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Kinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e ©2008, McGraw- Hill/Irwin Management A Practical Introduction Third Edition Angelo Kinicki & Brian K. Williams

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Management A Practical Introduction Third EditionAngelo Kinicki & Brian K. Williams

Kinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin

Chapter 1: The Exceptional Manager

What You Do, How You Do ItRewards Six Challenges Four Functions Levels & Areas of Management Roles Managers Play Entrepreneurship Skills Managers NeedKinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2

1.1 Management: What It Is, What Its Benefits AreManagement is defined as 1) the pursuit of organizational goals efficiently and effectively by 2) integrating the work of people through 3) planning, organizing, leading, and controlling the organizations resources

Kinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 3

1.1 Management: What It Is, What Its Benefits AreWHY ORGANIZATIONS VALUE MANAGERS: THE MULTIPLIER EFFECT Good managers create value through the multiplier effect where their influence on the organization is multiplied beyond what could be achieved by someone acting alone

Kinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 4

1.1 Management: What It Is, What Its Benefits AreYou can benefit from studying and practicing management by learning how to deal with organizations from the outside understanding how to relate to supervisors and how to interact with coworkers understanding how to manage yourself in the workplace experiencing a sense of accomplishment stretching your abilities and magnifying your range of accomplishments building a catalog of successful products or services

Kinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 5

Chapter 1: The Exceptional ManagerCLASSROOM PERFORMANCE SYSTEMWhich of the following is not a reward from studying management? A) building a catalog of successful products or services B) understanding how to relate to supervisors C) understanding how to interact with coworkers D) understanding how to deal with organizations from the outsideKinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 6

1.2 Six Challenges To Being A Star ManagerCHALLENGE #1: MANAGING FOR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGESTAYING AHEAD OF RIVALS Competitive advantage is the ability of an organization to produce goods or services more efficiently than competitors do, thereby outperforming them

Kinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 7

Chapter 1: The Exceptional ManagerCLASSROOM PERFORMANCE SYSTEM In order to stay ahead of rivals, firms need to be better at all of the following except A) innovation B) implementation C) efficiency D) qualityKinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 8

1.2 Six Challenges To Being A Star ManagerCHALLENGE #2: MANAGING FOR DIVERSITYTHE FUTURE WONT RESEMBLE THE PAST In the future, managers will be challenged to maximize the contributions of employees that are diverse in gender, age, race, and ethnicity

Kinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 9

1.2 Six Challenges To Being A Star ManagerCHALLENGE #3: MANAGING FOR GLOBALIZATIONTHE EXPANDING MANAGEMENT UNIVERSE

Managing for globalization is a complex, ongoing challenge It is important for managers to understand how cultural differences affect an organization

Kinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 10

1.2 Six Challenges To Being A Star ManagerCHALLENGE #4: MANAGING FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Managing the Internet (the global network of independently operating but interconnected computers, linking hundreds of thousands of smaller networks around the world) is perhaps the biggest information technology challenge for managers

Kinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 11

1.2 Six Challenges To Being A Star ManagerCHALLENGE #5: MANAGING FOR ETHICAL STANDARDS Pressure to meet sales, production, and other targets can create ethical dilemmas for managers CHALLENGE #6: MANAGING FOR YOUR OWN HAPPINESS AND LIFE GOALS Managers need to consider whether meeting the organizations challenges is also personally fulfillingKinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 12

Chapter 1: The Exceptional ManagerCLASSROOM PERFORMANCE SYSTEM Which of the following is not one of the four management functions? A) planning B) controlling C) leading D) implementing

Kinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 13

1.3 What Managers Do: The Four Principal FunctionsWHAT MANAGERS DO: THE FOUR PRINICPAL FUNCTIONSPlanning is setting goals and deciding how to achieve them Organizing involves arranging tasks, people, and other resources to accomplish work Leading is defined as motivating, directing, and otherwise influencing people to work hard to achieve the organizations goals Controlling involves monitoring performance, comparing it with goals, and taking corrective action as neededKinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 14

1.3 What Managers Do: The Four Principal Functions Figure 1.1: The Management Process

Kinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 15

1.4 Pyramid Power: Levels & Areas of ManagementPYRAMID POWER: LEVELS & AREAS OF MANAGEMENTThere are three levels of management: top managers make long-term decisions about the overall direction of the organization and establish its objectives, policies, and strategies middle managers implement the policies and plans of the top managers above them and supervise and coordinate the activities of the first-line managers below them first line managers make short-term operating decisions, directing the daily tasks of non-managerial personnelKinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 16

1.4 Pyramid Power: Levels & Areas of ManagementFigure 1.2: The Levels and Areas of Management

Kinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 17

1.4 Pyramid Power: Levels & Areas of ManagementAREAS OF MANAGEMENT: FUNCTIONAL MANAGERS VERSUS GENERAL MANAGERS Organizations are run by two types of managers: functional managers are responsible for just one organizational activity for example Director of Finance general managers are responsible for several organizational activities like Executive Vice PresidentKinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 18

1.4 Pyramid Power: Levels & Areas of ManagementThere are three types of organizations: for-profit organizations are formed to make money by selling products or services nonprofit organizations offer services without making a profit mutual-benefit organizations like trade associations advance members interests Managers perform the same management functions regardless of the type of organization

Kinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 19

1.5 Roles Managers Must Play SuccessfullyTo be successful, managers must be able to play three roles: Interpersonal roles (figurehead, leader, and liaison) involve managers interacting with people inside and outside their work units Informational roles (monitor, disseminator, and spokesperson) require managers to receive and communicate information Decisional roles (entrepreneur, disturbance handler, resource allocator, and negotiator) require managers to make decisions to solve problems or take advantage of opportunitiesKinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 20

Chapter 1: The Exceptional ManagerCLASSROOM PERFORMANCE SYSTEM Which of the following is an informational role? A) entrepreneur B) liaison C) monitor D) negotiator

Kinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 21

1.6 The Entrepreneurial SpiritTHE ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT Entrepreneurship is the process of taking risks to create a new enterprise An entrepreneur is someone who sees a new opportunity for a product or service and launches a business to try to realize it An intrapreneur is someone who works inside an existing organization who sees an opportunity for a product or service and mobilizes the organizations resources to try to realize itKinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 22

1.6 The Entrepreneurial SpiritHow Do Entrepreneurs & Managers Differ? Entrepreneurs start businesses, managers grow or maintain businesses Both entrepreneurs and managers -have a high need for achievement -believe in personal control of destiny -have high energy levels and an action orientation -have a high tolerance for ambiguityKinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 23

1.7 The Skills Star Managers NeedTHE SKILLS STAR MANAGERS NEEDGood managers need to have technical skills -the ability to perform a specific job conceptual skills -the ability to think analytically and human skills -the ability to interact with others Today, companies want managers with -the ability to motivate and engage others -the ability to communicate -work experience outside the U.S. -the energy to meet the demands of global travel and a 24/7 worldKinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 24

Chapter 1: The Exceptional ManagerCLASSROOM PERFORMANCE SYSTEM Which of the following is not one of the three skills managers should cultivate? A) technical skills B) entrepreneurial skills C) conceptual skills D) human skillsKinicki/Williams, Management: A Practical Introduction 3e 2008, McGraw-Hill/Irwin 25