Chapter 22: Romantic Music: Piano Music

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Chapter 22: Romantic Music: Piano Music. The Piano. Improved by the new technologies of the Industrial Revolution Range extended to 88 keys Home music making Virtuosi pianists. Robert Schumann: Carnaval (1834). Collection of 21 short piano pieces written while a student in Leipzig - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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<ul><li><p>Chapter 22:Romantic Music: Piano Music</p></li><li><p>The PianoImproved by the new technologies of the Industrial Revolution Range extended to 88 keysHome music makingVirtuosi pianists</p></li><li><p>Robert Schumann: Carnaval (1834) Collection of 21 short piano pieces written while a student in LeipzigCarnivalesque goings-on: Musically depicted colorful character, including mardi gras characters, Clara, Chopin, and PaganiniSigns of bipolar disorder already evident hereEusebius is meek and sensitive while Florestan is assertive, even fieryStarted the high-end music magazine Die neue Zeitschrift fr MusikWrote both as Eusebius and Florestan</p></li><li><p>Frdric Chopin (1810-1849)The Poet of the PianoBorn in Warsaw, PolandMade his career in ParisUse of Tempo Rubato</p></li><li><p>Nocturne in Eb major, Op. 9, No. 2 (1832)Nocturne:</p></li><li><p>Franz Liszt (1811-1886)Flamboyant artistic personalityCompositions demand great virtuosity Established the modern piano recitalEtude:</p></li><li><p>Transcendental Etude No. 8 Wilde Jagd (1851)Wild Hunt</p><p>Figure 22.1 A large concert grand piano once owned by Franz Liszt and now in the Liszt Museum in Budapest, Hungary. The instrument was made by the Chickering Piano Company of Boston (the largest U.S. piano manufacturer before the appearance of the Steinway Company) and shipped overseas to Liszt as a marketing tool: If Liszt plays a Chickering, so, young American, should you!</p><p>*Figure 22.2 A superbly Romantic portrait of Chopin by his friend Eugne Delacroix. It was originally painted with Chopin next to George Sand (see Fig. 22.3). But in 1870, a vandal slashed the double portrait, thereby (unintentionally) creating two canvases.</p><p>*Figure 22.4 The young, charismatic Franz Liszt, the preeminent pianist of the Romantic era.</p><p>*</p></li></ul>