algorithms)

    0.2

    Ti i f di t d d b d l f ( / ) t Ch i ti Th ti t

    0299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308

    day of the year

    Time series of predicted and observed values of (m/s) at Christians. The time at which the wind direction switched from south-westerly to northerly/easterly (and hence off-shore) is shown by a dotted line

  • Marine boundary layers: Heat Flux F0Marine boundary layers: Heat Flux F0300

    200

    250

    Predicted

    150

    a0 (W

    /m2)

    Predicted

    Observed

    50

    100Fthe

    ta

    Predicted,standardalgorithms

    0

    -50299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308

    day of the year

    Time series of predicted and observed values