challenging homophobic language

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Challenging Homophobic Language. School Name. Aims. To help schools challenge and respond to homophobia in the context of developing an inclusive, safer and more successful school environment for all. Objectives. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Challenging Homophobic Language

    School Name

  • AimsTo help schools challenge and respond to homophobia in the context of developing an inclusive, safer and more successful school environment for all.

  • ObjectivesTo examine the impact which homophobic language can have on pupils and school communityTo develop and practice different ways of responding to homophobic languageTo explore ways of preventing homophobic language through a collective approach

  • AuditDiscussion in groups

  • StereotypesAs a group call out all the names, phrases, stereotypes and labels that are associated with each groupLesbianGay ManBisexualHeterosexualThink about when we first begin to form our sexual identity early ageWhat impact do we think this could have on an LGB person?

  • Experience of Homophobia in Every Day Life Experiencing Homophobia

    In an open place (including from strangers) 44.2Visiting Bars13.2Visiting Youth Club9.1Being provided health services2.6Voluntary Community organisations2.6At school from other students51.9At school from staff15At work from staff/colleagues19.8At home from neighbours14At home from other tenants 7

    Visiting restaurants and other eateries13.2

    (source: Out On Your Own, McNamee, 2006)

  • Effects of Homophobia on Mental Health

  • The Statistics99 per cent of lesbian, gay and bisexual young people hear phrases such as thats so gay or youre so gay in school

    Only 10 per cent of gay young people say that staff intervene every time they hear homophobic language

    84 per cent of gay young people are distressed when they hear the word gay used as an insult

    68 per cent of parents dont know if their childrens school has policies to tackle homophobic language.

  • Social NetworkingSo gay: used on average over 10,000 times daily

    No homo: used on average over 10,000 times daily

    Faggot: used on average over 45,000 times daily

    Dyke: used on average over 4,000 times dailyNoHomophobes.com looks at the use of homophobic language on Twitter and found that:

  • Barriers to Tackling Homophobic LanguageYoung people tell us that homophobic language it is rarely treated in the same way as racist or sexist language.

    Almost half of secondary school teachers and a quarter of primary school teachers think that the homophobic language they hear is just harmless banter.

  • Barriers to Tackling Homophobic LanguageOne in six secondary school teachers say homophobic language is too common to intervene in every instance.

    Nearly one in five gay young people (17 per cent) say that teachers within a school make homophobic comments.

    The biggest barrier to tackling homophobic language is a lack of training and support. Most teachers want to challenge homophobic language but lack the confidence to do so.

  • What Schools can do the BasicsThere are many different ways to go about tackling homophobic language, but the most important thing is to get the policies and processes in place to underpin your work

  • The BasicsPolicyParentsTrainingTaken seriouslyConsistencyEvaluate interventions and follow up with staffReporting and recordingExplaining Language

  • Why should we challenge homophobic language?

  • Schools have a duty to safeguard the wellbeing of all young people in their care. Failure to respond to homophobic language can have an impact on pupils confidence and self-esteem, as well as their attainment at school.

  • How should we respond to homophobic language?

  • That is sooooo GAY!Rarely referring to sexual orientation

    Remind pupils what gay means;- that its not a negative thing; - that its hurtful to people who are gay and to young people whose parents and carers, family members, or friends are gay.

    Remember, schools always tackle racist language. The use of homophobic language should always be challenged in the same way

  • ResponsesOrganisationalQuestionChallengeI messages

  • Organisational ResponsesThe ground rules we agreed at the beginning of the lesson said we would show respect to others.The school anti-bullying/behaviour policy is clear that homophobic language will not be tolerated.This school does not tolerate language like that.

  • QuestionWhat do you mean by that?What makes you think that?Do you mean that as a compliment or an insult?Do you realise that what you said is homophobic?Would you feel happy if someone was talking like that about your sister/brother?Can you explain what you mean by calling that (object) gay?

  • ChallengeLanguage like that is not acceptable.

    You might not think that remark is offensive, but many would.

    Let us talk about why people think like that.

  • I MessagesI am not happy with what you said.I am really surprised to hear you using that type of homophobic language.

  • Putting it into Practice3 Scenarios

    Discus each scenario with your group.

    Decide on what you would feel comfortable saying to challenge the pupils in the scenarios given.

