comics & the graphic novel. what are comics ? comics definition

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  • Slide 1
  • Comics & The Graphic Novel
  • Slide 2
  • What are comics ?
  • Slide 3
  • Comics definition
  • Slide 4
  • Standard of Ur War4,500 years ago
  • Slide 5
  • Standard of Ur - Peace
  • Slide 6
  • Comics history tomb paintings circa 1300 BCE
  • Slide 7
  • Comics history Egyptian tomb painting Akhenaten & Nefertiti awarding gold necklace to Aye, circa 1330 BCE.
  • Slide 8
  • Comics historyBayeux tapestry (20 inch x 230 feet) 1064. Edward is King of England. He talks to his brother-in-law Harold, who leaves with his companions and hunting dogs. He holds the hawk. He arrives at a church and prays for safe passage and they set sail. Note: sequential art, but there are no panel divisions but rather subject divisions..
  • Slide 9
  • Comics basics American comics are usually read from left to right, top to bottom.
  • Slide 10
  • Comics basics American comics are read from left to right, top to bottom. Pages are often produced using a basic grid.
  • Slide 11
  • Comics basics American comics are usually read from left to right, top to bottom. Pages are often produced using a basic grid. The space between frames is called the gutter.
  • Slide 12
  • Comics basics American comics are usually read from right to left, top to bottom. Pages are often produced using a basic grid. The space between frames if called the gutter. A panel is usually outlined with a frame.
  • Slide 13
  • Comics basics American comics are usually read from right to left, top to bottom. Pages are often produced using a basic grid. The space between frames if called the gutter. Panels are usually outlined with a frame. Dialogue is shown in floating balloons; narration in boxes.
  • Slide 14
  • Principles of the Comics Panel The single image that is usually laid out within borders is known as a panel. These panels would be similar to individual frames of film. Panel frames The border or edges of a panel, when drawn, are called frames. These are normally rectangular in shape, but this shape can be altered to convey information to the reader. Bleed Full bleed is usually used on a comic book cover, and is when the art is allowed to run to the edge of each page, rather than having a white border around it. Splash page Splash page or sometimes referred to simply as a "splash", is a full page drawing in a comic book. A splash page is often used as the first page of a story, and includes the title and credits.
  • Slide 15
  • Principles of the Comics Panel The single image that is usually laid out within borders is known as a panel. These panels would be similar to individual frames of film. Panel frames The border or edges of a panel, when drawn, are called frames. These are normally rectangular in shape, but this shape can be altered to convey information to the reader. Bleed Full bleed is usually used on a comic book cover, and is when the art is allowed to run to the edge of each page, rather than having a white border around it. Splash page Splash page or sometimes referred to simply as a "splash", is a full page drawing in a comic book. A splash page is often used as the first page of a story, and includes the title and credits.
  • Slide 16
  • Principles of the Comics Panel The single image that is usually laid out within borders is known as a panel. These panels would be similar to individual frames of film. Panel frames The border or edges of a panel, when drawn, are called frames. These are normally rectangular in shape, but this shape can be altered to convey information to the reader. Bleed Full bleed is usually used on a comic book cover, and is when the art is allowed to run to the edge of each page, rather than having a white border around it. Splash page Splash page or sometimes referred to simply as a "splash", is a full page drawing in a comic book. A splash page is often used as the first page of a story, and includes the title and credits.
  • Slide 17
  • Principles of the Comics Splash page Splash page or sometimes referred to simply as a "splash", is a full page drawing in a comic book. A splash page is often used as the first page of a story, and includes the title and credits.
  • Slide 18
  • Scott McCloud, the comics philosopher
  • Slide 19
  • The essence of a cartoon: focus From Scott McClouds, Understanding Comics
  • Slide 20
  • Universality From Scott McClouds, Understanding Comics
  • Slide 21
  • Closure From Scott McClouds, Understanding Comics To understand closure, take out two dimes and a quarter.
