design unit test review elements & principles. what are the 5 elements?  space  line ...

Download Design Unit Test Review Elements & Principles. What are the 5 Elements?  Space  Line  Texture  Form  Color

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  • Slide 1
  • Design Unit Test Review Elements & Principles
  • Slide 2
  • What are the 5 Elements? Space Line Texture Form Color
  • Slide 3
  • Elements of Design: Colour p.407-425
  • Slide 4
  • Colour has symbolic differences from culture to culture Europe & North America: Brides wear white India & China: Brides wear red America: Black is for mourning Africa: Black symbolizes strength China: Black indicates joy
  • Slide 5
  • Colour & Mood Colour influences how people feel It can be used to create a certain mood [ex: red may make you feel bold or excited] Colour can make a room feel cool (blues & greens) or warm (reds & yellows) The colours you choose will depend on how you use the room
  • Slide 6
  • Colour & Optical Illusions Things appear closer with warm colour and farther with cool colours Bold & bright colours will cause objects to stand out more than pale colours
  • Slide 7
  • The Colour Wheel: Primary Colours Red, Yellow, Blue [colour 1 sections] Equal distance apart on the colour wheel Mixing other colours cannot create primary colours
  • Slide 8
  • The Colour Wheel: Secondary Colours Orange, Green, Violet [colour 2 sections] Mixing equal parts of 2 primary colours makes secondary colours
  • Slide 9
  • The Colour Wheel: Tertiary Colours Created by combining a primary colour with a neighboring secondary colour [colour 3 sections]
  • Slide 10
  • The Colour Wheel
  • Slide 11
  • Colour Terms Hue: the specific name of a colour Intensity: the colours brightness or dullness (primary colours are the most intense) Value: the amount of black or white in a colour Tint: when you add white to a colour to lighten it (ex red to pink) Shade: when you add black to a colour to darken it (ex: blue to navy)
  • Slide 12
  • Hue This is orange Intensity Less Intense More intense
  • Slide 13
  • Value Tint Shade BLUE Add whiteAdd Black
  • Slide 14
  • What are Neutrals? They are not colors on the color wheel Brown, black, white, beige, etc.
  • Slide 15
  • Colour Schemes See handout & textbook (p.415) to complete colour schemes
  • Slide 16
  • The Impact of Colour: Cool colours (ex: blue, green, violet) give the illusion of distance Warm colours (ex: red, orange, yellow) tend to make items advance Contrasting colours (ex: red & green) make objects more defined
  • Slide 17
  • What must be considered before deciding on a colour scheme? p. 418-9
  • Slide 18
  • Things to consider when planning colour: Style of the room Mood of the room What effect do you want to create? Ask the client How much time will be spent in the room p. 418-9
  • Slide 19
  • Elements of Design Element #2: Line
  • Slide 20
  • Marks space Outlines form Conveys a sense of movement or direction One dimension: length Line
  • Slide 21
  • Lines can be Vertical Diagonal Horizontal Curved Our eyes will naturally follow the length of a line. Therefore, we use lines to create illusions or design effects in a space
  • Slide 22
  • Vertical lines Create a sense of height Create a sense of action
  • Slide 23
  • Horizontal lines: Create a feeling of rest/relaxation Can add length to a space
  • Slide 24
  • Diagonal or zig zag lines: Create a sense of excitement Create a sense of movement or energy
  • Slide 25
  • Curved lines: Create a sense of freedom Feel natural
  • Slide 26
  • FORM October 28 th 2013
  • Slide 27
  • Function what a form will be used for. Example, a beds function is a place to sleep Aesthetic the beauty, artistic impact, or appearance of a form
  • Slide 28
  • Form may be two dimensional having length and width Like a wall Like a window
  • Slide 29
  • Form may also be three dimensional having length, width and depth. Like a coffee table
  • Slide 30
  • Form follows Function, Function follows Form The FORM of the object helps the FUNCTION of the object and because of the FUNCTION of the object, the FORM will be suited to that FUNCTION. Easy Example: A Lazy Boy Chair
  • Slide 31
  • + The Elements of Design SPACE
  • Slide 32
  • + Element #1 SPACE What is space? The three dimensional area designed by a designer Examples: a room, a house, a restaurant, a park, etc. A designer either fills or leaves a space open
