clarinet i - i technique packet clarinet techniques reed clinic fingering chart major scales long...

Download Clarinet I -   I Technique Packet Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 ? Â· 2017-10-20

Post on 03-Feb-2018

238 views

Category:

Documents

9 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Clarinet I Technique Packet

    Clarinet Techniques Reed Clinic

    Fingering Chart Major Scales Long Tones

    Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 Technique No. 3 Technique NO. 4

    Articulation No. 1 Articulation No. 2 Articulation No. 3

    Amazing Grace (Phantom Regiment 1992) Canon (Phantom Regiment 2003)

    Adagio for Strings (Santa Clara Vanguard 2013)

  • Clarinet Techniques

    by Sergeant Major Wendell Voss

    Master Sergeant James HeffernanMaster Sergeant Cathy Ogram

    Sergeant First Class Shari Smith

    The Musical Ambassadors of the ArmyWashington, DCWashington, DCW

    The United StatesArmy Field Band

    The United States Army Field Band4214 Field Band Drive Fort Meade, Maryland 20755-5330

    Phone: (301) 677-6586 Fax: (301) 677-6533E-mail: fl dband@emh1.ftmeade.army.mil Website: www.army.mil/fi eldband

  • The U.S. Army Field Band Clarinet Techniques

    31

    & 4

    4 ..

    .

    .

    .

    .

    .

    .

    .

    .

    Clarinet Techniquesby

    Sergeant Major Wendell VossSergeant First Class James Heffernan

    Sergeant First Class Cathy OgramStaff Sergeant Shari Smith

    the back in the arched, or ee position. Fluctua-tions in the soft under-chin area when removingthe tongue indicate that the entire tongue, notjust the tip, is moving.

    Usually it takes several tries and some en-couragement to move only the tip of the tongue.The next step is to finger an open G and, withthe tongue on the reed, begin to blow. Release thetongue to play the G on signal, then try to stopthe tone with the tongue on signal (see Example2). Although the tone will stop, the air pressureshould remain full. To see if the air pressure isbeing maintained, leak a little air from the cor-ner of the embouchure while blowing. Thoughplaying with an air leak is not recommended, thiswill verify if the air pressure is constant or chokedoff when the tongue returns to the reed.

    Example 2

    Once this can be accomplished moving onlythe tip of the tongue while maintaining air pres-sure, shorten the rhythmic values (see Examples 3and 4).

    Example 3 q = 60

    Most players accomplish this lesson in twentyminutes, although it helps to continue to review har-monic exercises for proper tongue position. Use thephrase breathe-blow-release to encourage blow-ing a full amount of air before the attack. Articula-tion occurs as the tongue moves away from the reed,

    TONE AND ARTICULATIONFor clear staccato playing and tone production,

    clarinet students need to have the proper tongueposition, visualizing the oral cavitys shape whensaying ee or hee. Blowing air through a strawwith the tongue in this position is a good beginningexercise for proper air stream. Studying clarinetharmonics (the sounds produced when overblowinga note) further develops this shape and tongue po-sition. The following exercise will help achieve this.

    First, hold an open G at a comfortable volume;then overblow the G, producing a D6. Reach D6 byarching the tongue slightly higher in the back ofthe mouth while keeping the throat open and re-laxed. Sometimes it helps to play D6 with the properfingering for four counts to hear the pitch. Afterhearing the pitch and feeling the proper tongueposition, once again overblow G to play D6 andoverblow D6 to play Bb6. Then descend chromati-cally from G to E3, one tone after the next, holdingthe fundamental and the two overblown harmon-ics for four counts each (see Example 1). Studentsshould have a good feel for the proper oral cavityshape after learning the pitches in this exercise;they can only be played if the air stream is full andthe oral cavity is shaped correctly.

    Example 1

    Begin staccato studies by placing the tip of thetongue on the reed tip, maintaining proper posi-tion and shape of the oral cavityespecially atthe back of the tongue. Finger an open G. Whilethe tongue depresses the tip of the reed againstthe mouthpiece, blow the air and remove thetongue on signal. Prior to removing the tongue,the student will be blowing, but no sound shouldcome from the clarinet since the tongue is on thereed. Remove only the tip of the tongue, keeping

    &

    w

    w

    w#

    #

    w

    w

    w

    b

    n

    n

    w

    w

    w

    w

    w

    w

    & 4

    4 ..

    j

    .

    j

    .

    & 4

    4 ..

    j

    .

    j

    .

    j

    .

    j

    .

    Air

    Air

    Air

    Continuedown to:

    Example 4 q = 60

  • 32

    Clarinet Techniques

    & 4

    3

    .