  • Slide 22
  • Reality Vs. Iconic An icon is any image used to represent a person, place, thing, or idea. Simple drawings and/or iconic cartoons allow us to forget about the messenger and focus on the message. In other words, ideas become clearer and louder when the messenger is easy to understand.
  • Slide 23
  • How pictures become comics? From Scott McClouds, Understanding Comics The action takes place between the pictures. We read between the lines/pictures.
  • Slide 24
  • The Gutter Gutters are the spaces between the panels. To kill a man between frames is to condemn him to a 1000 deaths. -- Scott McCloud
  • Slide 25
  • Transitions: Moment to Moment From Scott McClouds, Understanding Comics
  • Slide 26
  • Transitions: Action to Action From Scott McClouds, Understanding Comics
  • Slide 27
  • Transitions: Subject to Subject From Scott McClouds, Understanding Comics
  • Slide 28
  • Transitions: Scene to Scene From Scott McClouds, Understanding Comics
  • Slide 29
  • Transitions: Aspect to Aspect From Scott McClouds, Understanding Comics
  • Slide 30
  • Transitions: Non-sequitur From Scott McClouds, Understanding Comics
  • Slide 31
  • Film Terms & Principles Establishing shots [often highly detailed] show the reader/viewer where they are.
  • Slide 32
  • Film Terms & Principles Establishing shots [often highly detailed] show the reader/viewer where they are.
  • Slide 33
  • Film Terms & Principles Establishing shots [often highly detailed] show the reader/viewer where they are.
  • Slide 34
  • Differentiating Language Sometimes the artist wants to show differences between characters and how they speak.
  • Slide 35
  • Differentiating Language Sometimes the artist wants to show differences between characters and how they speak.
  • Slide 36
  • Differentiating Language Sometimes the artist wants to show differences between characters and how they speak.
  • Slide 37
  • Differentiating Language Sometimes the artist wants to show differences between characters and how they speak.
  • Slide 38
  • Showing sound Zip lines can indicate movement.
  • Slide 39
  • Film Terms & Principles Shots: XLS, LS, MS, CU, XCU Reverse angle Two successive shots from equal and opposite angles, typically of characters during conversation. Characters are usually kept on the same side of the picture throughout a scene.
  • Slide 40
  • Good comics like films, tell a story visually and create a dialogue between viewer and artist.
  • Slide 41
  • 1950s - Classics Illustrated
  • Slide 42
  • Slide 43
  • The Graphic Novel
  • Slide 44
  • The Graphic Novel definition
  • Slide 45
  • Graphic novel is to novel as comic book is to short story
  • Slide 46
  • The first graphic novel Bloodstar [1976] was the first graphic novel to be advertised as such, although Will Eisners A Contract with God [1978] trade paperback used the term also. But
  • Slide 47
  • The first graphic novel In 1842, the first major graphic novel was published in the United States. The Adventures of Obadiah Oldbuck by humorist Rodolphe Toffer, appeared in a weekly humor magazine called Brother Jonathan. From A Brief History of the Graphic Novel by Stan Tychinski
  • Slide 48
  • Neil Gaimans The Sandman Considered the most popular graphic novel is Neil Gaimans The Sandman.
  • Slide 49
  • The Sandman The series consists of 10 volumes and is drawn by various artists.
  • Slide 50
  • Other popular graphic novels The Books of Magic
  • Slide 51
  • Other popular graphic novels
  • Slide 52
  • Popular graphic novels about animals
  • Slide 53
  • Slide 54
  • Super heroes
  • Slide 55
  • Other popular graphic novels Invincible
  • Slide 56
  • The Classics
  • Slide 57
  • Personal Stories into graphic novel
  • Slide 58
  • The Trojan War
  • Slide 59
  • Historical graphic novels
  • Slide 60
  • Parchment of Light: The Life & Death of William Shakespeare
  • Slide 61
  • Left Behind series graphic novels
  • Slide 62
  • Now its your turn! In your journals, draw a simple cartoon that depicts your morning routine. What are the steps you go through from waking up to showing up at school?