  • Slide 33
  • + Negative Space: not to be confused with bad or undesirable space The amount of unfilled space Space not taken up by furniture or objects A designer knows how much negative space is needed to make a space look and feel comfortable
  • Slide 34
  • Texture
  • Slide 35
  • Texture has to do with the look and feel that certain textural pieces invoke Before you think, great this is going to be stupid consider some of the textures from your childhood Everyone knows that colour plays a huge part in design but texture is also a large part, if its done right
  • Slide 36
  • Texture Texture is the appearance or feel of the surface of an object. This looks like rough bricks, however it is flat wallpaper Brick or wallpaper?
  • Slide 37
  • Textures can be o physically touched (TACTILE TEXTURE) o Experienced visually (VISUAL TEXTURE) You can often predict what a surface will feel like by looking at it, however certain printing techniques can fool the eye.
  • Slide 38
  • Texture & Effects SMOOTH TEXTURES: Appear lighter in colour because they reflect light Attract attention ROUGH TEXTURES: Appear darker in colour because they absorb light Objects may seem larger
  • Slide 39
  • Scale Balance Proportion Rhythm Emphasis Unity & Variety
  • Slide 40
  • Scale Principles of Design
  • Slide 41
  • There are three ways to think about scale: 1. Human to objects scale 2. Object to object scale 3. Object(s) to space scale
  • Slide 42
  • Human Scale Human scale refers to the relationship between the human body and its environment C. Colli Interior spaces that are excessively large make us, the humans interacting with the space, feel small. Ex: an oversized hotel lobby. On the contrary, spaces that are too small make us feel large. Ex: a small childs playroom.
  • Slide 43
  • Objects/Forms to Space Finally, we must consider the scale between the objects/forms to a space. Furniture can be too large for a space There can be too much furniture There can be too much negative space There can be good scale of objects to space!
  • Slide 44
  • The Principles of Design Balance
  • Slide 45
  • The design principle that provides a feeling of equality It occurs when the amount, size or weight of objects on both sides of a center point is equal or when groups of objects seem to be equal The two main techniques for achieving balance are: Symmetrical balance or Formal balance Asymmetrical balance or Informal balance
  • Slide 46
  • Symmetrical Balance The arrangement of forms on one side of an imaginary central line is the mirror image of the forms on the opposite side Symmetry conveys dignity, quiet, and a feeling of rest and calm Applying symmetrical design is a good place to start when first working with balance but if overused, it may have a monotonous appearance
  • Slide 47
  • Asymmetrical Balance Elements on either side of an imaginary central line are unmatched, but appear to be in balance Different sizes, forms, textures, and colors can be combined to achieve asymmetrical balance Example, a round object can balance a square object of similar or apparently similar weight/size
  • Slide 48
  • Slide 49
  • The Principles of Design Design rules for the elements
  • Slide 50
  • #1 Proportion The size relationships that can be found within an object Proportions are expressed as ratios (2:3) This principle was developed by the ancient Greeks. They discovered that some proportions are more pleasing than others
  • Slide 51
  • Slide 52
  • Pleasing Proportions continued Unequal divisions of space are often more appealing to the eye than equal divisions How would you use a patterned throw to create unequal distribution?
  • Slide 53
  • The Golden Section Ancient Greeks studied proportion and developed the theory of the Golden Section It is the division of a line between one-half and one-third of its total length Ex. curtain tiebacks
  • Slide 54
  • The Golden Rectangle Use this sequence to approximate a golden rectangle: 2,3,5,8,13 (notice how each number is the sum of the two preceding numbers). A rectangle with dimensions based on two consecutive numbers in the sequence 3:5 or 8:13 will be close to the ideal shape http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmaVq

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