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  • Discipline Specific Vocabulary

    Philosophical assumption Counterargument Rhetoric / rhetorical devices Pathos Ethos Logos Register Farce Paradox Antithesis Epiphany Caesura Mock epic Aesthetic purpose Aesthetic quality Dystopia Parody Romanticism Pastoral Realism Plagiarism Literary criticism Cognate Medieval literature Ode Consonance Credibility of sources Hierarchic structure Claim Deductive / inductive reasoning

    12 twelfth grade

    Language Arts

    COURSE ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

    COURSE DESCRIPTION

    How do the historical, political and cultural events in a society inform its literature? How do aspects of literature make it globally relevant? What components of a societys ideals are reflected in its literature? What elements do fictional and informational texts share?

    Students will read, analyze, and evaluate a variety of texts which provide a global perspective. Literature from Western, Southern, and Northern Europe will be the basis for the course of study. US documents influenced by European philosophy or action and at least one Shakespearean play will be studied. Writing, critical thinking, grammar, and language skills will be emphasized. In addition, students will complete the Graduation Project product, portfolio, and presentation as a component of English IV. By the end of twelfth grade, students must read and comprehend literary and informational texts at the high end of the grades 11-12 text complexity band (Lexile range 1215-1355) independently and proficiently. Students may need scaffolding at the high end of the range to assist in their ability to proficiently read and comprehend texts in the text complexity band. One of the key requirements of the Common Core State Standards for Reading is that all students must be able to comprehend texts of a steadily increasing complexity as they progress through school. By the time they complete the core and graduate, students must be able to read and comprehend independently and proficiently the kinds of complex texts commonly found in college and careers. The progression of Reading standard 10 defines required grade-by-grade growth in students ability to read complex texts. Students need opportunities to stretch their reading abilities and experience the satisfaction and pleasure of easy, fluent reading. The general movement during a given school year is toward texts of higher levels of complexity.

  • Unit Overview Unit Overview Time span 1 The Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Periods

    The Origins of a Nation 449-1485

    2 The English Renaissance A Celebration of Human Achievement

    1485-1660

    3 The Restoration and the 18th Century Tradition and Reason

    1660-1798

    4 The Flowering of Romanticism Emotion and Experimentation

    1798-1832

    5 The Victorians An Era of Rapid Change

    1832-1901

    6 Modern and Contemporary Literature New Ideas, New Voices

    1901-present

    Source: Holt McDougal Literature, Grade 12: British Literature. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012. Print. Vocabulary by Units Unit 1--The Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Periods: Anglo-Saxon poetry, epic poem, epic hero, kenning, caesura, anecdote, oral tradition, nuance, archetype, sound devices, universal theme, symbol, pilgrimage, aesthetic purpose, aesthetic quality, medieval literature, philosophical assumption, rhyme scheme, frame story, and prologue Unit 2The English Renaissance: iambic pentameter, act, scene, stage directions, sonnet (types), quatrain, couplet, figurative language, tragedy, tragic hero, comic relief, dialogue, drama, dramatic irony, dramatic monologue, soliloquy, blank verse, internal rhyme, rhythm Unit 3The Restoration and the 18th Century: satire, persuasion, antithesis, claim, mock epic, pathos, ethos, logos, rhetorical devices, counter argument, parody, tone, proposal, metaphysical poetry, neoclassicism, sarcasm, farce, verbal irony, philosophical assumption, rhetoric, rhetoric devices, and verisimilitude Unit 4The Flowering of Romanticism: romanticism, naturalism, symbolism, pastoral, allusion, alliteration, assonance, apostrophe, aside, ballad, blank verse, consonance, couplet, dialogue, diction, lyric, ode, epiphany, and hierarchical structure Unit 5The Victorians: industrialism, mood, realism, escapism, hyperbole, personification, and social context Unit 6Modern and Contemporary Literature: modernism, stream of consciousness, style, motivation, internal conflict, psychological fiction, dystopian, literary criticism, credibility of sources, rhythm, sound devices, screenplay

  • Unit EQs Unit 1: Essential Unit Question: What components of a society's ideals are reflected in its literature?

    Key Question: Why does literature exist? Key Question: How does the hero reflect the values of society? Key Question: What makes pieces of literature endure through time?

