david bronstein-zurich international chess tournament 1953

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ZURICH INTERNATIONAL CHESS TOURNAMENT, 1953by DAVID BRONSTEINTranslated from the Second Russian Edition by JIM MARFIA

www.echessbook.com

CONTENTSROUND ONE 1. Szabo - Geller 2. Najdorf - Reshevsky 3. Petrosian - Keres 4. Averbakh - Smyslov 5. Taimanov - Bronstein 6. Euwe - Kotov 7. Stahlberg Boleslavsky ROUND TWO 8. Kotov Stahlberg 9. Geller - Euwe 10. Smyslov - Szabo 11. Keres - Averbakh 12. Reshevsky - Petrosian 13. Bronstein - Najdorf 14. Gligoric - Taimanov ROUND THREE 15. Najdorf - Gligoric 16. Petrosian - Bronstein 17. Averbakh - Reshevsky 18. Szabo - Keres 19. Euwe - Smyslov 20. Stahlberg - Geller 21. Boleslavsky - Kotov ROUND FOUR 22. Geller - Boleslavsky 23. Smyslov - Stahlberg 24. Keres - Euwe 25. Reshevsky - Szabo 26. Bronstein - Averbakh 27. Gligoric - Petrosian 28. Taimanov - Najdorf ROUND FIVE 29. Petrosian - Taimanov 30. Averbakh - Gligoric 31. Szabo - Bronstein 32. Euwe - Reshevsky 33. Stahlberg - Keres 1 3 5 6 7 10 10 17 18 21 21 22 25 26 29 29 30 31 32 36 38 41 42 44 45 46 46 48 51 52 55 57 59 ii 34. Boleslavsky - Smyslov 35. Kotov - Geller ROUND SIX 36. Smyslov - Kotov 37. Keres - Boleslavsky 38. Reshevsky - Stahlberg 39. Bronstein - Euwe 40. Gligoric - Szabo 41. Taimanov - Averbakh 42. Najdorf - Petrosian ROUND SEVEN 43. Averbakh - Najdorf 44. Szabo - Taimanov 45. Euwe - Gligoric 46. Stahlberg - Bronstein 47. Boleslavsky - Reshevsky 48. Kotov - Keres 49. Geller - Smyslov ROUND EIGHT 50. Keres - Geller 51. Reshevsky - Kotov 52. Bronstein - Boleslavsky 53. Gligoric - Stahlberg 54. Taimanov - Euwe 55. Najdorf - Szabo 56. Petrosian - Averbakh ROUND NINE 57. Szabo - Petrosian 58. Euwe - Najdorf 59. Stahlberg - Taimanov 60. Boleslavsky - Gligoric 61. Kotov - Bronstein 62. Geller - Reshevsky 63. Smyslov - Keres ROUND TEN 64. Reshevsky - Smyslov 65. Bronstein - Geller 66. Gligoric - Kotov 61 61 63 65 66 68 72 74 77 80 81 81 83 84 85 87 90 90 92 92 92 95 97 99 101 104 106 109 112 114 116 116 117

67. Taimanov - Boleslavsky 68. Najdorf - Stahlberg 69. Petrosian - Euwe 70. Averbakh - Szabo ROUND ELEVEN 71. Euwe - Averbakh 72. Stahlberg - Petrosian 73. Boleslavsky - Najdorf 74. Kotov - Taimanov 75. Geller - Gligoric 76. Smyslov - Bronstein 77. Keres - Reshevsky ROUND TWELVE 78. Bronstein - Keres 79. Gligoric - Smyslov 80. Taimanov - Geller 81. Najdorf - Kotov 82. Petrosian - Boleslavsky 83. Averbakh - Stahlberg 84. Szabo - Euwe ROUND THIRTEEN 85. Stahlberg - Szabo 86. Boleslavsky - Averbakh 87. Kotov - Petrosian 88. Geller - Najdorf 89. Smyslov - Taimanov 90. Keres - Gligoric 91. Reshevsky - Bronstein ROUND FOURTEEN 92. Gligoric - Reshevsky 93. Taimanov - Keres 94. Najdorf - Smyslov 95. Petrosian - Geller 96. Averbakh - Kotov 97. Szabo - Boleslavsky 98. Euwe - Stahlberg ROUND FIFTEEN 99. Boleslavsky - Euwe 100. Kotov - Szabo 101. Geller - Averbakh

