captionmaker and maccaption quick start guide · quick start guide captionmaker and maccaption 6.5...

of 56 /56
Quick Start Guide CaptionMaker and MacCaption 6.5 Quick Start Guide 196474 July 2016

Author: others

Post on 29-Jul-2020

24 views

Category:

Documents


0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Quick Start Guide

    CaptionMaker and MacCaption 6.5Quick Start Guide

    196474 July 2016

  • Copyrights and Trademark NoticesCopyright © 2016 Telestream, LLC. All rights reserved worldwide. No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted, transcribed, altered, or translated into any languages without the written permission of Telestream. Information and specifications in this document are subject to change without notice and do not represent a commitment on the part of Telestream.

    Telestream. Telestream, CaptionMaker, Episode, Flip4Mac, FlipFactory, Flip Player, Lightspeed, ScreenFlow, Switch, Vantage, Wirecast, Gameshow, GraphicsFactory, MetaFlip, and Split-and-Stitch are registered trademarks and MacCaption, e-Captioning, Pipeline, Post Producer, Tempo, TrafficManager, and VOD Producer are trademarks of Telestream, LLC. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

    Apple. QuickTime, MacOS X, and Safari are trademarks of Apple, Inc. Bonjour, the Bonjour logo, and the Bonjour symbol are trademarks of Apple, Inc.

    MainConcept. MainConcept is a registered trademark of MainConcept LLC and MainConcept AG. Copyright 2004 MainConcept Multimedia Technologies.

    Microsoft. Microsoft, Windows NT|2000|XP|XP Professional|Server 2003|Server 2008 |Server 2012, Windows 7, Windows 8, Media Player, Media Encoder, .Net, Internet Explorer, SQL Server 2005|2008|Server 2012, and Windows Media Technologies are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.

    Manzanita. Manzanita is a registered trademark of Manzanita Systems, Inc.

    Adobe. Adobe® HTTP Dynamic Streaming Copyright © 2014 of Adobe Systems All right reserved.

    Avid. Portions of this product Copyright 2012 Avid Technology, Inc.

    VoiceAge. This product is manufactured by Telestream under license from VoiceAge Corporation.

    x.264 LLC. The product is manufactured by Telestream under license from x.264 LLC.

    Dolby. Dolby and the double-D symbol are registered trademarks of Dolby Laboratories.

    Google. VP6 and VP8 Copyright Google Inc. 2014 All rights Reserved.

    Fraunhofer IIS and Thomson Multimedia. MPEG Layer-3 audio coding technology licensed from Fraunhofer IIS and Thomson Multimedia.

    SharpSSH2. SharpSSH2 Copyright (c) 2008, Ryan Faircloth. All rights reserved. Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:

    Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

  • 3

    Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

    Neither the name of Diversified Sales and Service, Inc. nor the names of its contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission.

    THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS “AS IS” AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

    Telerik. RadControls for ASP.NET AJAX copyright Telerik All rights reserved.

    Xceed. The Software is Copyright ©1994-2012 Xceed Software Inc., all rights reserved.

    MediaInfo. Copyright © 2002-2013 MediaArea.net SARL. All rights reserved.

    THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS AS IS AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT HOLDER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

    ZLIB. Copyright (C) 1995-2013 Jean-loup Gailly and Mark Adler.

  • 4

    Other brands, product names, and company names are trademarks of their respective holders, and are used for identification purpose only.

    MPEG Disclaimers

    MPEGLA MPEG2 PatentANY USE OF THIS PRODUCT IN ANY MANNER OTHER THAN PERSONAL USE THAT COMPLIES WITH THE MPEG-2 STANDARD FOR ENCODING VIDEO INFORMATION FOR PACKAGED MEDIA IS EXPRESSLY PROHIBITED WITHOUT A LICENSE UNDER APPLICABLE PATENTS IN THE MPEG-2 PATENT PORTFOLIO, WHICH LICENSE IS AVAILABLE FROM MPEG LA, LLC, 4600 S. Ulster Street, Suite 400, Denver, Colorado 80237 U.S.A.

    MPEGLA MPEG4 VISUALTHIS PRODUCT IS LICENSED UNDER THE MPEG-4 VISUAL PATENT PORTFOLIO LICENSE FOR THE PERSONAL AND NON-COMMERCIAL USE OF A CONSUMER FOR (i) ENCODING VIDEO IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE MPEG-4 VISUAL STANDARD (“MPEG-4 VIDEO”) AND/OR (ii) DECODING MPEG-4 VIDEO THAT WAS ENCODED BY A CONSUMER ENGAGED IN A PERSONAL AND NON-COMMERCIAL ACTIVITY AND/OR WAS OBTAINED FROM A VIDEO PROVIDER LICENSE IS GRANTED OR SHALL BE IMPLIED FOR ANY OTHER USE. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION INCLUDING THAT RELATING TO PROMOTIONAL, INTERNAL AND COMMERCIAL USES AND LICENSING MAY BE OBTAINED FROM MPEG LA, LLC. SEE HTTP://WWW.MPEGLA.COM.

    MPEGLA AVCTHIS PRODUCT IS LICENSED UNDER THE AVC PATENT PORTFOLIO LICENSE FOR THE PERSONAL USE OF A CONSUMER OR OTHER USES IN WHICH IT DOES NOT RECEIVE REMUNERATION TO (i) ENCODE VIDEO IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE AVC STANDARD (“AVC VIDEO”) AND/OR (ii) DECODE AVC VIDEO THAT WAS ENCODED BY A CONSUMER ENGAGED IN A PERSONAL ACTIVITY AND/OR WAS OBTAINED FROM A VIDEO PROVIDER LICENSED TO PROVIDE AVC VIDEO. NO LICENSE IS GRANTED OR SHALL BE IMPLIED FOR ANY OTHER USE. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM MPEG LA, L.L.C. SEE HTTP://WWW.MPEGLA.COM.

    MPEG4 SYSTEMSTHIS PRODUCT IS LICENSED UNDER THE MPEG-4 SYSTEMS PATENT PORTFOLIO LICENSE FOR ENCODING IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE MPEG-4 SYSTEMS STANDARD, EXCEPT THAT AN ADDITIONAL LICENSE AND PAYMENT OF ROYALTIES ARE NECESSARY FOR ENCODING IN CONNECTION WITH (i) DATA STORED OR REPLICATED IN PHYSICAL MEDIA WHICH IS PAID FOR ON A TITLE BY TITLE BASIS AND/OR (ii) DATA WHICH IS PAID FOR ON A TITLE BY TITLE BASIS AND IS TRANSMITTED TO AN END USER FOR PERMANENT STORAGE AND/OR USE. SUCH ADDITIONAL LICENSE MAY BE OBTAINED FROM MPEG LA, LLC. SEE HTTP://WWW.MPEGLA.COM FOR ADDITIONAL DETAILS.

  • 5

    Limited Warranty and DisclaimersTelestream, LLC. (the Company) warrants to the original registered end user that the product will perform as stated below for a period of one (1) year from the date of shipment from factory:

    Hardware and Media—The Product hardware components, if any, including equipment supplied but not manufactured by the Company but NOT including any third party equipment that has been substituted by the Distributor for such equipment (the “Hardware”), will be free from defects in materials and workmanship under normal operating conditions and use.

    Warranty RemediesYour sole remedies under this limited warranty are as follows:

    Hardware and Media—The Company will either repair or replace (at its option) any defective Hardware component or part, or Software Media, with new or like new Hardware components or Software Media. Components may not be necessarily the same, but will be of equivalent operation and quality.

    Software UpdatesExcept as may be provided in a separate agreement between Telestream and You, if any, Telestream is under no obligation to maintain or support the Software and Telestream has no obligation to furnish you with any further assistance, technical support, documentation, software, update, upgrades, or information of any nature or kind.

    Restrictions and Conditions of Limited WarrantyThis Limited Warranty will be void and of no force and effect if (i) Product Hardware or Software Media, or any part thereof, is damaged due to abuse, misuse, alteration, neglect, or shipping, or as a result of service or modification by a party other than the Company, or (ii) Software is modified without the written consent of the Company.

    Limitations of WarrantiesTHE EXPRESS WARRANTIES SET FORTH IN THIS AGREEMENT ARE IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, ANY WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. No oral or written information or advice given by the Company, its distributors, dealers or agents, shall increase the scope of this Limited Warranty or create any new warranties.

    Geographical Limitation of Warranty—This limited warranty is valid only within the country in which the Product is purchased/licensed.

