Cook Thesis Final

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This the final version of my thesis: "ALP and unions: between dependence"

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<p> UNIONS AND THE ALP Between dependence and independence Trevor Cook 2012 A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, Department of Government and International Relations, Faculty of Arts, University of Sydney </p> <p>1 </p> <p> Statement of originality This is to certify that to the best of my knowledge, the content of this thesis is my own work. This thesis has not been submitted for any degree or other purposes. I certify that the intellectual content of this thesis is the product of my own work and that all the assistance received in preparing this thesis and sources has been acknowledged. Trevor Cook </p> <p>2 </p> <p>Table of Contents Acknowledgements.............................................................................................................5 Abbreviations .......................................................................................................................6 List of Tables .........................................................................................................................9 Abstract................................................................................................................................ 11 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................ 12 CHAPTER 2: LITERATURE REVIEW............................................................................. 19 1. Introduction ............................................................................................................................19 2. Union decline and de-linking.............................................................................................20 3. Party type and individualism ............................................................................................27 4. Relationship type and political behaviour....................................................................35 5. Union revitalisation and strategic choice......................................................................46 6. Political independence and dependence.......................................................................50 7. Conclusion................................................................................................................................54 CHAPTER 3: APPROACH AND METHODS .................................................................. 55 1. Introduction ............................................................................................................................55 2. Research questions ...............................................................................................................58 3. Previous studies.....................................................................................................................59 4. Case study research ..............................................................................................................64 5. Qualitative interviews..........................................................................................................68 6. Other data sources ................................................................................................................77 7. Conclusion................................................................................................................................78 CHAPTER 4: FRAGMENTATION .................................................................................... 79 1. Introduction ............................................................................................................................79 2. Australian exceptionalism..................................................................................................81 3. Federalism ...............................................................................................................................85 4. Union movement structure ................................................................................................94 5. Sectarianism, ideological conflict and factionalism ..................................................98 6. Conclusion............................................................................................................................. 103 CHAPTER 5: TWO RELATIONSHIPS ..........................................................................104 1. Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 104 2. A question of balance ........................................................................................................ 105 3. Three perspectives............................................................................................................. 118 4. Current and former union officials............................................................................... 122 5. Social partner versus pressure group ......................................................................... 124 6. Union status and attitudes............................................................................................... 129 7. Conclusion............................................................................................................................. 130 CHAPTER 6: UNION REVITALISATION .....................................................................131 1. Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 131 2. Revitalisation ....................................................................................................................... 133 3. Generational change.......................................................................................................... 139 4. Re-thinking the Accord ..................................................................................................... 143 5. Unity........................................................................................................................................ 150 3 </p> <p>6. Scepticism ............................................................................................................................. 155 7. Conclusion............................................................................................................................. 163 </p> <p>CHAPTER 7: ALP AFFILIATION...................................................................................165 1. Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 165 2. Re-defining the relationship .......................................................................................... 167 3. Affiliation patterns............................................................................................................. 171 4. Affiliation exclusivity ........................................................................................................ 178 5. Connections .......................................................................................................................... 