  • Scenario 1You are walking past a group of year 9 boys who you do not teach. You over hear one say, Mr. Kennedy is a right fruit.

  • Scenario 2Mark is new to the school and is in your Year 8 form group. As the form group come into the class you hear Louise say, Mark, those trainers you are wearing are really gay.

  • Scenario 3You over hear a group of girls talking about a girl in the year group who has same sex parents. Amy says, I bet Julies a lezzer too. The group are laughing loudly at this.

  • Scenario 1The school policy says that we are all responsible for making the school a safe place for students and teachers. That kind of language is homophobic and will make people feel unsafe. Therefore it is not acceptable.

    Have you ever considered what it must be like for gay people to hear that kind of stuff? How do you think it is going to make them feel?

  • You can not tell whether someone is gay or straight just from how they look or behave. Gay people are all very different, just like straight people are.

    I am really surprised and disappointed to hear you say that. I hoped you would recognise that it is important to treat everyone, including gay people, with respect and that it is therefore wrong to use such homophobic language.

  • Scenario 2That kind of language is homophobic and you know it is against school policy to make homophobic remarks. Homophobia is as bad as racism and sexism.

    What do you mean they are gay? Is that a compliment? You are right; Abduls trainers are very nice!

  • Have you ever considered what it must be like for gay people to hear that kind of stuff? How do you think it is going to make them feel if they keep hearing the word gay used in a negative way?

    I am really disappointed to hear you talking in that way. I hoped you would welcome new students and make them feel supported. I also thought you would realise that using the word gay in a negative way is offensive to gay people and therefore would not use that kind of homophobic language.

  • Scenario 3Amy, in this school, we do not use homophobic language like that. There is nothing wrong with being a lesbian.How do you think Julie feels hearing you talk about her mum like that? How do you think her mum would feel? Would you like it if someone said nasty things about your mum?

  • It does not matter whether someone has two mums or two dads. The important thing is that they love and look after each other and that they love and look after their children.I am really disappointed to hear you talk like that Amy. I hoped you had realise that it is important to be kind to everyone.

  • Top 10What we CAN do

  • TEACHERS AND SCHOOL STAFF MUST CHALLENGE HOMOPHOBIC LANGUAGE EVERY TIME THEY HEAR IT1

  • MAKE SURE THAT PUPILS UNDERSTAND WHY HOMOPHOBIC LANGUAGE IS OFFENSIVE2

  • INCLUDE HOMOPHOBIC LANGUAGE IN ANTI-BULLYING POLICIES AND PROCEDURES3

  • INVOLVE SENIOR MANAGERS IF HOMOPHOBICLANGUAGE PERSISTS4

  • INVOLVE PARENTS IF PUPILS PERSIST5

  • INCORPORATE LESBIAN, GAY AND BISEXUAL PEOPLE INTO THE CURRICULUM6

  • ADDRESS HOMOPHOBIA AND LGB EQUALITY IN YOUR LESSONS7

  • USE ASSEMBLIES TO ADDRESS PROBLEMS OR PROMOTEPOSITIVE MESSAGES ABOUT GAY PEOPLE8

  • USE POSTERS AND PUBLIC DISPLAYS9

  • INVOLVE PUPILS10

  • SignpostingIt is important for a young person to know about the support organisations which exist in Northern Ireland. These organisations are best-placed to answer any in-depth questions a young person may have, they can provide support and advice in a professional and affirming way.

    HERE NI - 028 9024 9452 Lesbian Line - 028 9023 8668hello@hereni.org

    The Rainbow Project 028 9031 9030 Gay Helpline 028 9032 2023 gavin@rainbow-project.org

    Cara-Friend 028 9089 0202 Youth Action 028 9024 0551admin@cara-friend.org.uk

    GLYNI 028 9089 0202mark.brown@cara-friend.org.uk

    Belfast Education and Library Board Gillian Cuthbertgillian.cuthbert@belb.co.uk

    *The past five years have seen significant progress in tacklinghomophobic bullying in Britains schools. Research by the Universityof Cambridge for Stonewall in The School Report 2012, a survey of1,600 lesbian, gay and bisexual young people, found that whilelevels of homophobic bullying remain high they have fallen by 15per cent over the past five years. The number of schools explicitlysaying that homophobic bullying is wrong has more than doubledand gay y