  • 6

    Limitations on Remedies—YOUR EXCLUSIVE REMEDIES, AND THE ENTIRE LIABILITY OF TELESTREAM, LLC. WITH RESPECT TO THE PRODUCT, SHALL BE AS STATED IN THIS LIMITED WARRANTY. Your sole and exclusive remedy for any and all breaches of any Limited Warranty by the Company shall be the recovery of reasonable damages which, in the aggregate, shall not exceed the total amount of the combined license fee and purchase price paid by you for the Product.

    DamagesTELESTREAM, LLC. SHALL NOT BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR ANY DAMAGES, INCLUDING ANY LOST PROFITS, LOST SAVINGS, OR OTHER INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF YOUR USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE PRODUCT, OR THE BREACH OF ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY, EVEN IF THE COMPANY HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF THOSE DAMAGES, OR ANY REMEDY PROVIDED FAILS OF ITS ESSENTIAL PURPOSE.

    Further information regarding this limited warranty may be obtained by writing:Telestream, LLC.848 Gold Flat RoadNevada City, CA 95959 USA

    You can call Telestream, LLC. via telephone at (530) 470-1300.

  • 7

    Contents

    Overview 9Introduction 9Video Tutorials and Support 9Comparing Software Versions 10Prerequisites for Captioning 11

    Transcribing a Video 11Using a Video File 11

    Automatic Time Stamp (ATS) 12Requirements for ATS 12ATS Results 12Best Practices for ATS 12

    Caption Style Guidelines 13Captions vs. Subtitles 14

    Captions 14Subtitles 14

    Installation 15Installing and Activating CaptionMaker 16

    Buying and Activating CaptionMaker 17Activating CaptionMaker Offline 19Upgrading CaptionMaker 22

    Activating a CaptionMaker Upgrade 22Deactivating a CaptionMaker License 24

    Installing and Activating MacCaption 25Buying and Activating MacCaption 26Activating MacCaption Offline 28Upgrading MacCaption 31

    Activating a MacCaption Upgrade 32Deactivating Your MacCaption License 34

    Quick Start 35Introduction to CaptionMaker 35

  • Contents8

    Importing Text Files 35Opening a Movie in CaptionMaker 37Formatting Text 38Row Operations 39Synchronizing Captions (Time Stamping) 40

    Manual Time Stamping 40Checking the Timing 40

    Preview Play 40Caption and Video Playback Controls in CaptionMaker 41

    Introduction to MacCaption 42Importing Text Files 42Opening a Movie in MacCaption 43Formatting Text 43Row Operations 45Synchronizing Captions (Time Stamping) 45

    Manual Time Stamping 45Checking the Timing 45

    Preview Play 46Caption and Video Playback Controls in MacCaption 47

    J-K-L Playback Control 48Exporting Your Finished Project 49

    Exporting Standalone Caption Files 49Embedding Captions into Video 49File-based Delivery for Broadcast TV 49

    Get the TV Station Spec Sheet 50Get a Sample Captioned Video File 50Use Switch to Perform a Test 50Overview of TV Formats 50Next Steps for Delivery to the TV Station 51

    Tape Delivery for Broadcast TV 51Adobe Premiere 52Avid Media Composer 52Final Cut Pro 52Other 52

    Subtitle Files 52Captioning for the Web and Mobile Devices 53

    Post-Production (VOD) Web Captioning 53DVD/Blu-ray 54

    DVD Closed Captioning 54DVD/Blu-ray Subtitle Formats 54

    Subtitling 54Exporting Subtitles 54

    Playing or Converting Captioned Video Files 55

  • 9

    Overview

    IntroductionThis Quick Start Guide will help you install and learn the basics of CaptionMaker and MacCaption. The following topics are included:

    Overview—the chapter you’re reading now, introduces key concepts

    Installation—provides step-by-step installation procedures

    Quick Start—introduces how to use the products

    This guide includes links to additional helpful information on our Website: telestream.net. Check the website periodically for updates of this document.

    For complete instructions on using CaptionMaker see the CaptionMaker User Guide. This is available from Help > User Guide (Local), and from the Telestream web site.

    When you purchase CaptionMaker or MacCaption, you will receive a software license key. You can easily download and install the license key by clicking on our downloads page at telestream.net and following the instructions.

    Note: As of version 6.3 of CaptionMaker and MacCaption, they only support Desktop, Pro, and Enterprise licenses issued by Telestream. If you purchased CaptionMaker or MacCaption prior to October 2013, you need to upgrade to a Telestream Desktop, Pro, or Enterprise license before upgrading to the current software version. Please contact Telestream for more information.

    CAUTION: Do not lose your license key because your software will not work without it, and you will be charged to replace it.

    Video Tutorials and Support Telestream offers video tutorials and support:

    • Video tutorials: http://www.telestream.net/captioning/resources.htm

    • Telestream Tech Support: http://www.telestream.net/telestream‐support/caption‐ing/support.htm

    http://www.telestream.nethttp://www.telestream.nethttp://www.telestream.net/captioning/resources.htmhttp://www.telestream.net/telestream-support/captioning/support.htmhttp://www.telestream.net/telestream-support/captioning/support.htm

  • OverviewComparing Software Versions

    10

    Comparing Software VersionsThe CaptionMaker and MacCaption applications are available in 3 levels:

    • Desktop• Pro• Enterprise

    Please refer to the chart below for the features of each level. You can purchase a software upgrade from one level to another to add capabilities.

    Table 1. CaptionMaker and MacCaption Feature Comparison

    Target uses Caption authoring Caption authoring, QC,asset management, TV broadcast exports

    Automation & high volumecaption asset management

    Target customers Corporate, Independent, academic, government,

    houses of worship

    Caption service providers,TV networks, Post facilities

    Major networks, contentproviders, asset management &

    distribution services

    Authoring/ExportsCaption Authoring, Timing and Formatting

    Auto Time Stamp (sync text and audio)

    Caption Asset Management (Imports/Conversions)

    AutomationBatch processing (GUI)Scripting & External Control (CLI)

    * MacCaption only feature † CaptionMaker only feature

    Desktop Pro Enterprise

    Export SCC (CEA-608) & MCC (CEA-708) files

    Streaming/Mobile Video (SMPTE 2052 timed text--TTML and DFXP, Vimeo, Safari, Android, WebVTT, SRT, iOS, YouTube, WMV, SAMI, etc.)

    Burn-in Subtitles and Basic DVD Subtitles

    Subtitle overlay (movie w/alpha channel,Advanced DVD/Blu-ray subtitles)

    TV broadcast and VOD media(ProRes*, MPEG-2, H.264, MXF, Avid AAF, tape, etc.)

    Export caption interchange files (CAP, TDS,ULT, EBU-STL, etc.)

    V-chip/XDS/AFD Encoding

    Live captioning † (via hardware encoder orweb stream, such as YouTube)

    Reformat Pop-on Roll-up

    Extract CC from video files (MOV, MXF, MPEG-2, etc.)

    Import interchange files (Cheetah CAP, TDS,ULT, PAC, EBU-STL, etc.)

    Import plain text, SCC & MCC, web formats

    Assemble Captions* (Conform to EDL)

    Time Tailor (Non-linear Retiming)

    √ √

    OP-47 Teletext for MXF Workflows † √ √

    Import Nexidia QC .XML Report †

    √ √

  • Overview Prerequisites for Captioning

    11

    Prerequisites for CaptioningThe two ingredients you need to start captioning a video are: (1) a video file, and (2) a transcript of the dialog in the video.

    Transcribing a VideoThere is no magic solution to transcription. It is by far the most time-consuming aspect of the closed captioning/subtitling process. However, there are methods to transcribe in the most efficient way possible. If you do not have a script of the video, you can efficiently produce the script in one of these ways:

    • Type the script on a regular keyboard. You can also use a foot pedal to speed up the transcription process by allowing you to control the video playback with your foot so that you can keep both hands on the keyboard.

    • Train speech recognition software to recognize one person’s voice and produce a transcript by listening to the video and repeating the dialog. Speech recognition software, such as Dragon Naturally Speaking, only recognizes one speaker's voice at a time, and that person must go through a voice training process with the soft-ware. You can't feed in various speakers' voices and expect to get a good result.

    You can use a process called Shadow Speaking, or Voice Captioning. For this pro-cess you train a profile of one person’s voice into the Dragon Naturally Speaking software so that it can recognize the speech accurately. Then you watch the video and repeat all of the dialogue into a headset microphone. This takes a little practice to get good at listening and speaking at the same time, but for most people, it's much faster than typing on a regular keyboard. As you continue to use the software and correct the errors, you can eventually expect to reach around 95% accuracy.

