Computational Pharmacokinetics

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<p>Biostatistics Series</p> <p>Computational Pharmacokinetics</p> <p>Biostatistics SeriesEditor-in-Chief Shein-Chung Chow, Ph.D. Professor Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Duke University School of Medicine Durham, North Carolina, U.S.A.</p> <p>Series EditorsByron Jones Senior Director Statistical Research and Consulting Centre (IPC 193) Pfizer Global Research and Development Sandwich, Kent, UK Jen-pei Liu Professor Division of Biometry Department of Agronomy National Taiwan University Taipei, Taiwan</p> <p>Karl E. Peace Director, Karl E. Peace Center for Biostatistics Professor of Biostatistics Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Cancer Scholar Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA</p> <p>Biostatistics SeriesPublished Titles1. Design and Analysis of Animal Studies in Pharmaceutical Development, Shein-Chung Chow and Jen-pei Liu 2. Basic Statistics and Pharmaceutical Statistical Applications, James E. De Muth 3. Design and Analysis of Bioavailability and Bioequivalence Studies, Second Edition, Revised and Expanded, Shein-Chung Chow and Jen-pei Liu 4. Meta-Analysis in Medicine and Health Policy, Dalene K. Stangl and Donald A. Berry 5. Generalized Linear Models: A Bayesian Perspective, Dipak K. Dey, Sujit K. Ghosh, and Bani K. Mallick 6. Difference Equations with Public Health Applications, Lemuel A. Moy and Asha Seth Kapadia 7. Medical Biostatistics, Abhaya Indrayan and Sanjeev B. Sarmukaddam 8. Statistical Methods for Clinical Trials, Mark X. Norleans 9. Causal Analysis in Biomedicine and Epidemiology: Based on Minimal Sufficient Causation, Mikel Aickin 10. Statistics in Drug Research: Methodologies and Recent Developments, Shein-Chung Chow and Jun Shao 11. Sample Size Calculations in Clinical Research, Shein-Chung Chow, Jun Shao, and Hansheng Wang 12. Applied Statistical Design for the Researcher, Daryl S. Paulson 13. Advances in Clinical Trial Biostatistics, Nancy L. Geller 14. Statistics in the Pharmaceutical Industry, Third Edition, Ralph Buncher and Jia-Yeong Tsay 15. DNA Microarrays and Related Genomics Techniques: Design, Analysis, and Interpretation of Experiments, David B. Allsion, Grier P. Page, T. Mark Beasley, and Jode W. Edwards 16. Basic Statistics and Pharmaceutical Statistical Applications, Second Edition, James E. De Muth 17. Adaptive Design Methods in Clinical Trials, Shein-Chung Chow and Mark Chang 18. Handbook of Regression and Modeling: Applications for the Clinical and Pharmaceutical Industries, Daryl S. Paulson 19. Statistical Design and Analysis of Stability Studies, Shein-Chung Chow 20. Sample Size Calculations in Clinical Research, Second Edition, Shein-Chung Chow, Jun Shao, and Hansheng Wang 21. Elementary Bayesian Biostatistics, Lemuel A. Moy 22. Adaptive Design Theory and Implementation Using SAS and R, Mark Chang 23. Computational Pharmacokinetics, Anders Klln</p> <p>Biostatistics Series</p> <p>Computational Pharmacokinetics</p> <p>Anders KllnAstraZeneca R&amp;D Lund, Sweden</p> <p>Boca Raton London New York</p> <p>Chapman &amp; Hall/CRC is an imprint of the Taylor &amp; Francis Group, an informa business</p> <p>Chapman &amp; Hall/CRC Taylor &amp; Francis Group 6000 Broken Sound Parkway NW, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 334872742 2008 by Taylor &amp; Francis Group, LLC Chapman &amp; Hall/CRC is an imprint of Taylor &amp; Francis Group, an Informa business No claim to original U.S. Government works Printed in the United States of America on acidfree paper 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 International Standard Book Number13: 9781420060652 (Hardcover) This book contains information obtained from authentic and highly regarded sources. Reprinted material is quoted with permission, and sources are indicated. A wide variety of references are listed. Reasonable efforts have been made to publish reliable data and information, but the author and the publisher cannot assume responsibility for the validity of all materials or for the conse quences of their use. No part of this book may be reprinted, reproduced, transmitted, or utilized in any form by any electronic, mechanical, or other means, now known or hereafter invented, including photocopying, microfilming, and recording, or in any information storage or retrieval system, without written permission from the publishers. For permission to photocopy or use material electronically from this work, please access www. copyright.com (http://www.copyright.com/) or contact the Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. (CCC) 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, 9787508400. CCC is a notforprofit organization that provides licenses and registration for a variety of users. For organizations that have been granted a photocopy license by the CCC, a separate system of payment has been arranged. Trademark Notice: Product or corporate names may be trademarks or registered trademarks, and are used only for identification and explanation without intent to infringe. Library of Congress CataloginginPublication Data Klln, Anders. Computational pharmacokinetics / Anders Klln. p. ; cm. (Chapman &amp; Hall/CRC biostatistics series ; 23) Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN13: 9781420060652 (hardcover : alk. paper) ISBN10: 1420060651 (hardcover : alk. paper) 1. PharmacokineticsData processing. I. Title. II. Series. [DNLM: 1. PharmacokineticsMathematical models. 