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  1. 1. Conversation Triggers:Sparking Conversations withAdvertising & MediaEd KellerCEO, Keller Fay GroupTwitter.com/kellerfay Insert PhotoEmily VanidesVP Connections Research& AnalyticsMediaVest Insert PhotoJune 13, 2011
  2. 2. Word of Mouth is PowerfulThe rewards of pursuing excellence in word-of-mouth are huge, and it can deliver a significant competitive edge few othermarketing approaches can match Its the most disruptive factor in marketing Marketing-induced consumer-to-consumer word of mouthgenerates more than twice the sales of paid advertisingMcKinsey Quarterly, April, 20102
  3. 3. But What Sparks Conversation? Many assume WOM is generated by great brand experiences Highly satisfied customers become evangelists for brands. However, marketing often sparks WOM, as well Half of conversations about brands refer to media/marketing. To maximizing WOM, we need a clear sense of how marketingcan most effectively trigger conversations. Which media, at what time of day, in what venues, and relating to what topics of conversation?3
  4. 4. WOM is at the core of SMGs approachto marketing communicationsSimplifying humanunderstanding to delivermeaningful brand experiences Our framework for designing experiences that matter4
  5. 5. Ultimately, brands need to be apart of the conversation We live in a networked world The role of marketing is to be a spark in thecommunities where people live and play We have to harness the power of peoples sharedpurpose & voice Weaving into the fabric that bonds people togetherWe must listen & understand the conversations and how we can trigger them 5
  6. 6. We looked to our partners at KellerFay to provide new insights 5+ year partnership with SMG Proven approach to WOM tracking and analysis Inclusive of both online AND offline International perspective Successful and market-leading insights into therelationships between marketing and brand WOM E.g. Super Bowl, Olympics, Cross-media studies, etc6
  7. 7. Multiple Data Sources: TalkTrack TalkTrack Methodology TalkTrack is a diary-based survey program that measures all forms of word of mouth (WOM) offline + online. Respondents keep a diary of conversations over a 24-hour period, and then take an online survey where they report on these conversations. TalkTrack US A national syndicated program involving 36,000 consumers aged 13 to 69 annually. The majority of TalkTrack US results presented in this analysis are derived from interviews collected during November 2009 to October 2010, and during this time a total of 36,622 respondents participated. TalkTrack Britain Study was fielded online in May 2010. A total sample of 2,578 16 to 69 year olds participated in the first wave of this study. TalkTrack Australia Study was fielded online in April May 2010. A total sample of 2,829 16 to 69 year olds participated in this study.7
  8. 8. Multiple Data Sources:IPA TouchPoints 3 Unique and original survey of 5,400 British adults aged 15+ Information gathered through individual PDA diaries and self-completionquestionnaires. The findings presented here focus on the diary portion of TP3. The diary records information on a half hourly basis on the following: Location of respondent Who they were with What they were doing (consuming media, communicating, etc.) What media they were consuming Their mood Research was conducted during September 2009 through February 2010. 8
  9. 9. Regardless of Market (or Category),Offline Conversations Dominate How Brand Conversations Take Place US = 7% Britain = 7% Australia = 7%US = 91%Britain = 92%Australia = 91%Source: TalkTrack: US, July 2009 June 2010; Australia, April 2010, Britain, May 2010 9
  10. 10. Presentation to Cover What triggers WOM, according to consumers Role of media/marketing in WOM10
  11. 11. (TalkTrack Australia)What Triggers WOM,According to Consumers Which one of the following comes closest to describing what prompted or sparked the conversation? Something else generally relatesto neutral orfactual talk aboutbrand experiencesor purchase plans.Base: Conversations (All WOM, n=17,653)Source: Keller Fay Groups TalkTrack Australia, April May 201011
  12. 12. (TalkTrack Australia)Important Differences inWOM Triggers by CategoryWhat Sparked The ConversationRanked by All WOM Results on Previous SlideBase: Conversations (Beauty & Personal Care, n=634; Beverages, n=1,390; Technology, n=1,368; Financial, n=1,003)Note: Percentages will not add to 100% because something else is not shown. These figures are 32%, 46%, 27%, and 42%, respectively.Source: Keller Fay Groups TalkTrack Australia, April May 201012
  13. 13. (TalkTrack Australia)Good Experiences DriveThree Times More WOM than Bad WOM about positive experiences is more likely to be shared with others than WOM about negative experiences. What Sparked The Conversation Sharing an ExperienceGood-Bad Experience Ratio:Beauty & Personal Care 7:1Beverages 5:1 Technology 3:1Financial Services 1:120% of all WOM isdriven by sharing anexperience three- quarters of which is good.Base: Conversations (All WOM, n=17,653)Source: Keller Fay Groups TalkTrack Australia, April May 2010 13