    • Use a professional transcription service. This is the easiest way to generate the script, and can be cost-effective.

    • Mac OS X also has built-in speech to text. This can be leveraged using the built-in microphone on a laptop or with a 3rd party USB microphone. When a microphone is present and MacCaption is open, users can press the "fn" key on the keyboard twice to enable this speech-to-text feature. This allows users to transcribe with their voice directly into the MacCaption text cell area.

    MacCaption and CaptionMaker can import scripts from a text file and most word processors, such as Word files. However, because of special formatting and characters used in some kinds of document files, it is usually best to start with a plain text (.txt) file.

    Using a Video FileThe other ingredient you need for producing captions is a video file. Make sure you are using a digital video file, not videotape, as your video source. MacCaption and CaptionMaker can play back most types of QuickTime files (Mac/Windows), and also Windows Media files (Windows). If you have another file format, please see the MacCaption or CaptionMaker User Guide about making a proxy movie for use with the captioning software.

  • OverviewAutomatic Time Stamp (ATS)

    12

    Automatic Time Stamp (ATS)In most other captioning software, even after you import the transcript and video, you must go through a time consuming process to manually synchronize each piece of text so that it appears at the correct time in the video.

    Auto Time Stamp automatically synchronizes the text transcript with your audio or video file, dramatically reducing the time it takes to caption a video. This feature works very well for videos with high quality audio and containing mostly dialog. It does not work as well if the audio has already been mixed with music or sound effects, so it is preferable to use a dialog-only audio mix.

    Requirements for ATS• A video with a clear high quality audio dialog track, in the English language, with

    very little background noise or other interfering sounds.

    • An accurate transcript of all the dialogue in the video.

    • See our System Requirements Web page for minimum computer specs:http://www.telestream.net/captioning/tech‐specs.htm

    ATS ResultsWhen you run an Automatic Time Stamp operation, the following occurs:

    • Automatically synchronizes each caption; no need to manually time stamp captions.

    • The process is much faster than real-time (15 times to 30 times faster, depending on the speed of your computer).

    • The software automatically detects captions with poor synchronization and high-lights them in red, so you can spot check and manually correct these captions.

    Best Practices for ATSThe following are important points to consider for getting the best results from an Automatic Time Stamp operation:

    • An accurate transcript is vital. To get good results, the transcript cannot deviate sig-nificantly from the audio.

    • High quality audio is also the key. Compression, sound effects or music can distort the dialog.

    • Speaker IDs that are indicated with “>> Name:” are treated as unspoken text.

    • Non-verbal information in the transcript, such as music or sound effect indications, should be enclosed by brackets such as this: [MUSIC], or [Applause].

    • If the software highlights some caption lines as low confidence, you might want to do a quick Preview Play to spot check these sections. In many cases the low confi-dence sections may be fine or close enough for your needs. If not, you can do a manual time stamp just on these few sections to improve the alignment.

    • Auto Time Stamp supports English language audio only.

    http://www.telestream.net/captioning/tech-specs.htm

  • Overview Caption Style Guidelines

    13

    Caption Style GuidelinesAdhering to good caption style is very important. The following is an excerpt from the Described and Captioned Media Program (DCMP), web site - http://www.dcmp.org/:

    Captioning is the key to opening up a world of information for persons with hearing loss or literacy needs. There are more than 30 million Americans with some type of hearing loss. Millions of others are illiterate, learning to read, or use English as a second language.

    The first captioning of any kind was performed in the late 1950's by Captioned Films for the Deaf, the ancestor of DCMP, two decades before the advent of closed captioning on broadcast television. The first edition of the Captioning Key was published in 1994, and these guidelines were based on decades of experience by DCMP (then called Captioned Films and Videos Program), review of captioning research, and examination of standards developed by various captioning vendors. The Captioning Key has been applied to both entertain-ment and educational media, has been used for consumers at all levels (chil-dren through adults), has received international distribution, and has been translated into other languages.

    These guidelines are a key for vendors performing captioning for the DCMP. The vendor list can be found at this URL: http://www.dcmp.org/caai/nadh11.pdf. The DCMP provides information on how to become an approved vendor on the DCMP Web site.

    The information is applicable to vendors and other businesses that provide closed captioning (CC) and subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing (SDH) of all types of media at various levels. Thus, these guidelines will also be useful to media producers/distributors and others considering captioning their products or learning about captioning.

    The Captioning Key guidelines are available in PDF from the DCMP at:http://www.captioningkey.org/captioning-key.pdf

    A Spanish translation of the Captioning Key is also available:http://www.dcmp.org/caai/nadh52.pdf

    http://www.dcmp.orghttp://www.dcmp.org/caai/nadh11.pdfhttp://www.captioningkey.org/captioning-key.pdfhttp://www.dcmp.org/caai/nadh52.pdf

  • OverviewCaptions vs. Subtitles

    14

    Captions vs. SubtitlesCaptions are text that appear on a video and contain the dialogue and cues to indicate sounds are occurring, such as music or sound effects. Subtitles are text that appear on a video or in a movie and typically contain only a translation of the dialogue.

    CaptionsThe purpose of captioning is to make a video accessible to those who cannot access the audio content, such as for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, and for other situations in which the audio cannot be heard due to environmental noise or a need for silence.

    Captions can be either open captions (always turned on, aka "burned in") or closed captions (can be turned on/off by the viewer). For TV broadcast, closed captions are much more common because they allow each viewer to decide whether they want the captions to be turned on or off. Closed captions are transmitted as a special coded signal sent along with the video picture, and require a decoder in your television or set top box to display the text on the screen. This special coded signal is what broadcasters check for to ensure that your video is in accordance with the law.

    For technical reasons, closed captions have many more rules and constraints that affect the timing and the appearance of the text. This means that in practical use, the caption author has limited or no ability to specify the font, size, text styling, and so on. These settings are determined by the decoder which renders the text to the screen when the captions are turned on.

    SubtitlesSubtitles are text that appears on a video or in a movie and typically contains only a translation of the dialogue, typically because the dialogue is in a foreign language, or because the dialogue was difficult to hear clearly. Unlike captions, subtitles usually do not convey non-dialogue sounds such as background noise, sound effects, or music cues, because it is presumed that the viewer is able to hear them. Subtitles have fewer rules and limitations than closed captions, and generally have more fonts, styles, and colors available to choose from.

    Subtitles can be burned into the video so they can't be turned off. This is called "open subtitles", "burn-in subtitles" or "hard subtitles," and is used when the subtitles must always be available, such as when translating foreign language dialogue for a general audience. This is also useful when working with a video format or player that doesn't support soft subtitles or closed captions.

    Some formats, such as DVD, Blu-ray, many web-based players, and a few other video formats, can contain one or more tracks of subtitles which can be selected and turned on or off by the player. This is called "soft subtitles" or "separate subtitles".

    Subtitle tracks which contain non-verbal audio cues and mimic the look and feel of closed captions are called "SDH" (Subtitles for the Deaf and Hard of hearing) tracks. SDH tracks are often used to emulate closed captions on formats that don't support closed captioning due to technical limitations, such as Blu-ray.

  • 15

    Installation

    The procedures in this chapter explain how to install and upgrade CaptionMaker and MacCaption.

    Note: The Demo versions of CaptionMaker or MacCaption can only run in trial mode. When you purchase a license, you must download and install a licensed version in order at activate CaptionMaker or MacCaption.

    The following topics are included:

    Installing and Activating CaptionMaker

    – Buying and Activating CaptionMaker– Activating CaptionMaker Offline– Upgrading CaptionMaker– Deactivating a CaptionMaker License

    Installing and Activating MacCaption

    – Buying and Activating MacCaption– Activating MacCaption Offline– Upgrading MacCaption– Deactivating Your MacCaption License

  • InstallationInstalling and Activating CaptionMaker

    16

    Installing and Activating CaptionMakerFollow these steps to install CaptionMaker:

    1. Download the CaptionMaker installer and run the setup program.

    2. Click Setup to start the CaptionMaker InstallShield Wizard. Follow the on-screen instructions in the installation dialogs.

    3. When asked if you want to install the HASP USB dongle drivers:

    a. Select Yes if you are using a USB dongle-based license.b. Select No if you will enter your serial number directly in the application.

    Click Finish to close the installer.

  • Installation Installing and Activating CaptionMaker

    17

    Buying and Activating CaptionMakerFollow these steps to buy a license and activate the software:

    1. After purchasing CaptionMaker, you will receive instructions to download the licensed (non-Demo) version of the software. You must install the licensed version of CaptionMaker in order to activate your license. See the previous section for instructions on installing CaptionMaker.

