Composing Information Space: Shaun Slattery

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Composing Information Space: Writers Need forInformation Management Techniques by Shaun Slattery, Ph.D. University of South Florida Polytechnic Presented at Computers & Writing @ Purdue, May 22, 2010

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<ul><li> 1. Composing Information Space: Writers Need forInformation Management Techniques<br />Shaun Slattery<br />University of South Florida Polytechnic<br />Computers &amp; Writing @ Purdue<br />Friday, May 22, 2010<br /></li> <li> 2. </li> <li> 3. You should process information every time you collect it.<br />Merlin Mann, 43 Folders, on Inbox 0<br /></li> <li> 4. Personal Information Management (PIM)<br /></li> <li> 5. </li> <li> 6. </li> <li> 7. </li> <li> 8. </li> <li> 9. </li> <li> 10. </li> <li> 11. </li> <li> 12. </li> <li> 13. rhetorical invention<br />composing processes<br />communication<br />PIMplications<br /></li> <li> 14. </li> <li> 15. more research into the ways writers work to integrate new tools into their writing processes (acting with these technologies rather than simply acting on them or being acted upon by them)<br />Derek Van Ittersum. Distributing Memory: Rhetorical Work in Digital Environments TCQ, 18.3, 2009 (p.277)<br /></li> <li> 16. </li> <li> 17. Abrams, Baecker, &amp; Chignell. (1998.) Information archiving with bookmarks: personal Web space construction and organization, SIGCHI Proceedings, p.41-48.<br /></li> <li> 18. Abrams, Baecker, &amp; Chignell. (1998.) Information archiving with bookmarks: personal Web space construction and organization, SIGCHI Proceedings, p.41-48.<br /></li> <li> 19. </li> <li> 20. A problem in evaluating PIM tools or systems is that personal information is, by definition, personal. Thus, it is difficult, or close to impossible, to develop reference tasks that can be performed by multiple users to test multiple tools and approaches<br />ManasTungare. "Mental Workload in Personal Information Management." Unpublished dissertation. 2009. (p.3)<br /></li> <li> 21. Identify a range of practices from published research, our own research, &amp; informally observed practice<br />Hack our PIM practices &amp; develop a repertoire and encourage students to do likewise<br />Model our PIM practices for students<br /></li> <li> 22. PIM is idiosyncratic<br /></li> <li> 23. People are slow to adopt new PIM strategies and resistant to changing them<br /></li> <li> 24. Few writers seem willing to wholly adopt and commit to new means of memory work that require drastic changes in their existing practices<br />Derek Van Ittersum. Distributing Memory: Rhetorical Work in Digital Environments TCQ, 18.3, 2009 (p.277)<br /></li> <li> 25. We found that participants were reluctant to engage with a complex range of information sources, preferring to use the Internet. The main driver for progress in information seeking was the immediate demands of their work (e.g., assignments). Students used their growing expertise to justify a conservative information strategy, retaining established strategies as far as possible and completing tasks with minimum information-seeking effort<br />Claire Warwick, Jon Rimmer, Ann Blandford, Jeremy Gow, George Buchanan. "Cognitive economy and satisficing in information seeking: A longitudinal study of undergraduate information behavior." Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 60.12. 2009. p. 2402<br /></li> <li> 26. <ul><li>PIM behaviors seem to have changed little over time, suggesting that technological advances are less important in determining how individuals organize and use information than are the tasks that they perform</li></ul>Deborah Barreau, The persistence of behavior and form in the organization of personal information, Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, v.59 n.2, p.307-317, January 2008<br /></li> <li> 27. notes work<br /></li> <li> 28. <ul><li>notes help memory in two ways. First, they provide cues that help people retrieve information that they might otherwise forget. Second, the act of taking notes helps people to better focus on incoming information even if they never later consult these notes.</li></ul>VaivaKalnikait &amp; Steve Whittaker. Cueing digital memory: how and why do digital notes help us remember? Proceedings of the 22nd British HCI Group Annual Conference on HCI 2008. (p. 153)<br /></li> <li> 29. To Dos work<br /></li> <li> 30. contrary to popular wisdom, people are not poor at prioritizing. Rather, they have well-honed strategies for tackling particular task management challenges<br />VaivaKalnikait &amp; Steve Whittaker. Cueing digital memory: how and why do digital notes help us remember? Proceedings of the 22nd British HCI Group Annual Conference on HCI 2008. (p. 153)<br /></li> <li> 31. physical/spatial and temporal cues work<br /></li> <li> 32. Two physical factorsspatial configuration and document formwere often considered before topic in determining document storage locations in the office<br />Case, Donald O. (1991). Conceptual organization and retrieval of text by historians: the role of memory and metaphor. Journal of the American Society for Information Science. v42 i9. 657-668.<br /></li> <li> 33. metadata works<br /></li> <li> 34. extra terms distinct from the main content [of notes] most frequently added to the beginning or the end we find many searches that were identical to these appended terms<br />Max Van Kleek, Michael Bernstein, Katrina Panovich, Greg Vargas, David Karger, and M.C. Schraefel. "Note-to-Self: Examining Personal Information Keeping in a Lightweight Note-Taking Tool." CHI, 2009. (p.3) <br /></li> <li> 35. PIM is social<br /></li> <li> 36. </li> <li> 37. PIM is social<br /></li> <li> 38. researchers in the five universities had similar information-seeking behavior, with small differences because of varying academic unit structures and myriad libary services provided at the individual institutions<br />Niu, Xi. National study of information seeking behavior of academic researchers in the United States. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 61.5, 2010. (p.869) <br /></li> <li> 39. </li> <li> 40. Identify a range of practices from published research, our own research, &amp; informally observed practice<br />Hack our PIM practices &amp; develop a repertoire and encourage students to do likewise<br />Model our PIM practices for students<br /></li> <li> 41. our own research<br /></li> <li> 42. informally observed practice<br />Image: Taking Notes a Creative Commons licensed photograph from the Flickr stream of user Phil Gyford.<br /></li> <li> 43. Hack our PIM practices<br />Giles Turnbull , OReilly author, hacking his PIM<br /></li> <li> 44. Model our PIM practices for students<br />Distributing Memory Rhetorical Work in Digital Environments BIGGEST.pdf<br />How Do People Organize Their Desks_1983.pdf<br /></li> <li> 45. </li> <li> 46. a collection of flexible, opportunistic practices that lets users construct, out of the tools available to them, useful assemblies of rhetorical tools and practices<br />Derek Van Ittersum. Distributing Memory: Rhetorical Work in Digital Environments TCQ, 18.3, 2009 (p.278)<br /></li> <li> 47. thank you<br /></li> </ul>