192 6. Non-affiliation...................................................................................................................... 200 7. Caucus attitudes .................................................................................................................. 203 8. Conclusion............................................................................................................................. 212 CHAPTER 8: BENEFIT EXCHANGES ...........................................................................213 1. Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 213 2. Benefit exchanges and relationship types ................................................................. 214 3. External symmetry............................................................................................................. 216 4. Internal symmetry ............................................................................................................. 226 5. Predictability ....................................................................................................................... 229 6. Conclusion............................................................................................................................. 234 CHAPTER 9: YOUR RIGHTS AT WORK AND BEYOND ..........................................235 1. Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 235 2. 2007 election........................................................................................................................ 236 3. Campaign elements............................................................................................................ 246 4. Policy benefits...................................................................................................................... 254 5. A moment in time ............................................................................................................... 257 6. A second act? ........................................................................................................................ 260 7. Conclusion............................................................................................................................. 264 CHAPTER 10: CONCLUSION .........................................................................................266 Appendices .......................................................................................................................272 Appendix 1: Interview questions .................................................................................................. 272 Appendix 2: ALP vote share (1901 - 2010): federal and major states.......................... 273 Appendix 3: ALP MPs, House of Representatives 2011: union backgrounds ............ 275 Appendix 4: Second Gillard Ministry: union backgrounds................................................. 280 Bibliography.....................................................................................................................283 </p> <p>4 </p> <p>Acknowledgements On an afternoon walk at Kilcare some years ago, John Edwards told me that a PhD provided a rare opportunity to study a subject in a structured way. It was a tantalising prospect for someone who had spent the past few decades working on projects that rarely lasted more than a few hours or a few weeks. The past three and a half years have been an enjoyable taste of the scholastic life. The journey was all the better because I was able to share it with a supportive group of fellow research students. In particular, I was delighted to find two other Hawke Government staffers, Stephen Mills and Judy Betts, as well as another Canberra old hand, Stewart Jackson, in my student cohort. The company of political insiders (old hacks) was like a reassuring balm on many occasions. I would like to thank the staff of the Government and International Relations Department at the University of Sydney for their encouragement and guidance including Anika Gauja, Robert Howard, Michael Jackson, and Rodney Smith. Most of all, I owe a large debt of gratitude to my supervisor, Ariadne Vromen, who has provided generous, timely and extremely helpful advice throughout. I also thank the interviewees, who gave freely of their time and insights. I suspect many will not agree with my conclusions. I also thank the many colleagues, friends and acquaintances with whom I have discussed, debated and argued many of the ideas in this thesis over the past few decades. I wish to thank three other people; my old friend, Robert Hinds, without his encouragement and practical support I may never have completed a first degree all those years ago; my wife, Julie Flynn, whose generosity, encouragement and tolerance made it possible for me to undertake a doctorate; and, finally, my father, Ray Cook, who gave me an interest in labour politics, a life-long love of learning and an incurable attraction to the beauty of ideas. </p> <p>5 </p> <p>Abbreviations ABCC Accord Australian Building and Construction Commission The Prices and Incomes Accord between the ACTU and the ALP ACSPA Australian Council of Salaried and Professional Associations ACTU AEU ANF AFL-CIO Australian Council of Trade Unions Australian Education Union Australian Nursing Federation American Federation of Labor Congress of Industrial Organisations AIRC AFPC ALAC ALP Australian Industrial Relations Commission Australian Fair Pay Commission Australian Labor Advisory Committee Australian Labor Party Australian Manufacturing Workers Union Australian Nursing Federation Association of Professional Engineers, Scientists and Managers Australia ASU Australian Services Union Australian Workers Union </p> <p>AMWU ANF APESMA </p> <p>AWU </p> <p>6 </p> <p>BCA BLP </p> <p>Business Council of Australia British Labour Party Council of Australian Government Employees Organisation </p> <p>CAGEO </p> <p>CFMEU CIS </p> <p>Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union Centre for Independent Studies Community and Public Sector Union Change to Win Group (USA) Democratic Labour Party Federal Parliamentary Labor Party (caucus) Financial Services Union House of Representatives Health Services Union Independent Education Union Institute of Public Affairs Labor Council of NSW (now UnionsNSW) Labor Electoral League Liquor, Hospitality and Miscellaneous Workers Union (now UnitedVoice) </p> <p>CPSU CTW DLP </p> <p>FPLP FSU </p> <p>HoR HSU IEU IPA </p> <p>LCNSW LEL LHMU </p> <p>LNP MP </p> <p>Liberal National Party Coalition Member of Parliament </p> <p>7 </p> <p>MUA NGO NSW NTEU NUW NZ </p> <p>Maritime Union of Australia Non-government organisation New South Wales National Tertiary Education Union National Union of Workers New Zealand New Zealand Labour Party One Big Union Office of the Employment Advocate Shop, Distributive and Allied Industries Union Service Employees International Union (USA) Trades and Labour Council Trade Union Congress (UK) Transport Workers Union United Firefighters Union United Kingdom United States of America Victorian Trades Hall Council Western Australia Waterside Workers...</p>