    2. Start the program for the first time by clicking on the CaptionMaker icon on your desktop. The first time the software runs, you will see the following message indicating CaptionMaker is running in DEMO mode.

    Note: To start the program, you can also go to the Start Menu, Telestream folder, and click CaptionMaker.

    3. Click OK to continue.

    4. Open the Help menu, and select Manage CaptionMaker License.

    5. In the Manage CaptionMaker License dialog, click Activate/Purchase.

  • InstallationInstalling and Activating CaptionMaker

    18

    6. Enter your serial number and click OK, or click Purchase if you have not already purchased the software.

    7. Click Activate License. If you have Internet access, activation will complete automatically. The Manage CaptionMaker License says, “CaptionMaker is registered.”

    8. Quit and restart CaptionMaker. Then go to Help > About CaptionMaker. Verify that the window reads CaptionMaker-Desktop, -Pro, or -Enterprise, matching the license you purchased (as shown below). You are now ready to use CaptionMaker.

  • Installation Installing and Activating CaptionMaker

    19

    Activating CaptionMaker OfflineIf you don’t have Internet access during license activation, an error message will appear (shown below). Click Retry if you are able to connect to the Internet. Canceling the error message allows you to activate a license manually, using a different computer that has Internet access.

    1. Click Cancel in the error message to continue manual license activation. The Product Activation dialog appears.

  • InstallationInstalling and Activating CaptionMaker

    20

    2. Select Activate using a different computer that has web access, and click Next. A new screen appears, providing you with an activation URL and an Installation ID.

    3. Using another computer or device that has Internet access, open the URL that was provided in the Product Activation dialog. The essellerate services page appears.

  • Installation Installing and Activating CaptionMaker

    21

    4. Enter the Installation ID and click Submit. An Activation Key is displayed.

    5. Enter the Activation Key on the CaptionMaker computer, as shown below, then click Activate.

    6. The screen indicates Success. Click Done to finish licensing CaptionMaker. Now when you restart CaptionMaker, the About window indicates the type of license you purchased (as explained in the last step of the previous section).

  • InstallationInstalling and Activating CaptionMaker

    22

    Upgrading CaptionMakerIf you need to use features that are in a higher level of the software, you can buy an upgrade.

    Note: If you are upgrading from a previous version and you work with external hardware, such as a caption encoder, VTR deck, or external time code interface, Telestream recommends that you write down your device configuration settings such as port, address, and so on, prior to upgrading, in case these settings need to be entered again.

    To upgrade, you can select Help > Purchase/Upgrade to go to the Telestream Online Store web page, or follow these steps to upgrade your license using Help > Manage CaptionMaker License:

    1. Open the Help menu, and select Manage CaptionMaker License.

    2. In the Manage CaptionMaker License dialog, click Upgrade.

    3. In the online store, select the license level you want to buy.

    4. Follow the on-screen prompts to purchase the upgrade. The procedure that follows explains how to activate the upgraded license.

    Activating a CaptionMaker UpgradeUsually the upgrade process will complete automatically, but in some cases you may receive the upgrade key via email. In that case you must deactivate your old key in order to enter the new key. To activate your upgraded license, follow these steps:

    1. Open the Help menu, and select Manage CaptionMaker License.

    2. Click Deactivate License. This requires an Internet connection.

  • Installation Installing and Activating CaptionMaker

    23

    3. Confirm that the screen shows The serial number is valid, but it is not activated.

    4. Click Edit Serial Number. A dialog box opens to allow serial number entry.

    5. Enter the new serial number, and click OK.

    6. Click Activate License.

    7. Confirm that the screen shows CaptionMaker is registered and shows the upgraded license level.

  • InstallationInstalling and Activating CaptionMaker

    24

    Deactivating a CaptionMaker LicenseIf you want to move the CaptionMaker license to another computer, you must first deactivate it on the current computer. This action requires Internet access. Follow these steps:

    1. Open the Help menu, and click Manage CaptionMaker License. A dialog opens indicating that the product is registered and allowing you to deactivate the license.

    2. Click Deactivate License.

    3. Confirm that the screen shows The serial number is valid, but it is not activated.

    4. After waiting 15 minutes for the server to update your license status, you can activate this serial number on another computer where you have installed CaptionMaker or MacCaption.

  • Installation Installing and Activating MacCaption

    25

    Installing and Activating MacCaptionFollow these steps to install MacCaption:

    1. Download the Desktop, Pro, or Enterprise licensed version (depending on what you purchased) of the MacCaption installer and open the disk image.

    2. Double-click the installer package to open it. The installer displays a Welcome screen and important information. Click Continue. Follow the on-screen instructions in the installation dialogs.

    The installation continues, and at completion, a window opens to indicate success. Click Close to complete the installation.

  • InstallationInstalling and Activating MacCaption

    26

    Buying and Activating MacCaptionBuy and activate a MacCaption license as follows:

    1. After purchasing MacCaption, you will receive instructions to download the licensed (non-Demo) version of the software. You must install the licensed version of MacCaption in order to activate your license. See the previous section for instructions on installing MacCaption.

    2. To run MacCaption, find the MacCaption icon in your Applications folder, and double click it.

    The first time the software runs, if you have not already activated it on this com-puter, you will be running in demo mode and many restrictions will apply.

    3. Open the Help menu, and select Manage MacCaption License.

    The MacCaption License dialog opens, indicating the software is not yet activated.

    3. Click the lock icon and enter your Mac user name and password to authenticate your user account. Then return to the MacCaption License window.

  • Installation Installing and Activating MacCaption

    27

    4. If you already have a serial number, click Enter Serial Number and type in your serial number. If not, click on Purchase License and follow the on-screen instructions to purchase a license online. After entering your serial number, you can choose whether to Upgrade or Activate your serial number.

    5. Click Activate Serial Number. Next, you’ll be asked to confirm your serial number.

    6. Confirm your serial number, and click Activate. Activation will complete automatically and MacCaption will say "MacCaption (Version): Activated."

    (Note: If you don’t have Internet access, you can activate using a different com-puter that has Web access. See Activating MacCaption Offline.)

    7. Click OK, and then quit and restart the MacCaption software.

    8. Go to MacCaption > About MacCaption, and verify that you are running the proper license type (for example, Desktop, Pro, or Enterprise).

    9. Click OK. MacCaption is now installed and ready to use.

  • InstallationInstalling and Activating MacCaption

    28

    Activating MacCaption OfflineIf you don’t have Internet access from the MacCaption computer, you can activate MacCaption using a different Internet-connected computer. Follow these steps:

    1. After starting the Activate Serial Number process described in the previous procedure, make the following selection: Activate using a different computer that has web access and click Next.

    2. Using the Internet-connected computer, access the URL that is presented on the MacCaption computer.

    3. On the eSellerate activation website, enter the Installation ID that MacCaption provided, and click Submit.

  • Installation Installing and Activating MacCaption

    29

    Esellerate displays your new activation key at the bottom of the page. You can also enter your email address to receive a copy of your activation key by email.

  • InstallationInstalling and Activating MacCaption

    30

    4. Enter the Activation Key into the MacCaption Product Activation dialog, and click Activate. If the key is entered correctly, a message saying “Success” should be displayed.

    5. Click Done to finish the activation process. MacCaption should now say “MacCaption (version) Activated.”

    6. Quit and restart MacCaption. Then go to MacCaption > About MacCaption, and verify that you are running the proper license type (for example, Desktop, Pro, or Enterprise).

  • Installation Installing and Activating MacCaption

    31

    Upgrading MacCaptionIf you need to use features that are in a higher level of the software, you can purchase an upgrade.

    Note: If you are upgrading from a previous version and you work with external hardware, such as a caption encoder, VTR deck, or external time code interface, Telestream recommends that you write down your device configuration settings such as port, address, and so on, prior to upgrading, in case these settings need to be entered again.

    1. Open the Help menu and select Manage MacCaption License. The MacCaption License window opens.

    2. Click the lock icon to authenticate your Mac account.

    3. Enter your Mac user name and password when prompted.

    4. Click Upgrade License.

    5. The MacCaption online store window will open. Follow the on-screen prompts to select and purchase your upgrade.

  • InstallationInstalling and Activating MacCaption

    32

    Activating a MacCaption UpgradeUsually the upgrade process will complete automatically, but in some cases you may receive the upgrade key via email. In that case you must deactivate your old key in order to enter the new key. To activate your upgraded license, follow these steps:

    1. Open the MacCaption Help menu, and select Manage MacCaption Activation. The MacCaption License window opens.

    2. Click the lock icon, and enter your Mac user name and password to authenticate your Mac user account. The lock unlocks and the license options are enabled.