    Unit 2: Essential Unit Question: How do people choose what to believe? Key Question: What roles do religion and philosophy play? Key Question: How does the hero change in from the Medieval Era to the

    Renaissance? Unit 3: Essential Unit Question: How do the historical, political, and cultural events in a society inform its literature? Key Question: How can humor be used to bring about change? Key Question: How elusive is equality? Key Question: How does a writer convey his or her individual voice? Unit 4: Essential Unit Question: What does it mean to push boundaries? Key Question: How can humor be used to bring about change? Key Question: How elusive is equality? Key Question: How does a writer convey his or her individual voice Unit 5: Essential Unit Question: When is progress a problem? Key Question: Why do people fear change? Key Question: Is it better to escape or face reality?

    Key Question: How does the growth of revolution and industrialization shape Victorian literature?

    Unit 6: Essential Unit Question: How do aspects of literature make it globally relevant? Key Question: Why is there always war? Key Question: How is awareness of self present in modern and

    contemporary literature? Key Question: How can people experiment with words, and is it useful?

  • Unit 1: The Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Periods (449-1485) Essential Unit Question: What components of a society's ideals are reflected in its literature? Key Questions: 1. Why does literature exist? 2. How does the hero reflect the values of society? 3. What makes works of literature endure through time? Representative Works and Authors: Beowulf; The Canterbury Tales; A History of the English Church and People; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Anglo-Saxon/Medieval Unit Vocabulary: Anglo-Saxon poetry, epic poem, epic hero, kenning, caesura, anecdote, oral tradition, nuance, archetype, sound devices, universal theme, symbol, pilgrimage, aesthetic purpose, aesthetic quality, medieval literature, philosophical assumption, rhyme scheme, frame story, and prologue Assessment Avenues: W1 Task: Select a major work of Anglo-Saxon or Medieval literature we have read and make an argument about whether or not it is as relevant to a person in modern American society as it is to its native or originally intended audience. W2 Task: Select a character from the Canterbury Tales and explain the specific techniques of characterization used by Chaucer to create and breathe life into this particular character. Be sure to include relevant examples from the text to support your thesis. R1/R10 Task: Read closely to determine the literary devices used by authors. More than one supplementary text should be provided so students have adequate material with which to conduct a close and comprehensive examination of the ways in which various authors use such devices to develop the narrative. GP Prep Component: Create and perform a boast using kennings, caesuras, and other elements contained in readings of the period. (S6, L3) Focus Areas (sub-units, sub-topics) (1) Origins of English Literature Key Question: Why does literature exist? (2) Anglo-Saxon Literature Key Question: How does the hero reflect the values of society? (3) Medieval Literature Key Question: What makes pieces of literature endure through time? (4) Several Type 1 and 2 writings and one primary Type 3 writing assignment Unit Tasks (1) Study the historical and social contexts of this period of literature. (W2, W9a)

  • (2) Study of the nature of the epic hero and determine how Beowulf demonstrates characteristics of the archetypal epic hero (RL1, RL 10, RL 5) (3) Old English, origins, characteristics, and links to Middle and Modern English (4) Use other media to evaluate an interpretation of a text. (RL 7, RI 7) (5) Several Type 1 and 2 writings and one primary Type 3 writing assignment, possibly cause-effect (RL 1, W2) Unit Summative Assessment Possibilities: -- A traditional test on selected works from the period, including textual analysis, with both challenging multiple-choice items and written components --A W1 or W2 essay --Creative Writing, a mini-epic and/or original pilgrimage Unit 2: The English Renaissance (1485-1660) Essential Unit Question: How do people choose what to believe? Key Questions: 1. How do people choose what to believe? 2. What roles do religion and philosophy play in the literature of the period? 3. How does the hero change in from the Medieval Era to the Renaissance? Representative Works and Authors: Shakespeare's drama and sonnets; sonnets: Donne and Marvell "The Vocabulary Driven Curriculum"--Renaissance Vocabulary: iambic pentameter, act, scene, stage directions, sonnet (types), quatrain, couplet, figurative language, tragedy, tragic hero, comic relief, dialogue, drama, dramatic irony, dramatic monologue, soliloquy, blank verse, internal rhyme, rhythm, Assessment Avenues:

    W1 Task: After reading Shakespeare's ___________________, argue whether the theme of the text was heavily influenced by the historical/political/cultural events of the time, and support your position with evidence from the text. Be sure to acknowledge competing views. W 2 Task: Applying knowledge of Shakespearean language, as well as structure, meter, rhythm, and rhyme, and proper form, write a sonnet expressing your emotional state. R1/R10 Task: Read and annotate a text to determine how authors use guiding philosophical ideas as a foundation for their narrative. More than one supplementary text should be provided so students have adequate material with which to conduct a close and comprehensive examination of the ways in which various authors incorporate philosophical ideas to develop the narrative.