120 122 124 127 130 132 133 134 136 139 142 147 149 151 153 155 155 156 158 160 163 165 167 168 168 172 172 176 176 177 180 180 186 187 190 iii

102. Smyslov - Petrosian 103. Keres - Najdorf 104. Reshevsky - Taimanov 105. Bronstein - Gligoric ROUND SIXTEEN 106. Bronstein - Taimanov 107. Reshevsky - Najdorf 108. Keres - Petrosian 109. Smyslov - Averbakh 110. Geller - Szabo 111. Kotov - Euwe 112. Boleslavsky - Stahlberg ROUND SEVENTEEN 113. Stahlberg - Kotov 114. Euwe - Geller 115. Szabo - Smyslov 116. Averbakh - Keres 117. Petrosian - Reshevsky 118. Najdorf - Bronstein 119. Taimanov - Gligoric ROUND EIGHTEEN 120. Gligoric - Najdorf 121. Bronstein - Petrosian 122. Reshevsky - Averbakh 123. Keres - Szabo 124. Smyslov - Euwe 125. Geller - Stahlberg 126. Kotov - Boleslavsky ROUND NINETEEN 127. Boleslavsky - Geller 128. Stahlberg - Smyslov 129. Euwe - Keres 130. Szabo - Reshevsky 131. Averbakh - Bronstein 132. Petrosian - Gligoric 133. Najdorf - Taimanov ROUND TWENTY 134. Taimanov - Petrosian 135. Gligoric - Averbakh 136. Bronstein - Szabo

192 195 197 200 204 204 205 206 208 210 211 214 216 217 218 219 220 221 225 226 227 229 232 235 236 239 241 242 244 245 246 248 250 252 253

137. Reshevsky - Euwe 138. Keres - Stahlberg 139. Smyslov - Boleslavsky 140. Geller - Kotov ROUND TWENTY-ONE 141. Kotov - Smyslov 142. Boleslavsky - Keres 143. Stahlberg - Reshevsky 144. Euwe - Bronstein 145. Szabo - Gligoric 146. Averbakh - Taimanov 147. Petrosian - Najdorf ROUND TWENTY-TWO 148. Najdorf - Averbakh 149. Taimanov - Szabo 150. Gligoric - Euwe 151. Bronstein - Stahlberg 152. Reshevsky - Boleslavsky 153. Keres - Kotov 154. Smyslov - Geller ROUND TWENTY-THREE 155. Geller - Keres 156. Kotov - Reshevsky 157. Boleslavsky - Bronstein 158. Stahlberg - Gligoric 159. Euwe - Taimanov 160. Szabo - Najdorf 161. Averbakh - Petrosian ROUND TWENTY-FOUR 162. Petrosian - Szabo 163. Najdorf - Euwe 164. Taimanov - Stahlberg 165. Gligoric - Boleslavsky 166. Bronstein - Kotov 167. Reshevsky - Geller 168. Keres - Smyslov ROUND TWENTY-FIVE 169. Smyslov - Reshevsky 170. Geller - Bronstein 171. Kotov - Gligoric

255 257 259 259 262 263 264 265 267 270 271 272 274 276 283 286 289 291 294 295 297 299 300 302 304 306 307 308 310 311 311 314 317 319 320 iv

172. Boleslavsky - Taimanov 173. Stahlberg - Najdorf 174. Euwe - Petrosian 175. Szabo - Averbakh ROUND TWENTY-SIX 176. Averbakh - Euwe 177. Petrosian - Stahlberg 178. Najdorf - Boleslavsky 179. Taimanov - Kotov 180. Gligoric - Geller 181. Bronstein - Smyslov 182. Reshevsky - Keres ROUND TWENTY-SEVEN 183. Keres - Bronstein 184. Smyslov - Gligoric 185. Geller - Taimanov 186. Kotov - Najdorf 187. Boleslavsky - Petrosian 188. Stahlberg - Averbakh 189. Euwe - Szabo ROUND TWENTY-EIGHT 190. Szabo - Stahlberg 191. Averbakh - Boleslavsky 192. Petrosian - Kotov 193. Najdorf - Geller 194. Taimanov - Smyslov 195. GIigoric - Keres 196. Bronstein - Reshevsky ROUND TWENTY-NINE 197. Reshevsky - Gligoric 198. Keres - Taimanov 199. Smyslov - Najdorf 200. Geller - Petrosian 201. Kotov - Averbakh 202. Boleslavsky - Szabo 203. Stahlberg - Euwe ROUND THIRTY 204. Averbakh - Geller 205. Petrosian - Smyslov 206. Taimanov - Reshevsky