    3. Click on Deactivate Serial Number. This step requires Internet access.

    4. After deactivation, MacCaption will automatically exit. Start the software again. It will start in Demo mode.

    5. Open the Help menu, and select Manage MacCaption Activation.

  • Installation Installing and Activating MacCaption

    33

    6. Click the lock icon, and enter your Mac user name and password to authenticate your Mac user account. The license options are displayed again.

    7. Click Activate Serial Number. The Serial Number entry form opens.

    8. Enter the new upgrade serial number that was emailed to you, and click Activate.

    9. Confirm that the screen now shows "MacCaption (Version): Activated" and displays the upgraded license level.

    10. Click OK. Then quit and restart MacCaption.

  • InstallationInstalling and Activating MacCaption

    34

    Deactivating Your MacCaption LicenseIf you want to move the MacCaption license to another computer, you must first deactivate it on the current computer. This action requires Internet access. Follow these steps:

    1. Go to the MacCaption Help menu and select Manage MacCaption Activation. The MacCaption License window opens.

    2. Click the lock icon and enter your Mac user name and password to authenticate your Mac account.

    3. Click on Deactivate Serial Number.

    4. Confirm that the screen shows "MacCaption (Version): Not Activated"

    5. After waiting 15 minutes for the server to update your license status, you can activate this serial number on another computer where you have installed CaptionMaker or MacCaption.

  • 35

    Quick Start

    This chapter provides an introduction to CaptionMaker and MacCaption features and operation.

    The following topics are covered in this chapter:

    Introduction to CaptionMaker

    Introduction to MacCaption

    Exporting Your Finished Project

    Introduction to CaptionMakerThe following topics describe some basic operations in CaptionMaker.

    For complete instructions and information see the CaptionMaker User Guide. This is available from Help > User Guide (Local), and from the Telestream web site.

    Importing Text FilesCaptionMaker can import plain ASCII text, MS Word, or an RTF file. Follow these steps to import a text file to use as your captions:

    1. Click on File on the top menu bar, and then select Import, or drag and drop a text file from Windows Explorer into the CaptionMaker text area.

    2. Under File Type, select Text Documents, and then select the type of document.

  • Quick StartIntroduction to CaptionMaker

    36

    3. Click Browse, and select your caption text file.

    4. Click Next, and make sure that the Free Form option is selected.

    5. Click Next again, and select the Options for how to break up the text into caption-sized pieces. We recommend the default settings for most captioning projects. The maximum number of characters for each line should be from 26 to 32 characters.

    6. Select Display Mode for text, such as Pop-On, Paint-on, Roll-up, and so on.

    Note: For most post-production captioning projects, we recommend using the Pop-on mode. Roll-up captions are typically used for live captioning.

    7. Click Finish.

  • Quick Start Introduction to CaptionMaker

    37

    Opening a Movie in CaptionMakerCaptionMaker supports three technologies for playing video files: DirectX-DirectShow, QuickTime (if installed), and Microsoft Media Foundation (MMF). For more information on what types of video files can be played in CaptionMaker, please see the CaptionMaker User’s Guide.

    Note: Opening a movie only loads the video and its audio for playback. If the video contains closed captions, a separate import step is needed to bring in the captions: File > Import > Extract from Video > [select file type] > [select file].

    You can open a new movie, or replace the currently loaded movie. To open or replace a movie follow these steps:

    1. From the File menu choose Open Movie, or drag and drop a movie/video file into CaptionMaker’s Video Preview panel. The Video Properties dialog opens.

  • Quick StartIntroduction to CaptionMaker

    38

    2. A file type is automatically selected based on the file extension of the video you're opening, however you can choose a different option if you prefer. You can select one of the following playback options for the type of video file you are opening:

    a. DirectX DirectShow. The default for playing Windows Media (WMV and AVI) files.

    b. QuickTime. The default for playing QuickTime files such as MOV and also works well for MP4. QuickTime must be installed to use this option.

    c. Microsoft Media Foundation (MMF). For playing MP4 files if QuickTime is not installed.

    3. Click Browse and locate the video file that you want to import. (The file is already selected if you used the drag-drop method)

    4. Make any other desired adjustments, then click OK.

    The video appears in the CaptionMaker Video Preview panel.

    Formatting TextAfter you import the text document, the text will already be broken up into caption-sized pieces. However, you may want to format them to be more aesthetically pleasing, for example based on the recommendations in DCMP's Captioning Key guidelines.

    Each operation will apply to the currently selected caption row(s). To select more than one caption, click on the number of first caption you want to select (this number is on the left side of each caption), then, while holding the Shift key, click on the number of the last caption you want to select. You can also use the mouse to drag and select a range. Or, to select all the captions, click the column header at the top of the grid.

    1. The Left, Center, and Right Position buttons change the text horizontal positioning and the justification.

    2. To stylize the text, select the text and click the Underline or Italic buttons.

    3. To change the text color, highlight the text and select a color option from Text Color button on the Main toolbar (the A with a color ribbon below it).

    Note: It is not recommended to use bold formatting for captions since in most TV display situations the text will flash.

    4. To move the text to the top or bottom of the screen, click on the Top or Bottom buttons in the toolbar. To fine control the vertical position, right click on the vertical (V) column in the grid and select the position.

    5. The Push Last Word and Pull First Word buttons (up and down arrows) allow you to quickly move text a word at a time between caption rows.

  • Quick Start Introduction to CaptionMaker

    39

    6. The Expand and Compress Text Block buttons allow you to adjust the width of the lines. These perform a word wrap to increase or decrease the number of caption lines, ranging from 1-4 lines. It is recommended to have 1-2 lines for most captions.

    7. The Alternate Break Formatting button will change where the line breaks occur. It is better to make the text bottom heavy (shorter lines towards the top, longer lines towards the bottom.)

    8. To change the Display Mode, select a row, or multiple rows, and right click in the Display column of a highlighted row and select a display mode. To change the Display Mode for all captions, click Display in the column header to select all rows, then right click to select the mode. (Pop-on is recommended for most captions.)

    9. To insert a music symbol, open the Attribute menu > Insert Music Symbol(s) > Single Music Symbol, or Surrounding Music Symbols. Press Control+M for the single music symbol.

    10. To change text to all Upper, Lower, or Sentence Case, go to Format > Upper/Lower case.

    11. You can find a word in the text, or replace occurrences of a given text, using the menus Edit > Find…, and Edit > Replace…

    Row OperationsThe Row Operations tools provide a quick way to insert, delete, merge, split, and select rows.

    Insert Row(s). Create a new blank row before the currently selected row. When you have multiple rows selected it inserts that number of rows.

    Delete Row(s). Delete the currently selected row(s).

    Merge Rows. Combine two selected rows into one row.

    Split Row. Splits the current row at the position of the text cursor.

    Select Row. Click to open the Select Caption/Subtitle Record dialog. Type the row you want to go to and click OK.

  • Quick StartIntroduction to CaptionMaker

    40

    Synchronizing Captions (Time Stamping) When ready to synchronize the text with the video, in many cases you can simply use the Auto Time Stamp feature by going to the menu Time Code > Auto Time Stamp.

    Manual Time StampingManual time stamping is needed in some cases, such as videos that are not in English or that have loud music. Manual time stamping allows you to associate a time code to each block of text so it will be in sync with the dialog.

    To perform manual time stamping:

    1. Rewind the video all of the way to the beginning by dragging the slider, that’s just below the video, all of the way to the left.

    2. Click the Time Stamp button . Playback starts, but the captions do not play along.

    3. Click the Send Caption, or In Point button each time you hear the first word of a caption. Or you can press the + key on your extended keyboard number pad.

    4. Every time you press the + key, or the In Point button, time code appears in Start for that row and the next row is automatically selected. Continue until you have set the start time for each row of captions.

    5. To stop video playback, press the Play/Pause button .

    Checking the TimingAfter running ATS, or after manual time stamping, you are ready to check the timing of the captions by using Preview Play. At the same time you can check the location of the captions to see if position adjustments are needed. Each caption should start when the first word of the caption is spoken.

    Preview PlayTo preview the caption and video synchronization:

    1. Rewind the video all of the way to the beginning by dragging the slider, that’s just below the video, all of the way to the left.

    2. Press the Preview Play button . This engages the Auto Row button which makes the captions change with the video, following the Start and Stop times that are set.

    3. To stop the video, press the Play/Pause button .

    4. You can now use the Play/Pause button to start and stop the video and the captions will stay synchronized since the Auto Row button is engaged.