    .

    &b c

    3

    .

    3

    .

    3

    .

    3

    .

    not as it moves toward the reed. Release the tip ofthe tongue from the reed with the syllable tee.

    Beginning with Example 5 from the Rose 32Studies, breathe, blow, and release the first A, play-ing the note as short as possible at a comfortablevolume. With the tongue on the reed, change to thefollowing C# on signal. Release the C# and play thegrace notes, quickly stopping the tone with thetongue after the second C#. Move to the E, releaseit, and play it as short as possible. Complete theexercise at a comfortable tempo, then play the en-tire etude at e = 44, quickly moving the fingers tothe next note. There should be no tongue sounds,grunts, or subtones as notes are released.

    Example 5 q = 60

    Keep the air pressure steady when the tongueis on the reed, moving only the tip of the tongue.Keep the back of the tongue arched and stable, fin-gering notes just ahead of the tongue. Play eachstaccato note with perfect clarity. This is achievedonly when the tongue, air speed, and tongue pres-sure are correct.

    Example 6 from the Rose 40 Studies combinesslurred and staccato notes. Practice by releasingthe D, maintaining the air pressure and moving thefingers ahead to the A. Then release it and slur downto the F; clip the F short and move the fingers im-mediately ahead to the D during the silence betweenthe notes. All of the notes preceding the staccatonotes should be clipped so the fingers move aheadto the next notes.

    Example 6

    If some upper articulations do not sound im-mediately, review the harmonic study based on thefundamental of the note causing the problem. Forexample, if B5 does not sound, review the harmonicfor E4 (E4, B5, G6) and try the measure again.

    Begin practicing Example 6 by playing each trip-let eighth-note at 60 beats per minute, gradually in-creasing to 92. Speed is not as important as properlyvoicing each note and using a steady air stream. Byusing correct tonguing, players will learn to articu-late as fast as the tempo requires with a good tone.

    Proceed to Example 7 from the 40 Studies,playing slowly to carefully evaluate the releases.Playing the thirty-second-note as short as possibleand immediately going to the next sixteenth helpsthe tongue stay close to the reed and move only ashort distance. A good starting tempo is e=46.

    Example 7

    Example 8 uses groupings of two notes slurred,one after the other.

    Example 8

    Very slowly

    Clip slurs only if they are followed by a stac-cato note. When groups of notes are slurred one af-ter the other, the articulated first note should betongued tee, without holding the reed down tocreate space. Play Rose etudes 10, 11, 16, 17, 19,and 20 in the same way, beginning each one slowlyand gradually increasing the tempo.

    This approach to staccato playing uses thestudy of harmonics to place the tongue correctly andimprove tone. Practicing slowly and producing beau-tiful staccato notes will help to develop an all-around tone, but the trick is to keep air pressurefull and constant, moving only the tip of the tongueto the tip of the reed. Remember, it is the back ofthe tongue that keeps the tone voiced properly.

    CLARINET TECHNIQUEThe development of good technique is one of

    the most important issues in learning to play theclarinet. Many students, both young and not so

    &

    #

    #

    #

    c .

    .

    .

    .

    .

    .

    .

    .

    Solid line indicates fingers moving ahead

    T T T T T T T T T T

    &

    #

    #

  • The U.S. Army Field Band Clarinet Techniques

    33

    &c ..

    .

    ...

    .

    ...

    &

    .

    ...

    .

    ...

    3

    3

    3

    3

    young, take the approach of learning to play fastnotes without taking the time to slowly develop goodhabits. This almost always results in the cultivationof bad habits that eventually hinder the student.

    The three most important goals in the pursuit oftechnical improvement are correct hand position, cor-rect finger motion, and relaxation. Gradual technicalimprovement should take place when the student takestime each day to practice these aspects. Effort shouldbe made to always practice in front of a mirror, con-stantly checking for mistakes. And, of course, it is bet-ter to practice too slowly than to practice too fast.

    CORRECT HAND POSITIONThe hands should be in a natural position

    when placed on the clarinet. To accomplish this,start by letting the hands dangle naturally at theside. Gradually bring them up as if to play the clari-net. The hands should be relaxed and slightlycupped, with the thumbnails facing upward. Thearms are fairly close to the body and the wristsshould break inward slightly (toward the back ofthe clarinet). It is important to note that if tensionor discomfort results, the wrist angle is probablyexaggerated. If an imaginary line were drawnthrough the back of the clarinet (left to right), itwould run through the knuckles.

    The right thumb should be at an angle, approxi-mately 3545 from the imaginary line. There aremany commercial thumb rests available to help wit

Recommended

View more >