  14. 14. (TalkTrack US)Positive, Strong EmotionsTrigger the Most WOMSummary Table: WOM Topics Surfacing in Each Category by Pass-Along LikelihoodBeauty & Personal CareBeverages Topics Surfacing in Each Category Highly LikelyNot Likely Highly LikelyNot Likely Superlative Brand Enthusiasm (Love, Excellent)10% 6%11% 6% General Brand Enthusiasm (Great, Good)15%11%11% 11% General Like /Think Brand is OK 8% 7%10% 11% Brand Criticism (Terrible, Bad, Hate, Worst)3% 5%2%5% Brand Reputation (Positive) 6% 4%2%2% Brand Works Well 14% 9%17%*11%* Brand Does Not Work Well3% 6% 3%*3%* Purchase Decision10%10%15% 17% Need The Brand 10% 7%5%5% Want The Brand1% 3%5%5%*For Works Well for beverages examined tastes good and brand hydrates, wakes me up, etc.**For Works Well we examined rate of return/earning interest and positive feedback on customer service, since finance is a services oriented category. Doesnt Work Well is negative customer service.***For Cost examined charges/fees/interest/rates positive and negative.Note: Shading denotes statistical significance at the 90% confidence level.Source: Keller Fay Groups TalkTrack, October 2009 September 201014
  15. 15. (TalkTrack US)Positive Emotions Also Key Triggerfor Tech & Financial WOM Summary Table: WOM Topics Surfacing in Each Category by Pass-Along Likelihood TechnologyFinancial Topics Surfacing in Each Category Highly LikelyNot Likely Highly Likely Not Likely Superlative Brand Enthusiasm (Love, Excellent)11% 5%6%3% General Brand Enthusiasm (Great, Good)25%18%13% 7% General Like /Think Brand is OK 5% 5%2%2% Brand Criticism (Terrible, Bad, Hate, Worst)7% 9%14%11% Brand Reputation (Positive) 8% 3%3%1% Brand Works Well5% 2% 5%**4%** Brand Does Not Work Well1% 3% 3%**5%** Purchase Decision 5% 6% N/AN/A Need The Brand2% 1% N/A N/A Want The Brand6% 2% N/AN/A*For Works Well for beverages examined tastes good and brand hydrates, wakes me up, etc.**For Works Well we examined rate of return/earning interest and positive feedback on customer service, since finance is a services oriented category. Doesnt Work Well is negative customer service.***For Cost examined charges/fees/interest/rates positive and negative.Note: Shading denotes statistical significance at the 90% confidence level.Source: Keller Fay Groups TalkTrack, October 2009 September 201015
  16. 16. (TalkTrack US)Media Play a Big Role inDriving WOM ~ Half of consumer brand conversationsrefer to marketing or media led by television (17%) Internet (15%) point of sale (9%) newspapers (6%) magazines (5%) direct mail/email (5%)Marketing and media are tools for encouraging WOMSource: Keller Fay Groups TalkTrack, November 2009 October 2010 16
  17. 17. (TalkTrack US) Which Media that Trigger WOM? Plan by CategoryMedia and Marketing References(% of WOM conversations citing media or marketing; top 3 references highlighted) Beauty &Financial All WOM Personal Beverages TechnologyServices Care Brand Mentions Involving52%59%44%55%41% One or More References* Television 17%15%12%13% 8%Internet15%13% 8%26%19% Point Of Sale 9%14%15%12% 4%Magazines are Promotion8%18%12%6%3%disproportionately referenced inNewspaper6% 6% 5%6%5%beauty WOM. Direct Mail/E-Marketing 5% 5% 3%5% 10% Magazine5% 9% 4%6%3% Any Other Ad3% 3% 3%3%3%Radio3% 3% 3%3%3%Billboard2% 2% 2%2%1% Base: Brand Mentions (All WOM, n=170,380; Beauty, n=7,361; Technology, n=13,523; Beverages, n=17,822; Financial Services, n=8,324) *Up to two media/marketing references can be selected so figures will not add to this total row. Source: Keller Fay Groups TalkTrack, November 2009 October 201017
  18. 18. Introducing theMedia Sociability Index Which media give advertisers the best access to consumers whilethey are in a conversational mode? Based on proximity of media use and conversation. TouchPoints3 (UK) is data source. The Media Sociability Index reveals highly sociable media. This is an index which compares those consuming media and communicating with the average percentage of people communicating at any given half-hour interval over the course of the day.18
  19. 19. (IPA TouchPoints 3)Conversations Happen More Often atTimes When Media are Being Consumed The baseline Media Sociability Index for conversations is 141 (based on 45% divided by 32%). All Forms of Conversation (Offline or Online)Media Sociability Index*** = 141% of Total Adults Having% of People Consuming Media ConversationsWho Are Simultaneously**During Each Half Hour Conversing with Others Offline or(Average Day*)Online (Average Day)*An average of the average percentage of offline./online or offline conversations during each half hour was taken to arrive at this figure.**Same half hour***Media Sociability Index comp