    Now that you've put together a project, you need to export the project. Refer to Exporting Your Finished Project later in this guide.

  • Quick Start Introduction to CaptionMaker

    41

    Caption and Video Playback Controls in CaptionMaker

    Pointer and handle to time location

    Rewind. Press to put the video into rewind mode.

    Step Back. Press to go back one frame. Hold Shift and press to go back about 1/3 of a second. Hold Control and press to go back about 1 second.

    Play/Pause. Press to play and pause the video.

    Step Forward. Press to go forward one frame. Hold Shift and press to go forward about 1/3 of a second. Hold Control and press to go forward about 1 second.

    Fast Forward. Press to put the video into fast forward mode.

    Preview Play. Press to start playback and engage the Auto Row button . This makes the captions change along with the video, following the Start and Stop times that are set.

    Time Stamp. This button starts video playback, but the captions do not play along. Use this mode when you want to edit the In points (start times) of the captions and you don’t want the captions to advance.

    Auto Row (Captions Follow Video). When this is pressed (toggled on), the captions change along with the video, following the Start and Stop times that are set.

    Auto Shuttle (Video Follows Captions). When this is pressed (toggled on), and you select a caption row, the video automatically jumps to the time of that caption. You can also quickly move through the caption rows using the up and down arrow keys, and the video follows along.

  • Quick StartIntroduction to MacCaption

    42

    Introduction to MacCaptionThe following topics describe some basic operations in MacCaption.

    Importing Text Files1. Make sure that your text is saved as plain text or as a script file. If it is not, this can be

    done easily in the TextEdit program on your Mac.

    2. Go to File > Import > Plain Text File and select a file to open, or drag and drop the text file onto the right side text area in MacCaption. The Text Import Options dialog opens.

    3. You can select various options for how the text is automatically broken up into caption sized pieces. The maximum number of characters for each line should be 26. For most captioning projects we recommend the settings shown in the following Text Import Options dialog:

  • Quick Start Introduction to MacCaption

    43

    Opening a Movie in MacCaptionMacCaption can play videos that are compatible with your QuickTime player. If you need to play videos that are not playable by default with QuickTime, you may be able to add a plug-in or install an additional codec in your system. If you have a file type that cannot be played in MacCaption, you can create a proxy movie.

    Note: Opening a movie only opens the video and audio for playback. If the video contains closed captions, a separate import step is needed to bring in the captions (File > Import > Extract CC from Media > [select format] > [select file]).

    To open or replace a movie:

    1. Your video must be QuickTime 7 compatible, .mov, .mp3, .mp4, .avi, or any format that can be played by the QuickTime Player 7 using plug-ins. For more info on what types of video files can be played in MacCaption, please see the Telestream support site.

    2. Go to File > Open Movie, or drag and drop that video file into the video preview area. Your video will appear in the preview panel. When a movie is currently loaded, the new movie will replace it.

    Formatting TextAfter you import the text document, the text will already be broken up into caption-sized pieces. However, you may want to format them to be more aesthetically pleasing. As a reference, formatting recommendations are provided in DCMP's Captioning Key guidelines.

    Each operation will apply to the currently selected text row(s). To select more than one row, click on the number of first row you want to select (this number is on the left side of each caption), then, while holding the Shift key, click on the number of the last caption you want to select. Or, to select all the captions, use the menu Edit > Select All, or press Cmd-A.

  • Quick StartIntroduction to MacCaption

    44

    In the above screenshot, captions 2 through 4 are selected (highlighted), and will be affected by editing operations described below.

    1. The Left, Center, and Right Position buttons change the text horizontal positioning and the justification.

    2. To stylize the text, highlight the text and select Underline or Italic.

    3. To change the text color, highlight the text and select a color option from the menu Caption > Attributes > Text Color.

    Note: It is not recommended to use bold formatting for captions since in most TV display situations the text will flash.

    4. To move the text to the top or bottom of the screen, click the Move to Top or Move to Bottom buttons.

    5. To adjust the horizontal and vertical caption positioning (including split captions), you can click the cursor in the video area, then use the mouse or the keyboard arrow keys to move the captions around on the screen.

    6. The Push Word Down and Pull Word Up buttons (up and down arrows) allow you to quickly move text a word at a time between adjacent caption rows.

    7. The Compress Line Length and Expand Line Length buttons allow you to adjust the width of the lines, which can word wrap to increase or decrease the number of caption lines, ranging from 1-4 lines. We recommend 1-2 lines for most captions.

    8. The Alternate Break button will change where the line breaks occur. It is better to make the text bottom heavy (shorter lines towards the top, longer lines towards the bottom.)

    9. To change the Display Mode, select a row, or multiple rows, then select the Display Mode menu to select the display option. (Pop-on is recommended for most captions.)

    10. To insert a music symbol, go to Format > Insert Music Symbol(s) > Single Music Symbol, or Surrounding Music Symbols, or press Command+M for the Single Music Symbol.

    11. To change text to all Upper, Lower, or Sentence Case, go to Format > Upper and Lower case.

    12. You can find a word in the text, or replace occurrences of a given text, using the menu Edit > Find .

  • Quick Start Introduction to MacCaption

    45

    Row OperationsThe Row operations tools provide a quick way to insert, delete, split, and merge rows.

    Insert Caption Row. Create a new blank row above the currently selected row. When you have multiple rows selected it inserts that number of rows.

    Delete Caption(s). Delete the currently selected caption row(s).

    Split Caption. Splits the current row at the position of the text cursor and places the text after the cursor in a new row. You can also press the Return key to split the row at the cursor position. When the cursor is at the end of the text and you press the Return key a blank row is inserted after the current row.

    Merge Caption. Combine the row below and the current selection into one row.

    Synchronizing Captions (Time Stamping)When ready to synchronize the text with the video, in many cases you can simply use the Auto Time Stamp feature by going to the menu Time Code > Auto Time Stamp.

    Manual Time StampingManual time stamping is needed in some cases, such as videos that are not in English or that have loud music. Manual time stamping allows you to associate a time code to each block of text so it will be in sync with the dialog.

    To perform manual time stamping:

    1. Rewind the video all of the way to the beginning by dragging the slider, that’s just below the video, all of the way to the left.

    2. Click the Time Stamp button . Playback starts, but the captions do not play along.

    3. Click the Mark In button each time you hear the first word of a caption. Or you can press the Option-Command-M shortcut keys.

    4. Every time you press the Mark In button, time code appears in Starting Time for that row and the next row is automatically selected. Continue until you have set the start time for each row of captions.

    5. To stop video playback, press the Play/Pause button .

    Checking the TimingAfter running Auto Time Stamp, or after manual time stamping, you are ready to check the timing of the captions by using Preview Play. At the same time you can check the location of the captions to see if position adjustments are needed. For proper timing, each caption should start when the first word of the caption is spoken.

  • Quick StartIntroduction to MacCaption

    46

    Preview PlayTo preview the caption and video synchronization:

    1. Rewind the video all of the way to the beginning by dragging the slider, that’s just below the video, all of the way to the left.

    2. Press the Preview Play button . This engages the Captions Follow Video button which makes the captions change with the video, following the Start and End

    times that are set for each caption.

    3. To stop the video, press the Play/Pause button .

    4. You can now use the Play/Pause button to start and stop the video and the captions will stay synchronized since the Captions Follow Video button is engaged.

    Now that you've put together a project, you need to export the project. Refer to Exporting Your Finished Project.

  • Quick Start Introduction to MacCaption

    47

    Caption and Video Playback Controls in MacCaption Pointer and handle to time location

    Rewind. Press to put the video into rewind mode. Press multiple times to incrementally increase the speed.

    Frame Step Reverse. Press to go back one frame. Hold Shift and press to go back 10 frames (about 1/3 of a second at 30 fps), Option for 30 frames (about 1 second at 30 fps), and Control for 300 frames (about 10 seconds at 30 fps).

    For an example of different frame rates, holding the Option key (moving 30 frames) would be about 1.25 seconds for 24 fps, about 1 second for 29.97 fps, and about 0.5 second for a 59.98 fps movie.

    Play/Pause. Press to play and pause the video. You can also press the Space bar.

    Frame Step Forward. Press to go forward one frame. Hold Shift and press to go forward 10 frames (about 1/3 of a second at 30 fps), Option for 30 frames (about 1 second at 30 fps), and Control for 300 frames (about 10 seconds at 30 fps).

    For an example of different frame rates, holding the Option key (moving 30 frames) would be about 1.25 seconds for 24 fps, about 1 second for 29.97 fps, and about 0.5 second for a 59.98 fps movie.

