Continuing Art Education for Adults || Front Matter

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<ul><li><p>National Art Education Association</p><p>Front MatterSource: Art Education, Vol. 18, No. 9, Continuing Art Education for Adults (Dec., 1965), p. 1Published by: National Art Education AssociationStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3190646 .Accessed: 10/06/2014 07:46</p><p>Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms &amp; Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p> .JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.</p><p> .</p><p>National Art Education Association is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to ArtEducation.</p><p>http://www.jstor.org </p><p>This content downloaded from 91.229.248.162 on Tue, 10 Jun 2014 07:46:12 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=naeahttp://www.jstor.org/stable/3190646?origin=JSTOR-pdfhttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsphttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p></li><li><p>art education DECEMBER 1965/VOLUME 18/NUMBER 9 JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL ART EDUCATION ASSOCIATION </p><p>This content downloaded from 91.229.248.162 on Tue, 10 Jun 2014 07:46:12 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p></li><li><p>- JQ u </p><p>acrylic polymer emulsion </p><p>FROM TRADITIONAL TO NEW POLYMER EMULSION, the Coming Universal Art Medium </p><p>It is versatile: used for outstanding watercolor, casein, tempera, oil techniques; for printing, resist, collage, even sculptural techniques, and more. It is convenient: </p><p>thins with water, cleans with water, is non-toxic, works on any non-oily surface, dries fast for quick response and no storage problems. It is permanent and more brilliant </p><p>than any other medium: dries to water resistant matte or high gloss surface, will not yellow; impastos remain flexible, will not crack. And there is much more: write for free. </p><p>booklet, brochure on techniques, and color card on LIQUITEX Acrylic Polymer Emulsion-the first polymer pigmented for artists, and the only polymer colors produced with body like oil paint in roll-up metal tubes, and also with a tempera body in jars. </p><p>The above is LIQUITEX Colors used in a watercolor technique. LIQUITEX Colors come in 2-ounce tubes (50% greater volume than standard studio tubes) and in 2-ounce to quart jars. </p><p>PERMANENT PIGMENTS, INC. 2700 Highland Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 45212 </p><p>This content downloaded from 91.229.248.162 on Tue, 10 Jun 2014 07:46:12 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p></li><li><p>DECEMBER 1965 / VOLUME XVIII / NO. 9 </p><p>EDITOR: Charles M. Dorn </p><p>ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Jack Hammond </p><p>NAEA OFFICERS: </p><p>President: Ralph G. Beelke President-elect: Ruth M. Ebken </p><p>Past President: Edward L. Mattil </p><p>NAEA BOARD OF DIRECTORS: </p><p>Michael F. Andrews John C. Benz </p><p>Mildred L. Fairchild Harry G. Guillaume </p><p>Mariema Miller Fred V. Mills </p><p>Jeanne Palmer Thomas J. Tramel </p><p>CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Burt Wasserman </p><p>August L. Freundlich </p><p>REGIONAL EDITORS: </p><p>Eastern: Donald Wyckoff Montvale, New Jersey Pacific: Naomi Dietz </p><p>Orange State College, Calif. Southeastern: Marylou Kuhn </p><p>Florida State University Western: James A. Schwalbach </p><p>University of Wisconsin </p><p>EDITORIAL BOARD: </p><p>Manuel Barkan Ohio State University </p><p>John C. Benz East Tennessee State University </p><p>Kenneth R. Beittel Pennsylvania State University </p><p>Ivan E. Johnson Florida State University </p><p>Pauline Johnson University of Washington </p><p>Leven C. Leatherbury San Diego City Schools </p><p>Bill C. Lockhart Texas Technological College </p><p>PRODUCTION &amp; ADVERTISING: </p><p>Jacqueline LaFleur </p><p>CIRCULATION: Eva M. Currey </p><p>DUCATIONAL RESS SSOCIATION </p><p>OF AMERICA </p><p>Published nine times a year: October, November, December, January, February, March, April, May and June by the NA- TIONAL ART EDUCATION ASSOCIATION. Subscription to non-members, $5.00 per year. Entered as Second Class Matter, February 14, 1948, at the Post Office, Kutztown, Pennsylvania, under Act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at the special postage rate stated in Sec- tion 132,122, Postal Manual, January 6, 1959. Information concerning member- ship may be secured from the Executive Secretary, 1201 Sixteenth St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20036. Opinions ex- pressed in signed articles are those of the writers and not necessarily those of the NAEA. Manuscripts are welcome at all times and may be submitted to the editorial office at 1201 16th St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20036. Indexed in The Education Index. </p><p>art education JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL ART EDUCATION ASSOCIATION </p><p>THEME ISSUE: CONTINUING ART EDUCATION FOR ADULTS </p><p>Guest Editor: Marylou Kuhn ............................. 