  • GP Prep Component: Using a visual aid, students will present their sonnet to the class and give an overview on the process of creating it. Focus Areas (sub-units, sub-topics) (1) Poetry (2) Drama (3) Several Type 1 and 2 writings and one primary Type 3 writing assignment Unit Tasks

    (1) Study the historical and social contexts of this period. (W2, W9a) (2) Analyze impact of word choice in creating meaning within Shakespearean drama by doing a close reading that determines how Shakespeare makes his work particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful (RL 1, RL 4) (3) Adapt speech and writing to a variety of contexts and formats to mimic that of Shakespeare's work (W5)

    (4) Several Type 1 and 2 writings and one primary Type 3 writing assignment, possibly information/explanatory/analysis (S6)

    Unit Summative Assessment Possibilities: -- A traditional test on a Shakespeare play, including textual analysis, with both challenging multiple-choice items and written components --A W1 or W2 essay --Using one of Shakespeares plays as a model, create an original character of substance that will fit into the play, write your character into at least one act of the play, and be prepared to present a 3 to 5 minute monologue of your character for the class. (Rubrics should be created for both the written and performance parts of this assessment.) -- Based on works we have covered this year, select a character in a position of leadership and drawing upon the contents of Machiavellis The Prince, compose a letter of advice to a this character based on observations and strategies taken from Machiavellis treatise. Unit 3: The Restoration and 18th Century (1660-1798) Essential Unit Question: How do the historical, political, and cultural events in a society inform its literature? Key Questions: 1. How can humor be used to bring about change? 2. How elusive is equality? 3. How does a writer convey his or her individual voice? Representative Works and Authors: Swift, Gulliver's Travels and "A Modest Proposal"; Pope, "The Rape of the Lock"; Candide; nonfiction, The Prince

  • "The Vocabulary Driven Curriculum"--Restoration/19th Century Vocabulary: satire, persuasion, antithesis, claim, mock epic, pathos, ethos, logos, rhetorical devices, counter argument, parody, tone, proposal, metaphysical poetry, neoclassicism, sarcasm, farce, verbal irony, philosophical assumption, rhetoric, rhetoric devices, and verisimilitude Possible Assessment Avenues: W1 Task: After researching a variety of texts on a current societal problem, create a satire suggesting an absurd solution. Mimic the argumentative style of one of the authors we have studies. W2 Task: Write an essay discussing how social, economic, political, and cultural factors prevalent during this time period helped to create an ideal environment for satirical writings. R1/R10 Task: Read closely to determine how an author treats the idea of equality. Provide students adequate material with which to conduct a comprehensive examination of the ways in which segments of society are marginalized and denied equal rights and determine commonalities in their struggle for equality. GP Prep Component: Identify a social problem or issue of personal concern, name a person in a position of authority who has the ability to change or influence that problem, and write a persuasive letter to that person making a specific appeal for some type of change.(W4, W5) Focus Areas (sub-units, sub-topics)

    (1) Satire (2) Persuasion (3) Mock Epic (4) Several Type 1 and 2 writings and one primary Type 3 writing assignment Unit Tasks (1) Study the historical and social contexts of this period. (RI 3)

    (2) Create satire in order to persuade an audience of your particular point of view. (W 1, W 4) (3) Be able to recognize fine distinctions between what is said and what is meant (denotation and connotation), specifically in regards to satire (RL 6) (4) Several Type 1 and 2 writings and one primary Type 3 writing assignment, argumentation/problem-solution

    Unit Summative Assessment Possibilities: --Write an original, substantial work of satire related to a significant issue or problem. --Write an essay in which you show how one or more works of satire from this literary period led to a significant impact on cultural, economic, and/or political circumstances of the era. Unit 4: The Flowering of Romanticism (1798-1832)

