Constellation in the Month of july

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1. Good Morning Reporters: Jomar Genebraldo Ariel Gayomali 2. B Constellations in the Month of March 3. March Cancer Canis Minor Carina Lynx Puppis Pyxis Vela Volans 4. Cancer constellation is located in the northern sky. Its name means the crab in Latin. Cancer is the faintest of the 12 zodiac constellations. Its symbol is . Like other constellations of the zodiac, Cancer was catalogued by the Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century. Cancer contains a number of famous deep sky objects, among them the open cluster Praesepe also known as the Beehive Cluster (Messier 44), and the open cluster Messier 67. Cancer 5. Canis Minor is a constellation in the northern sky. Its name means the smaller dog or lesser dog in Latin. The constellation represents one of the dogs following Orion, the hunter in Greek mythology. The other dog is represented by the larger constellation Canis Major. Canis Minor was first catalogued by the Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century. It contains Procyon, one of the brightest stars in the night sky. Canis minor 6. Carina contains Canopus, a white-hued supergiant that is the second brightest star in the night sky at magnitude 0.72, 313 light- years from Earth. Alpha Carinae, as Canopus is formally designated, is a variable star that varies by approximately 0.1 magnitudes. Its traditional name comes from the mythologicalCanopus, who was a navigator for Menelaus, king of Sparta. Carina 7. Lynx Lynx is a very faint constellation in the northern hemisphere. It was first charted by the Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century. He created the constellation from the stars lying in the gap between Ursa Major andAuriga and named it after the lynx because it was so faint that it took someone with the eyesight of a lynx to spot it in the sky. It is uncertain whether or not he was also referring to Lynceus, a figure in Greek mythology who had the best eyesight in the world and was said to have been able to see things underground. 8. Puppis Puppis is a constellation in the southern hemisphere. It was introduced by the French astronomer Nicolas Louis de Lacaille in the 18th century. In Latin, Puppis means "the stern." Puppis was originally part of the much larger constellation Argo Navis, which represented the ship on which Jason and the Argonauts sailed home after stealing the Golden Fleece. 9. Pyxis, or the Mariner's Compass, is a small, inconspicuous constellation in the southern hemisphere. It was first listed in the 18th century by the French astronomer Nicolas Louis de Lacaille, who named it Pyxis Nautica. The name was later shortened to Pyxis, the compass box. There are no myths associated with the constellation. Pyxis 10. Vela is a constellation in the southern hemisphere. Its name is Latin for "sails." The stars of Vela used to be part of a larger constellation, Argo Navis, named after the ship on which the Argonauts sailed home after their expedition for the Golden Fleece. Argo Navis was split by the International Astronomical Union into three separate constellations,Carina (the keel), Puppis (the stern) and Vela (the sails). The stars' designations were not changed, which is why Vela does not have any stars designated alpha or beta Velorum. Vela 11. Volans is a constellation in the southern hemisphere. It was first introduced by the Dutch astronomer Petrus Plancius in the 16th century from the observations of the Dutch explorers Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman. Volans is one of the constellations that appeared in German cartographer Johann Bayer's celestial atlasUranometria in 1603. Bayer called the constellation Piscis Volans ("the flying fish"). Volans 12. Thank You