323 327 330 330 332 334 336 339 341 343 344 345 346 346 348 351 351 353 355 355 357 357 359 359 362 365 366 369 369 370 370 372 373 373 373

207. Euwe - Boleslavsky 208. Gligoric - Bronstein 209. Szabo - Kotov 210. Najdorf - Keres Crosstable Index of Players Round-by-Round Progressive Scores

374 375 376 378 380 382 384

v

ROUND ONE 1. Szabo - Geller (Catalan Opening) I have long suspected, whenever the books I have read began discussing darksquare weaknesses or an attack on the dark squares, that the subject under discussion was not only beyond my understanding, but beyond the author's as well. "Certainly,", I would say to myself, "it must be true that the enemy dark squares will be weak if his pawns stand on light squares and he loses his dark-square bishop. But if he then removes all of his pieces from the dark squares, what will be left for me to attack?" Such was my line of reasoning, until the day I realized that a weakness of the dark squares is also a weakness of the pieces and pawns on the light squares. Lightsquare weaknesses are also possible, resulting in a weakening of the enemy pieces and pawns on the dark squares as occurred, for example, in the Geller - Najdorf game in Round 13. The point of an attack on the dark squares is that, by placing my pawns and pieces on the dark, I attack my opponent's pieces and pawns on the light. The Szabo - Geller game provides a clear example of the method of exploiting a darksquare weakness; and the combination which was possible after Black's 24th fairly begs to be included in a textbook, taking place as it does entirely on light squares. 1. c2-c4 g8-f6 2. g2-g3 e7-e6 3. f1-g2 d7-d5 4. d2-d4 d5:c4 5. d1-a4+ b8-d7 1

6. g1-f3 a7-a6 7. a4:c4 b7-b5 8. c4-c6 ... Having hatched a plan to weaken the enemy dark squares, Szabo undertakes a delicate maneuver aimed at bringing about the exchange of the darksquare bishops, which will further strengthen his grip on the dark squares. 8. ... a8-b8 9. c1-f4 f6-d5 10. f4-g5 f8-e7 11. g5:e7 d8:e7 12. O-O c8-b7 13. c6-c2 c7-c5 14. d4:c5 d7:c5 15. f1-c1 b8-c8 16. b1-c3 d5-f6 A small but serious inaccuracy: Black removes this piece from the main theater of operations. Additionally, the combination 17. :b5 ab 18. b4 now becomes possible, due to the insufficiently protected rook at c8. Szabo, however, continues with his plan, fixing the pawns at a6 and b5 on their light squares. 16. ... b6 would have been much better for Black: increasing his control of c4 would have made it more difficult for White to decide on b2-b4. 17. b2-b4 c5-a4 18. c2-b3 a4:c3 19. c1:c3 c8:c3 20. b3:c3 O-O 21. a1-c1 f8-d8 Geller cannot take the c-file away from his opponent, for if 21. ... c8, White would simply take the rook: 22. :c8+ :c8 23. :c8+ e8 24. e5!, and there is no stopping 25. c6. 22. a2-a3 f6-d5 Seeing that White's positional squeeze could become very dangerous, should he succeed in

occupying the seventh rank or in establishing his knight on c5, Geller decides to complicate (his move also stops both threats). 23. c3-d4 f7-f6 24. f3-e1 e6-e5 25. d4-c5 ... A consistent, though rather uninspired, continuation. 25. a7! would certainly have been much prettier, retaining his hold on the dark squares while attacking the enemy pieces and pawns on the light squares. Black would be unable to smoke the queen out, since 25. ... a8 would obviously fail against 26. :d5+; while after 25. ... f8 26. d3 a8 27. c5, the exchange of queens would bring the white knight to c5. And finally, 25. ... d7 brings on an elegant little combination: 26. :b7! If Black takes the queen, then 27. :d5+, followed by 28. c8+ leads to the complete extermination of Black's pieces curiously enough, all of them perish on light squares. Black may have intended to answer 25. a7 with 25. ... e4, and if 26. :e4, not 26. ... f4? (which would be nicely refuted by 27. f3), but simply 26. ... :e4 27. :b7 :e2, wi

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