  • Essential Unit Question: What does it mean to push boundaries? Key Questions: 1. In what ways was Romanticism a rebellion against neoclassicism? 2. How elusive is equality? 3. How does a writer convey his or her individual voice? Representative Works and Authors: Romantic Poets (Blake, Coleridge, Bryon, Keats, Shelley); Brontes: Wuthering Heights, Jane Eyre. [Please Note: Although chronologically the Brontes appear in the Victorian section of the Holt text, their works contain elements much more akin to the Romantic period, which is why they are being included in this section.] "The Vocabulary Driven Curriculum"--Romanticism Vocabulary: romanticism, naturalism, symbolism, pastoral, allusion, alliteration, assonance, apostrophe, aside, ballad, blank verse, consonance, couplet, dialogue, diction, lyric, ode, epiphany, and hierarchical structure Possible Assessment Avenues: W1: Of the Romantic authors read in class, which one seems the most provocative, or willing to push the boundaries, of societal norms? Support your response using evidence from various works by the same author. W2 Task: Analyze how an author uses sound devices to help create meaning in a work of literature. R1/R10 Task: Read closely to determine how an author treats the idea of individuality. Provide students adequate material with which to conduct a comprehensive examination of the ways in which segments of society are marginalized. GP Prep Component: Socratic Seminar (relates to anticipation of review panel questions, probing a topic more deeply) Focus Areas (sub-units, sub-topics) (1) Blooming of the novel as a genre (2) Romantic Poetry (3) The Gothic (4) Several Type 1 and 2 writings and one primary Type 3 writing assignment Unit Tasks (1) Study the historical and social contexts of this period. (RI 3)

    (2) Track the emergence of the importance of the individual during this period. (RL 9) (3) Using complex texts from the Romantic period, draw inferences citing textual evidence while working independently (R1, R10)

  • (4) Several Type 1 and 2 writings and one primary Type 3 writing assignment, possibly a creative writing assignment/original sonnet with presentation

    Unit Summative Assessment Possibilities: --Written analysis of a major poem, pastoral or sonnet (W2) --Creative Writing: Write an original Shakespearean, Petrarchan, or Spenserian sonnet using the correct format, meter (iambic pentameter), and rhyme scheme. Unit 5: The Victorians (1832-1901) Essential Unit Question: When is progress a problem? Key Questions: 1. Why do people fear change? 2. Is it better to escape or face reality? 3. How does the growth of revolution and industrialization shape Victorian literature? Representative Works and Authors: Dickens, Tennyson's poetry, George Eliot; Chekov. "The Vocabulary Driven Curriculum"--Victorian Vocabulary: industrialism, mood, realism, escapism, hyperbole, personification, and social context Possible Assessment Avenues: W1 Task: After reading a particular piece of Victorian literature (fiction), argue whether society is shaped by the power of a few or the struggles of many. Cite evidence from the texts to support your stance. W2 Task: Choose a piece of literature we have studied in class. With a partner, create a visual display to show how social events of the time impacted how this particular piece of literature was written. R1/R10 Task: Read closely to determine examples of how the political stances influence and are influenced by cultural and social ideals. Provide students adequate material with which to conduct a comprehensive examination of the ways in which political issues mirror social change. GP Prep Component: Create a poster or other type of visual aid reflecting an issue of the Victorian Era. Focus Areas (sub-units, sub-topics) (1) Social Issues of the Day (2) Victorian Poetry (3) Victorian Novel (Bridge between Romantic and Victorian) (4) Several Type 1 and 2 writings and one primary Type 3 writing assignment Unit Tasks

  • (1) Study the historical and social contexts of this period. (RI 3) (2) Analyses and application of theme in specific works of Victorian literature (RL 2) (3) Write text to convey complex contexts fairly and accurately through effective selection, organization, and analysis of content from the Victorian era (W 2). (4) Use visual aids, which may include technology, to add understanding and add interest to a topic (S 5). (5) Several Type 1 and 2 writings and one primary Type 3 writing assignment, possibly information/explanatory/analysis

