city guide to sacred spaces – new orleans, la

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  • City Guide to Sacred Spaces New Orleans, LA

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    Sacred Space International / Tour Sacred Spaces

  • CIT Y GUIDE TO SACRED SPACES

    NEW ORLEANS, LA

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    LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN

    LAKE BORGNE

    MISSISSIPPI

    RIVER

    Key Map

    Sacred New Orleans: Introduction to finding sacred spaces in New Orleans

    Individual Sacred Space Descriptions:

    Map A

    [NOLA 01] Cathedral-Basilica of St. Louis King of France

    [NOLA 02] Voodoo Spiritual Temple

    [NOLA 03] The Church of the Immaculate Conception

    [NOLA 04] New Orleans Zen Temple

    Map B

    [NOLA 05] St. Charles Avenue Streetcar

    [NOLA 06] Christ Church Cathedral

    [NOLA 07] Lafayette Cemetery No. 1

    [NOLA 08] Rayne Memorial United Methodist Church

    [NOLA 09] Touro Synagogue

    [NOLA 10] Temple Sinai

    [NOLA 11] St. Charles Avenue Baptist Church

    Map C

    [NOLA 12] Hellenic Orthodox Church of the Holy Trinity

    Bibliography and Acknowledgments

    Credits

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    Table of Contents

  • CIT Y GUIDE TO SACRED SPACES

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    SacredNew Orleans

    Flying in over Lake Pontchartrain for the first time, I

    thought it was a sea. From the air, and on our maps, the

    landscape surrounding the city seems to dissolve. Land

    blends with water appearing as a tentative, almost

    untenable habitation. Hardscape roadway surfaces

    seem inconspicuous within the sponge-like swamps

    and bayous.

    The city of New Orleans is in a cycle of renewal.

    During our time there we saw spaces full of grandeur

    and decrepitude. Mansions and slums sit next door to

    one another and infrastructures seem fragile. The city

    is at once struggling and letting go of its hold on the

    environment. Five years after Hurricane Katrina, there is

    still a feeling of vulnerability and grief. We felt that the

    people we met were engaged stewards of their sacred

    places in this historic city.

    During our visit to the Voodoo Spiritual Temple,

    Priestess Miriam said to me, that like her I too was a

    Floater. We had come to America from faraway lands,

    me from Ireland and she, via her ancestors in Africa. We

    found commonality - what better city for a Floater to find

    a home, than one who is awash in the waters of a great

    Delta? The Voodoo Religion is strong in New Orleans

    simply because like the city, there is something for

    everyone all mixed together like sacred gumbo. No

    matter what your background, we hope that you find

    solace and peace in the spaces we suggest in our Guide.

    Many of the spaces are linked together by one

    of the main arteries defining the Crescent City: St.

    Charles Avenue. Winding from the Central Business

    District and Canal Street through the Garden District,

    and Uptown, the avenue is lined with a stately parade

    of sacred spaces. They are connected via our secular

    selection The St. Charles Avenue Streetcar. With the

    spaces threaded together by the stops on this line, you

    can use this mobile sacred space as a method to travel.

    Relax, enjoy and watch out for your stop. This will be the

    tour of a lifetime.

    Deirdre Colgan

    Executive Director, Sacred Space International

    Chicago, 2010

    INTRODUCTION TO FINDING SACRED SPACES IN THE CITY

    Soft, spongy moss grows between worn paving bricks in the French Quarter, epitomizing the fragile balance in the city.

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    Tulane University Hospital and Clinic

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    Orleans Ave

    McShane PlSt Claude Ave

    Elysian Fields Ave

    Earhart Blvd

    Louisiana Superdome

    Louis Armstrong

    Park

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    Mississippi River

    Ponchartrain Expy

    [NOLA 01] Cathedral-Basilica of St. Louis King of France[NOLA 02] Voodoo Spiritual Temple[NOLA 03] The Church of the Immaculate Conception[NOLA 04] New Orleans Zen Temple

    MORE TO SEE IN THIS AREA

    SACRED SITES SELECTED

    A. Marie Laveaus House of VoodooB. Old Ursuline Convent C. St. Louis Cemetery No.1D. St. Joseph ChurchE. Masjid Ur-Rahim

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    CIT Y GUIDE TO SACRED SPACES

    NEW ORLEANS, LA

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    Map A

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    LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN

    LAKE BORGNE

    MISSISSIPPI

    RIVER

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    Louis Armstrong

    Park

    Mississippi River

    One day I took a hammer and broke through the wall and found the windows. Theyre just too beautiful to not be seen.

    REV. MSGR. CROSY KERN, RECTOR

    CIT Y GUIDE TO SACRED SPACES

    NEW ORLEANS, LA

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    CATHEDRAL-BASILICA OF ST. LOUIS KING OF FRANCE

    VISITOR INFORMATIONCathedral-Basilica of St. Louis King of France

    [NOLA 01] ROMAN CATHOLIC

    Interior view, looking towards the altar.

    01.1

    ADDRESS 615 Pre Antoine Alley, New Orleans, LA 70116-3291NEIGHBORHOOD

    PARKING

    French Quarter

    Parking Lot in front of Jackson SquareCOORDINATES

    NEAREST TRANSIT

    29.957943, -90.063613

    Riverfront Streetcar Line Exit at Toulouse

    PHONE (504) 525-9585 Tours: (504) 525-9583

    OPEN HOURS

    SERVICE HOURS

    TIPS & SUGGESTIONS FOR VISITORS

    Daily 8:30 a.m. 4:00 p.m.

    Monday Friday 7:30 a.m.Saturday 7:30 a.m., 4:00 p.m., 4:45 p.m.,

    5:00 p.m. VigilSunday 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m.

    For a self-guided tour, take a brochure at the church entrance. Visitors can get an impromptu tour from volunteer docents when available. Guided tours for groups are only available with prior reservations, call (504) 525-9583. The tour request form can be found on the Cathedrals website.

    WEBSITE www.stlouiscathedral.org

  • CIT Y GUIDE TO SACRED SPACES

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    ABOUT: HISTORY & ORIGINS

    A recent archaeological study found remnants of

    European style buildings dating back before the founding

    of the city of New Orleans in 1718 by Jean Baptiste Le

    Moyne de Bienville, a French Canadian. He came to this

    spot probably because it had long been a trading post for

    the French, so they already knew the area. Bienville laid

    out the plan of the city which was mostly wilderness at

    the time. There has been a place of worship here since

    1718. By 1720, with more colonists arriving, the St. Louis

    parish was established, dedicated to Saint Louis (Louis

    IX), in honor of Louis XV, the king of France at the time.

    The first parish church was completed around 1730, but

    was destroyed in the Great Fire in 1788, after which the

    first cathedral was built. The Church was consecrated

    as a cathedral in 1793 when the Diocese of Louisiana

    and the Florida was established. The French were here

    until the French and Indian War when Louis XV gave

    the colony to his cousin King Charles III of Spain. The

    Spanish clergy took over and the French began to leave.

    The Cathedral-Basilica of St. Louis King of France is

    the oldest active Catholic cathedral in the United States

    and seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New

    Orleans. In 1845, the buildings began to fall, due to New

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