2. Empirical Research. 3. Models, Theoretical. QV 38 K137c 2007] RM301.5.K35 2007 615.70285dc22 Visit the Taylor &amp; Francis Web site at http://www.taylorandfrancis.com and the CRC Press Web site at http://www.crcpress.com 2007013826</p> <p>Anders Klln a e</p> <p>Computational Pharmacokinetics</p> <p>CRC PRESS Boca Raton London</p> <p>New York</p> <p>Washington, D.C.</p> <p>Series IntroductionThe primary objectives of the Chapman &amp; Hall/CRC Biostatistics Series are to provide useful reference books for researchers and scientists in academia, industry, and government, and also to oer textbooks for undergraduate and/or graduate courses in the area of biostatistics. This book series will provide comprehensive and unied presentations of statistical designs and analyses of important applications in biostatistics, such as those in biopharmaceuticals. A well-balanced summary will be given of current and recently developed statistical methods and interpretations for both statisticians and researchers/scientists with minimal statistical knowledge, who are engaged in the eld of applied biostatistics. The series is committed to providing easy-to-understand, state-of-the-art references and textbooks. In each book, statistical concepts and methodologies will be illustrated through real-world examples. For a given drug product, it is of interest to study how the drug moves through the body and the processes of movement such as absorption (A), distribution (D), metabolism (M), and excretion (E) after drug administration. The key concept of a pharmacokinetic (PK) study is to study what the body does to the drug (which is usually characterized by ADME of a drug product after administration), while the key concept of a pharmacodynamic (PD) study is to study what the drug does to the body. This leads to the study of PK or population PK. The goal of a PK/PD study is to study the relationship between dose and response, which provides insightful information regarding: (i) how best to choose doses at which to evaluate a drug, (ii) how best to use a drug in a population, and (iii) how best to use a drug to treat individual patients or subpopulations of patients. Unlike most researchers in the area, the author focuses on mathematical models for PK parameters rather than the population PK, which is the application of nonlinear mixed eects modelling to PK models. This book in the series, Computational Pharmacokinetics, provides useful (mathematical model) approaches for PK studies in pharmaceutical research and development. It covers empirical PK, numerical methods for PK parameter estimation, physiological aspects of PK, modelling the distribution process, and PK/PD modelling. It would be benecial to pharmaceutical scientists/researchers and biostatisticians who are engaged in the areas of pharmaceutical research and development. Shein-Chung Chow Editor-in-Chief Chapman &amp; Hall/CRC Biostatistics Series</p> <p>vii</p> <p>Preface</p> <p>The study of how the body handles various substances, in particular drugs we take, is called pharmacokinetics and started out as an application of linear dierential equations. However, as the subject grew in clinical importance, this proved a barrier to learning it and the subject was therefore reformulated in more physiological terms, with the little mathematics that remained considered a nuisance. Today pharmacokinetics plays an important role in the early development of new drugs. This author started out studying mathematics and encountered pharmacokinetics when joining the pharmaceutical industry. Since then he has nurtured a dream to get the opportunity to show, in particular to statisticians, with a mathematical background, what the subject is about mathematical modelling. In the summer of 2006 there was an opening, and this book is the result. It is important to note that this is a book about pharmacokinetics for statisticians, not a book about statistical aspects of pharmacokinetics. It is not a book about methods for model tting, nonlinear regression or mixed effects models, neither is it a book about statistical models for pharmacokinetic parameters. In particular, there is almost no discussion on the subject of population kinetics, since this is the application of nonlinear mixed eects modelling to pharmacokinetic models. There are a number of apologies that seems appropriate to do at this stage: 1. There is a very short reference list to this book. I spend far too little time reading scientic articles, and (therefore?) nd it better to omit giving credit to people than to give credit to the wrong people. With this approach there is also no risk of claiming originality of any part of the present work by mistake, since none is claimed. 