    Unit Summative Assessment Possibilities: --Write a research paper on the influence of social, historical, political, and/or economic contexts and a work of literature from the period. Unit 6: Modern and Contemporary Literature (1901-Present) Essential Unit Question: How do aspects of literature make it globally relevant? Key Questions: 1. In what ways does modern literature reflect modern life? 2. What are some direct and indirect influences of war and/or social conflict on modern and contemporary literature? 3. Why does internal conflict play such a significant role in many works of modern literature? Representative Works and Authors: James Joyce, (novels short stories); Dylan Thomas, Virginia Woolf, Joseph Conrad; George Orwell (novels and short stories) "The Vocabulary Driven Curriculum"--Modern Vocabulary: modernism, stream of consciousness, style, motivation, internal conflict, psychological fiction, dystopian, literary criticism, credibility of sources, rhythm, sound devices, screenplay, Possible Assessment Avenues: W1: Should we fear change? After reading one or more works of Modern/Contemporary literature, argue whether the change present the works is positive or negative. Give examples from the text to support your point of view of whether the changes presented in the works are frightening or exciting. W2: After reading Lawrence's "The Rocking Horse Winner," analyze the story based on the following question: What could the adult s in the story have done to prevent Paul's death? Analyze the steps each adult could have taken to save him, and discuss specific scenes in the story to point out what the characters could have done differently. R1/R10 Task: Read closely to determine examples of how the societal stances influence and are influenced by war. Provide students adequate material with which to conduct a comprehensive examination of the ways in which modern issues mirror historical conflict.

  • GP Prep Component: Practice presentations, including choreography and at least one visual aid. Focus Areas (sub-units, sub-topics) (1) War (2) Personal Narrative (3) Experimental Literature (4) Several Type 1 and 2 writings and one primary Type 3 writing assignment, possibly narrative/informational/explanatory/synthesis Unit Tasks (1) Study the historical and social contexts of this period (RI 3).

    (2) Read and comprehend literary nonfiction independently and proficiently, using specific textual evidence to support opinions and conclusions drawn from texts (RL1, RL10, RI 1, RI 10). (3) Demonstrate how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes and topics (RL 9). (4) Several Type 1 and 2 writings and one primary Type 3 writing assignment

    Unit Summative Assessment --Literary criticism. In a well-written essay determine how two or more themes interact with one another to produce a complex account of a story.

  • W1 R1/R10 Read closely to determine what a text says explicitly and make logical inferences based on that information. Cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn using a variety of texts from British/World Literature.

    Please note that texts are to be considered in the broader sense of the term, so they are not limited to print media, but may include online, audio, video, art, and other methods of communication.

    Supplementary texts should include a current and global perspective not addressed in the textbook and correlate to the materials provided. Resources for such texts can be found in Discovery Ed, reliable websites, student-selected readings of appropriate complexity and topic, etc.

    After reading and analyzing a variety of texts from British/World literature, write well-written expository (informative/explanatory) essays which examine complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately.

    --After reading a Shakespearean, Elizabethan, Italian, or Spenserian sonnet, analyze how an author uses sound devices such as meter, rhythm, rhyme, alliteration, assonance, and consonance to help create meaning in the poem.

    -- After reading Lawrence's "The Rocking Horse Winner," analyze the story based on the following question: What could adults in the story have done to prevent Paul's death? Analyze the steps each adult could have taken to save him, and discuss specific scenes in the story to point out what the characters could have done differently.

    After reading and analyzing British/World literature sources, write an essay using arguments to support a claim or claims based on valid reasoning and evidence drawn directly from the text(s) and/or from other credible sources. Your essay must address reasonable counterclaims to your thesis.

    --Select a major work of Anglo-Saxon or Medieval literature we have read and make an argument about whether or not it is as relevant to a person in modern American society as it is to its native or originally intended audience.

    --After reading a Shakespearean drama, argue whether the theme of the text was heavily influenced by the historical/political/cultural events of the time, and support your position with evidence from the text. Be sure to acknowledge competing views.