    Fast Forward. Press to put the video into fast forward mode. Press multiple times to incrementally increase the speed.

    Preview Play. Press to start playback and engage the Captions Follow Video button . This makes the captions change along with the video, following the Start and End times that are set. Use this to preview captions after they have been synchronized to the video.

    Time Stamp. This button starts video playback, but the captions do not play along. Use this mode when you want to edit the In points (start times) of the captions with new timing by pressing the Mark In button and you don’t want the captions to advance using the existing timing.

    Captions Follow Video. When this is pressed (toggled on), the captions change along with the video, following the Start and End times that are set.

    Video Follows Captions. When this is pressed (toggled on), and you select a caption row, the video automatically jumps to the time of that caption. You can also quickly move through the caption rows using the up and down arrow keys, and the video follows along.

  • Quick StartIntroduction to MacCaption

    48

    J-K-L Playback ControlYou can use the J-K-L keyboard controls to shuttle the video, the same way that popular video editing applications operate.

    To use the J-K-L keyboard control, press J to rewind, K to stop, and L to play forward. Multiple presses of the J or L keys increases the speed of rewind or forward.

  • Quick Start Exporting Your Finished Project

    49

    Exporting Your Finished ProjectThis section briefly explores some of the export functions of CaptionMaker and MacCaption. It is important to note that not all versions of CaptionMaker and MacCaption have the same exporting capabilities. See Table 1 in this document for a side-by-side comparison of all the features at a glance.

    Both CaptionMaker and MacCaption have a variety of export options, including formats for web and mobile video, DVD/Blu-ray, Web, broadcast video formats for SD, HD, UHD, 4K and so on. Depending on which version of the software you purchase, different features are available.

    Exporting Standalone Caption FilesMany types of caption files are standalone, meaning the captions are in a separate file and not embedded into the video file. There are many different types of standalone caption files:

    • For use on the web, such as Timed Text, WebVTT, and SRT (.srt) files. The type depends on the player being using on the web.

    • Some are used in broadcast workflows, such as SCC (.scc) and MCC (.mcc). (SCC is also used for DVD closed captioning.)

    • Some are used for working with an NLE system, such as Final Cut Pro, Avid, and Adobe Premiere Pro.

    • Some are used for interchange with other captioners or captioning software, such as Cheetah, CAP, TDS, Ultech ULT, and so on.

    Embedding Captions into VideoCaptions embedded in video are typically used for broadcast video files such as ProRes, MPEG-2, and MXF. The captions are embedded directly into the video file instead of being saved to a separate file. CaptionMaker and MacCaption do not convert one type of video to another. This conversion is called transcoding and can be done in other Telestream software such as Episode or Vantage. If you want to output, for example, an MPEG-2 file with embedded captions, you must provide an MPEG-2 video file in the desired format, and then CaptionMaker and MacCaption can embed captions into it.

    File-based Delivery for Broadcast TVTV stations used to receive shows on tape, but most stations now use digital video files instead. Just as there were many different tape formats back in the day, such as BetaSP, DV, HDCAM, and so on, there are many different file formats that can be used for file-based delivery, such as QuickTime, MPEG-2, and MXF. Most formats support closed captions in one way or another, but each workflow is slightly different. It also depends on what the TV station is using to play back the file.

  • Quick StartExporting Your Finished Project

    50

    For example, many video servers installed at TV stations support playing back QuickTime video files, but this does not guarantee that they support the closed captions in QuickTime video files. Even if the captions seem to work on your end (such as playing them in QuickTime Player), this doesn't mean that the TV station can see the captions when played back on their server.

    There are actually several different types of captions that can be inserted into QuickTime files. Your station might accept all of them (if they use Telestream Vantage, for example), or only some of them, or maybe even none of them. You might have to use a different type of video file other than QuickTime, such as MPEG-2 or MXF, to ensure that they can read the captions.

    Get the TV Station Spec SheetIt is best to ask your TV station for a "spec sheet" and confirm with its engineers that the format you're using works for them. Make sure the spec sheet mentions specific types of captions that they support. Saying "QuickTime File" or "MPEG-2 file" isn't always sufficient, because there are many different types of captions that can be inserted into QuickTime files and MPEG-2 files.

    Get a Sample Captioned Video FileIf the TV station can't provide you a spec sheet, ask them for a sample file that contains closed captions which work for them. You can then examine the file to determine what types of captions are known to work.

    Use Switch to Perform a TestIt is always a good idea to send the station a short captioned sample video and ensure that they can read the captions from your sample before proceeding with the full delivery.

    We recommend using Telestream Switch to check that your video has captions, before sending to the station. Get it at http://www.telestream.net/switch/overview.htm

    Overview of TV FormatsHere is an overview of the types of captions that can be used for broadcast TV files:

    • Captions embedded into the video file:

    – Closed Captioning track. An extra track of closed captions is added to the file. This is most often used with QuickTime files (QuickTime CC track) and MXF files (SMPTE 436m VANC track). However, not every server that can play QuickTime or MXF files is able to read this closed captioning track.

    – User data captions. Captions are added as metadata into the contents of the file. This is often used with MPEG-2 (ATSC DTV 608/708 captions), and

    http://www.telestream.net/switch/overview.htmhttp://www.telestream.net/switch/overview.htm

  • Quick Start Exporting Your Finished Project

    51

    occasionally with H.264 video (NAL SEI 608/708 captions), or DV video for standard definition (DV VAUX captions).

    – Line 21 VBI. This is used for standard definition video only. The VBI line 21 "Morse Code" dots-and-dashes are embedded into the top line of the video. The video resolution must be 720x486 for most QuickTime and AVI formats (rather than 720x480, which excludes the extra 6 lines of VBI where the captions go), or sometimes 720x512 for certain MPEG-2 formats.

    • Sidecar caption file - a standalone file containing just the captions:

    – SCC files are commonly used, but they contain 608 (analog) captions only. Make sure the station has a system that can upconvert this data into CEA-708 digital captions, such as using Telestream Vantage.

    – MCC files are a next-generation improvement on SCC files, and contain native CEA-708 digital captions. They are supported by Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 and later, Blackmagic Hyperdeck, Manzanita muxers, Harris Nexio, and some other systems.

    – If the station uses Avid systems, they may want an Avid AAF caption track file.– Rarely, a station might ask you for a different type of caption interchange file,

    such as Cheetah .CAP, TDS, and so on.

    – If the video will be shown on the internet, you may be asked to provide a web format caption file, such as SMPTE Timed Text (TTML), DFXP, WebVTT, and so on.

    Next Steps for Delivery to the TV StationOnce you have confirmed with a TV station what kinds of video files they can accept with captions, you need to export that type. Keep in mind that MacCaption is not transcoding software - that is, it does not convert one type of video file into another.

    If you're editing your video in NLE software, you may be able to export directly to the format you need (without captions), but not every NLE can export to every format. If you're starting with a QuickTime file and need to deliver a MPEG-2 file, you need to do some steps outside of the captioning software to create the MPEG-2 file first. Only then can MacCaption insert the captions into the MPEG-2 file.

    For transcoding, we recommend Telestream Episode or Vantage software. Make sure you select the right bit rate and other specifications as required by the TV station.

    Tape Delivery for Broadcast TVSome TV stations still rely on tape formats for their receivables. MacCaption can be used together with your NLE system, such as Adobe Premiere, Avid, or Final Cut Pro, and a tape deck such as DV, BetaSP, or HDCAM to deliver a closed captioned video tape to the TV station.

    Note that the following descriptions only apply when outputting to a tape deck via your capture card. These instructions do not apply when exporting a video file from your NLE system. For more information on file-based workflows for TV please refer to the previous section.

  • Quick StartExporting Your Finished Project

    52

    Adobe PremierePremiere versions CS 5.5 or later can use an MCC file to output HD digital captions via your capture card (such as AJA, Blackmagic, Matrox, and so on) to a tape deck, or a SCC file to output SD analog captions via your capture card or DV digital video via Firewire.

    Avid Media ComposerMedia Composer version 5 or later can use an Avid AAF file to output HD digital captions via your Mojo DX or Nitris DX hardware. For SD analog output, you can use the 720x486 line 21 overlay workflow.

    Final Cut ProFinal Cut Pro version 7 can use a QuickTime CC track to output HD digital or SD analog captions via your capture card such as AJA, Blackmagic, or Matrox, or DV via Firewire.

    OtherMost other NLEs that output SD analog video can use the 720x486 line 21 overlay workflow.