2 An Introduction / John McHale .......................... 3 The Naturalization of American Art: Cause and Effect of a </p><p>Current Phenomenon / Alvin Toffler .................... 4 Emerging Directions in Adult Art Education / Alan B. Knox </p><p>and Roscoe L. Shields .................. ............ 25 </p><p>SYMPOSIUM: THE LOCALES OF ADULT ART EDUCATION Introduction / Marylou Kuhn ............................ 12 </p><p>LOCALE 1: URBAN (Co-sponsors: The University Center for Adult Education and the Detroit Institute of Arts) / Robert Holmes ............................................ 15 </p><p>LOCALE 2: MUSEUMS (The Detroit Institute of Arts, the Walker Arts Center and the Milwaukee Art Center) / Mary Jane Ward and Genene Sindorf ........................ 15 </p><p>LOCALE 3: PUBLIC SCHOOLS (Mott Adult Education Pro- gram, Flint, Michigan) / Eleanor Woolfe ................ 17 </p><p>LOCALE 4: COMMUNITY ART CENTERS (The LeMoyne Art Foundation) .................................... 18 </p><p>LOCALE 5: ACTIVITY DAY CENTERS A. Hospitality House in Dallas, Texas / Martha Dee Guthrie 18 B. UAW Retired Workers Centers in Detroit, Michigan / </p><p>Freida E. Gorrecht ............................... 19 LOCALE 6: MILITARY COMMUNITY CENTERS (The Army </p><p>Crafts Program) ..................................... 21 LOCALE 7: HIGHER EDUCATION </p><p>A. Its Involvement in Adult Art Education / Freda H. Goldman ....................................... 21 </p><p>B. The Demise of the Tower / James A. Schwalbach ...... 23 LOCALE 8: ARTS COUNCILS </p><p>A. Three Statements on the New York State Council on the Arts / Seymour Knox; John B. Hightower; Lucille Rhodes 24 </p><p>B. Community Arts Councils: The Detroit Adventure ...... 24 </p><p>FEATURES: </p><p>"Michelangelo: The Last Giant" / (An interview with Lou Hazam) ............... ........................... 8 </p><p>Reinhardt: The Positive Power of Negational Thinking / Burt Wasserman ......................................... 33 </p><p>Museum Briefs ........................................ 37 Book Reviews ........................................ 38 School Directory ....................................... 48 Advertiser's Index ..................................... 48 </p><p>NEWS: News of the Profession .................................. 39 Regional News ........................................ 42 Student News ......................................... 47 </p><p>COVER: Two works by Ad Reinhardt. Left, "K," 1960, Diptych. Oil on canvas. Dwan Gallery, Los Angeles, California. Right, "No. 12," 1962. Oil. San Francisco Museum of Art, Collection Mrs. Morris Stulsaft. </p><p>This content downloaded from 91.229.248.162 on Tue, 10 Jun 2014 07:46:12 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p>Article Contents[unnumbered][unnumbered]p.[1]</p><p>Issue Table of ContentsArt Education, Vol. 18, No. 9, Continuing Art Education for Adults (Dec., 1965), pp. 1-48Front Matter [pp.1-1]Guest Editor: Marylou Kuhn [p.2][Introduction] [p.3]The Naturalization of American Art: Cause and Effect of a Current Phenomenon [pp.4-7]"Michelangelo: The Last Giant" [pp.8-11]Symposium: The Locales of Adult Art Education[Introduction] [pp.12-14]Locale 1: Urban Co-Sponsors: The University Center for Adult Education and the Detroit Institute of Arts [p.15]Locale 2: Museums the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Walker Art Center and the Milwaukee Art Center [pp.15-17]Locale 3: Public Schools Mott Adult Education Program, Flint, Michigan [pp.17-18]Locale 4: Community Art Centers the LeMoyne Art Foundation [p.18]Locale 5: Activity Day Centers A. Hospitality House in Dallas, Texas [pp.18-21]Locale 6: Military Community Centers [p.21]Locale 7: Higher Education A. Its Involvement in Adult Art Education [pp.21-23]Locale 8: Arts Councils [pp.23-24]</p><p>Emerging Directions in Adult Art Education [pp.25-32]Reinhardt: The Positive Power of Negational Thinking [pp.33-35]Museum Briefs [p.37]Book Reviewsuntitled [p.38]untitled [pp.38-39]</p><p>Book Listings [p.39]News of the Profession [pp.39-46]Regional News [pp.42-45]Student News [p.47]Back Matter [pp.36-48]</p></li></ul>