2. This book has been written from the perspective of pharmacokinetics as an area in applied mathematics. This viewpoint may not go down well with many contemporary workers in the eld. I hope, however, that the way it has been developed, building on the accepted concepts of the pharmacokinetics of today, can lead to forgiveness at least by some. Given these apologies, a few words on what has inspired this book might not be amiss. The rst inspiration is a delightful book by D.S. Riggs [5] on the mathematical treatise of physiological phenomena. My rst non-trivial contact with real-life pharmacokinetics was in a course given by Apotekarsocieten in Sweden in 1988. Among other things, that course directed me to</p> <p>ix</p> <p>x what may be the standard treatise of clinical pharmacokinetics [6], a book deliberately written using very little mathematics. This, of course, is the reason for the success it has had. The nal piece of inspiration for me was the one-week workshop which professors Malcolm Rowland and Lewis Sheiner with co-workers have had for many years in Advanced Methods in Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics, and which I attended in 1993. Any overlap between the content of that workshop and the content of this book is denitely not a coincidence. There is only one real-life example in this book. It is however used extensively and the author wants to thank his employer, AstraZeneca, for allowing the usage of these data without any constraints. I want to thank a few people for helping me by reviewing and making comments at dierent stages of the development of this book. Thanks are due to Tore Persson and Eva Bredberg, colleagues at AstraZeneca, to Professor Michael C. Makoid and to my father, Professor Bengt Klln. a e A Finally, this book was written in L TEX, and the software used for computations and graphics was the high level matrix programming language GAUSS, distributed by Aptech Systems of Maple Valley, Washington. Most of the code is part of a bigger library of statistical and other GAUSS procedures. Anders Klln a e Lund, March 2007</p> <p>Contents</p> <p>1 Introduction 1.1 Goal with this book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2 A short course in pharmacokinetics . . . . . 1.3 Overview of book disposition . . . . . . . . . 1.4 Integrals and convolution . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5 Linear kinetics and compartments . . . . . . 1.6 Markov processes and compartmental models</p> <p>. . . . . .</p> <p>. . . . . .</p> <p>. . . . . .</p> <p>. . . . . .</p> <p>. . . . . .</p> <p>. . . . . .</p> <p>. . . . . .</p> <p>. . . . . .</p> <p>. . . . . .</p> <p>1 1 2 5 7 9 10 13 13 14 14 15 17 18 19 22 22 23 25 29 33 38 41 41 42 44 47 48 50 50 50 51 53 57 59</p> <p>2 Empirical pharmacokinetics 2.1 Problem specication and some notations . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Distribution and elimination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.1 Linear kinetics and bolus dose . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.2 Clearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.3 Mean residence time and half-life . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.4 Volumes of distributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2.5 Illustration of non-compartmental PK analysis . . 2.3 Absorption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.1 A convolution equation and its consequences . . . 2.3.2 Intravascular infusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.3 Extravascular drug administration . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Multiple dosing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 One compartment drugs with capacity limited elimination 2.6 Chapter epilogue: A recirculation model . . . . . . . . . 3 Numerical methods for PK parameter estimation 3.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2 Estimating the terminal elimination rate . . . . . . . . . 3.3 Integral estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.4 Numerical deconvolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.5 Population average vs. subject-specic approach . . . . . 3.6 A real example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.6.1 Description of data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.6.2 Determination of terminal elimination half-life . . 3.6.3 Description of distribution and elimination . . . . 3.6.4 Absorption proles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.6.5 Accumulation at multiple dosing . . . . . . . . . . 3.7 Chapter epilogue: Pharmacokinetics in drug development</p> <p>. . . . . . . . . . . .</p> <p>. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .</p> <p>. . . . . . . . . . . .</p> <p>. . . . . . . . . . . .</p> <p>xi</p> <p>xii 4 Physiological aspects on pharmacokinetics 4.1 Some physiological preliminaries . . . . . . . 4.2 Distribution volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2.1 Protein binding . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2.2 Volume decomposition . . . . . . . . . 4.3 Events within an organ . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3.1 Ficks principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3.2 The organ transfer function . . . . . . 4.3.3 A well-stirred non-eliminating organ . 4.3.4 A well-stirred eliminating organ . . . . 4.3.5 Heterogenous organs . . . . . . . . . . 4.4 Building a physiological PK model . . . . . . 4.4.1 A recirculation model . . . . . ....</p>