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Ukiyo-e first brochure

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  • The Shadows, Dreams, & Substance

    The Floating WorldOf

    Ukiyo-eINFORMATIONFebruary28May7,2012Ryerson and Burnham Librarieshttp://www.artic.edu/aic/

    Museum HoursMondayWednesday,10:305:00Thursday,10:308:00FridaySunday,10:305:00

    Admission Adults: $18Children, Students, and Seniors (65 and up): $12Children under 14: FreeMembers: Free

    Sponsorship:This exhibition, catalog, and programming were made possible by the generous support of Ford

    Conservation of the works in this exhibition was made possible through a grant from The United States-Japan Foundation.

  • MAIN CONTENT:

    This exhibition showcases the Museums spectacular holdings of Japanese prints, books, and drawings from the 17th to the 19th centuries. These works are complemented by related works from the museums collections created by Japanese and Westerns artists into the 20th century.

    The Floating World of Ukiyo-e: Shadows, Dreams, and Substance showcases the museums spectacular holdings of Japanese Ukiyo-e (translated as pictures of the floating, or sorrowful, world) and is the first public viewing of this important and previously un-seen collection. Featured are selected Ukiyo-e prints, books, and drawings from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries and other related works from the Librarys collections created by Japanese and Western artists into the twentieth century.

    The museum owes its extensive holdings of Ukiyo-e prints and printed books to a host of different collectors, including Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and President William Howard Taft. However, the most extensive collection of Ukiyo-e at the Library was assembled by Crosby Stuart Noyes (1825-1908), an owner and editor-in-chief of the for-mer Washington Evening Star. In giving the collection to the Library in 1905, Mr. Noyes expressed the hope that the collection would be an illustration of the extraordinary variety in Japanese art and an instructive and timely insight into their history and culture.In presenting this exhibition, the offers its visitors The Art Institute of Chicago the opportunity to see the beauty and the meaning that motivated Crosby Stuart Noyes and others to collect these materials.