    W2

  • Charlotte Mecklenburg Library Graduation Project Support The public library is likely one of the first places you think of when it comes to doing research for an assignment like the Graduation Project. We know that this project is a significant part of your grade and also an opportunity to share what youre passionate about and interested in. Were here to help. Here are some resources the library has that can help support each component of this important project: The Paper We invite you to schedule a research appointment where you can learn more about getting started on your research project: http://www.cmlibrary.org/online/Ask_a_Librarian/ResearchSupport.asp A requirement of your essay paper is to use five different resources, primary sources being one of them. The public library, particularly Main Library on the second floor has a lot of examples of these that we can help you find. Some examples the library has include:

    speeches ephemera such as theatre programs newspaper and magazine articles advertisements photographs maps

    The Product One example of your Graduation Project product could be a video you created about the topic you researched. Studio i at ImaginOn is a music and video production facility that is available to use for creating such a product. Library staff and interns are available to show you how to get started as well as give you guidance on how to produce a quality product. For more information on the hours Studio i is available, view this link here: http://imaginon.org/Programs_&_Events/default.asp#tech The Presentation Throughout the school year, ImaginOn which is a partnership with the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library and the Childrens Theatre of Charlotte, will hold scheduled presentation skills workshops to better prepare you for the required oral presentation. Teaching artists from the Childrens Theatre of Charlotte will offer tips and feedback to help better prepare you for communicating about your project in front of the actual review panel. Check the ImaginOn programming calendar for more information at: www.imaginon.org. The Portfolio Weve got free Internet access at all of our library locations. Staff are available to help you format items such as your resum or create a PowerPoint. For more information about how the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library can assist with your Graduation Project, contact Teen Services with the Loft at ImaginOn: 704-416-4660 or [email protected] to get started.

    mailto:[email protected]

  • Conducting Effective Research

    Essential Questions: Why do research? How do students conduct research and engage in the writing process for publication?

    Essential Academic Vocabulary: -Informative -Writing Process -Authoritative Reference Brainstorm -Hyperlinks

    Document Draft -Primary source Format Outline -Secondary source

    Fact vs. Opinion Editing / revision -Database Concrete detail Publish -Bibliography Extended definition Citation -Appendix

    Multimedia Plagiarism Graphics Bibliography Format Primary source Secondary source Sample tasks that incorporate research skills

    W1 W2 R1/R10

    After reading, viewing, or hearing (list of texts) that address (topic), write (type of product), that makes a claim in which you take a stance about (topic). Provide evidence from the texts to support your claim. Example: After reading, viewing, or hearing (list of texts) that address basic human rights with global viewpoints,write an essay that makes a claim in which you take a stance about global human rights. Provide evidence from the texts to support your claim.

    After reading, viewing, or hearing (list of texts) that address (topic), write (type of product), that informs or explains (topic) to a specific audience. Provide evidence from the texts to support your explanation. Example: After reading, viewing, or hearing (list of texts) that address basic global human rights, write a letter to your local newspaper that explains food supplies in jeopardy across the world. Provide evidence from the texts to support your explanation.

    Read and annotate several texts in a comprehensive study of (topic) to gather relevant information and to understand the authors purpose and viewpoint, including bias and limitations. Make sure texts include several genres of varying viewpoints about (topic). Example: Read and annotate several texts in a comprehensive study of child labor across the world to gather relevant information and to understand the authors purpose and viewpoint, including bias and limitations. Make sure texts include several genres of varying viewpoints about child labor.

  • Meaningful Student WorkAssign students work to do that helps them get the meaning of the text. Have them participate in meaningful discussions, reread the text for a specific purpose, write about the text, or develop a visual representation or other presentation.

    Teaching Through Complex TextsTeachers should be intentional, strategic, and explicit in instruction in vocabulary, text structure, and controlling concepts. Model ways of thinking, corporate and independent reading, and writing. Provide lots of instructional support.

    Scaffold Text Type and ComplexityPair linguistically challenging texts with easier materials. A text can be intellectually challenging with less complex language and structure. Build up thinking skills so that students can tackle challenging texts independently.

    Teaching Complex

    Texts

    Teacher-reliant Students

    Independent Learners

    English IV_ Course Overview TemplateENG 12_Course DescriptionENG 12_Unit EQsENG 12_Unit List_OverviewENG 12_Unit Plans_W1_W2_R1_R10ENG 12_Unit VocabularyENG 12_W1 W2 R1 R10Charlotte Mecklenburg Library Graduation Project SupportConducting Effective Research (2)Teaching Complex Texts Pyramid