    For more information on tape based workflows and how to check your captions after outputting to tape, please refer to the Telestream knowledgebase via the support web page.

    Subtitle FilesThere are several ways you can export subtitles:

    • Burn-in. This permanently combines the subtitles and the video. They can't be turned off, but you never have to worry about whether they will work or not.

    • Overlay for Later Burn-in. If you're working with a video editor that wants to burn-in the subtitles, you can send them an overlay file. They put the overlay into their NLE system and render the burn-in video from there. That way, the captioner doesn't need the full resolution master video from the editor.

    • DVD/Blu-ray. Several prosumer and professional software packages for authoring DVD and Blu-ray discs can accept subtitle files. In this case the viewer can turn the subtitle tracks on or off. The type of file to export depends on which authoring soft-ware is being used to author the DVD or Blu-ray.

  • Quick Start Exporting Your Finished Project

    53

    Captioning for the Web and Mobile DevicesFor web video, there are a number of different standards and types of video playback mechanisms: Flash, Silverlight, HTML5, QuickTime, HLS, HDS, MS Smooth Streaming, MPEG DASH, UltraViolet, and so on. To support a broad variety of different playback devices a provider may need to stream the video in multiple formats, because there is no single video format that is supported by every device. You may need to export the related captions into more than one of these formats.

    Many mobile devices already support closed captions, although they require the captions in different formats depending on the device. With Telestream software it is easy to create captioned videos that work on multiple devices.

    The iPhone and iPad are very common players for portable video and music media. The Apple devices support TV-style closed captioning in H.264 video files. Most Android-based phones which support Flash can display Flash closed captions.

    For additional information on captioning for the web and mobile devices, see the Telestream Knowledge Base on the Captioning Support page of the Telestream web site.

    Post-Production (VOD) Web CaptioningCaptionMaker and MacCaption support a large number of formats for captioning video files for video on demand (VOD) on the web, including:

    • SMPTE Timed Text (SMPTE 2052): A new standard for captioning for both broadcast and the web, also for UltraViolet (DECE CFF format).

    • WebVTT: Another new standard for captioning and subtitling web videos, fre-quently used with HTML5 and Apple HLS streaming.

    • H.264 SEI Embedded CEA-608/708 Captions: Used for Akamai and Wowza VOD streaming, and other systems that support embedded 608/708 captions inside the video stream.

    • DFXP (TTML): Used by many Flash players and providers such as Brightcove, Lime-light, Flowplayer, JW Player, and so on.

    • iTunes Timed Text (iTT): Used for delivery to iTunes.

    • SRT: Supported by many Flash players and also YouTube, however this format does not carry any positioning or formatting information, just plain text and timing.

    • SCC: Supported by YouTube and some other web video players.

    • QuickTime Closed Captions Track: Apple devices and browsers can play closed cap-tion tracks embedded into QuickTime MOV and MP4 files, which mimics the look and feel of TV broadcast captions

    With the exception of QuickTime Closed Captions Track and H.264 SEI Embedded CEA-608/708 Captions, all of the other above formats are sidecar files, meaning the captions/subtitles are delivered as a separate file rather than being embedded into the video file.

    www.telestream.net/telestream-support/captioning/support.htm

  • Quick StartExporting Your Finished Project

    54

    DVD/Blu-rayYou need a DVD authoring system to author the DVD with closed captions and/or subtitles. Our software may be used in conjunction with a DVD authoring system to create the subtitle/caption files that your authoring system requires.

    DVD Closed CaptioningFor closed captioning a DVD, the file type used is a Scenarist .SCC closed captions file. Unfortunately, the Blu-ray specification does not support closed captioning. However, you can create an SDH subtitle track to mimic the look and feel of closed captioning.

    DVD/Blu-ray Subtitle FormatsThe subtitle file format depends on which DVD/Blu-ray authoring system you are using.

    SubtitlingUnlike closed captions which have a fixed look and feel (white text on black opaque rectangle background, with a fixed font and size), subtitles allow you to use most fonts, colors, sizes, and formats. Subtitles also support more languages, because unlike captions, you aren't limited to the Roman alphabet and certain accented characters.

    You can switch back and forth between caption and subtitle modes using Display > Display as Subtitles/Captions, or Command-D (for MacCaption) or using Subtitle menu and choosing a device such as Generic Subtitles (for CaptionMaker). A simple way to change modes is to use the Caption-Subtitle switch in CaptionMaker and MacCaption:

    Different captioning workflows are supported by different versions of CaptionMaker and MacCaption. See the Telestream captioning support page for details.

    Exporting SubtitlesThere are several ways you can export subtitles:

    • Burn-in. This permanently combines the subtitles and the video. They can't be turned off, but you never have to worry about whether they will work or not.

    • Overlay for Later Burn-in. If you're working with a video editor that wants to burn-in the subtitles, you can send them an overlay file. They put the overlay into their NLE system and render the burn-in video from there. That way, the captioner doesn't need the full resolution master video from the editor.

  • Quick Start Exporting Your Finished Project

    55

    • DVD/Blu-ray. Several prosumer and professional software packages for authoring DVD and Blu-ray discs can accept subtitle files. In this case the viewer can turn the subtitle tracks on or off. The type of file to export depends on which authoring soft-ware is being used to author the DVD or Blu-ray.

    Playing or Converting Captioned Video FilesThe Telestream tools, Episode and Switch, are great companions to CaptionMaker and MacCaption to provide the complete workflow of tools to create, edit, encode, and verify caption data in professional file formats for TV and the Internet.

    As of version 6.5, Episode provides many caption encoding and transcoding features for various file types, such as MCC and MPEG-2 CEA-608 and CEA-708 data, MXF for SMPTE 436M, and more.

    Note: CaptionMaker and MacCaption do not convert, or transcode, one type of input media file to a different type of output media file. However, they can convert caption/subtitle files to many different types. Episode or Vantage are great tools to convert one media file type to one or more other media file types.

    As of version 1.6, Switch decodes and plays many types of caption and subtitle files, such as Internet WebVTT, iTT, and TTML; MXF and MPEG-2; SCC, MOV, DV, DVB, LXF, GXF, SMPTE-TT, SRT, EBU-STL and more.

    Note: Common video players such as VLC, Windows Media Player, QuickTime Player, Sony XDCAM Viewer, and so on, do NOT display most types of closed captions. So even if your video will play in one of these players, it may not show the captions.

    For more information and additional features of Episode and Switch, go to telestream.net.

    http://www.telestream.net

  • Quick StartExporting Your Finished Project

    56

    ContentsOverview 9Installation 15Quick Start 35

    OverviewIntroductionVideo Tutorials and SupportComparing Software VersionsPrerequisites for CaptioningTranscribing a VideoUsing a Video File

    Automatic Time Stamp (ATS)Requirements for ATSATS ResultsBest Practices for ATS

    Caption Style GuidelinesCaptions vs. SubtitlesCaptionsSubtitles

    InstallationInstalling and Activating CaptionMakerBuying and Activating CaptionMakerActivating CaptionMaker OfflineUpgrading CaptionMakerActivating a CaptionMaker Upgrade

    Deactivating a CaptionMaker License

    Installing and Activating MacCaptionBuying and Activating MacCaptionActivating MacCaption OfflineUpgrading MacCaptionActivating a MacCaption Upgrade

    Deactivating Your MacCaption License

    Quick StartIntroduction to CaptionMakerImporting Text FilesOpening a Movie in CaptionMakerFormatting TextRow OperationsSynchronizing Captions (Time Stamping)Manual Time Stamping

    Checking the TimingPreview Play

    Caption and Video Playback Controls in CaptionMaker

    Introduction to MacCaptionImporting Text FilesOpening a Movie in MacCaptionFormatting TextRow OperationsSynchronizing Captions (Time Stamping)Manual Time Stamping

    Checking the TimingPreview Play

    Caption and Video Playback Controls in MacCaptionJ-K-L Playback Control

    Exporting Your Finished ProjectExporting Standalone Caption FilesEmbedding Captions into VideoFile-based Delivery for Broadcast TVGet the TV Station Spec SheetGet a Sample Captioned Video FileUse Switch to Perform a TestOverview of TV FormatsNext Steps for Delivery to the TV Station

    Tape Delivery for Broadcast TVAdobe PremiereAvid Media ComposerFinal Cut ProOther

    Subtitle FilesCaptioning for the Web and Mobile DevicesPost-Production (VOD) Web Captioning

    DVD/Blu-rayDVD Closed CaptioningDVD/Blu-ray Subtitle Formats

    SubtitlingExporting Subtitles

    Playing or Converting Captioned Video Files