Canterbury Festival Schools’ Poetry Competition ??Canterbury Festival and Wise Words Festival Schools’ Poetry Competition 2015 1 Canterbury Festival Schools’ Poetry Competition Teaching Resources for Primary Schools This Year’s Theme ... Reveal the rhyming words, and let the children know that in this poem there are half-rhymes. This is when words nearly rhyme, but not quite.

Download Canterbury Festival Schools’ Poetry Competition  ??Canterbury Festival and Wise Words Festival Schools’ Poetry Competition 2015 1 Canterbury Festival Schools’ Poetry Competition Teaching Resources for Primary Schools This Year’s Theme ... Reveal the rhyming words, and let the children know that in this poem there are half-rhymes. This is when words nearly rhyme, but not quite.

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  • Canterbury Festival and Wise Words Festival Schools Poetry Competition 2015 1

    Canterbury Festival Schools Poetry Competition

    Teaching Resources for Primary Schools

    This Years Theme

    The theme of the 2015 Canterbury Festival Schools Poetry Competition is Re-Write the

    World. Encourage pupils to craft their own narratives of myths and legends, of origins, of

    adventure and of mystery. This is their chance to re-write the world as we currently know it.

    The following are just ideas and children shouldnt feel like they have to follow a certain

    format: the more imaginative, creative and original, the better!

    Re-Write the World Building a Narrative using Myths and Legends

    Exercise 1: Paul Perros Collection of Childrens Poems-

    Fabulous Features of Mythical Creatures

    1. Read the following Paul Perro poems out loud. Then get the children to complete the tasks below.

    A mythical creature

    Or fabulous beast

    Is one that does not

    Really exist.

    Dragon

    A dragon can breathe fire

    And what he likes to do most,

    Is use this remarkable talent

    To make himself plenty of toast.

    Mermaid

    Mermaids have got fishs tails

    They cannot walk at all.

    Theyre good at water polo

    But suck at basketball.

    Cyclops

    A Cyclops only has one eye,

    Which means he cannot wink.

    Every time he has a try

    It turns into a blink. ,

  • Canterbury Festival and Wise Words Festival Schools Poetry Competition 2015 2

    Medusa

    Medusas a grumpy woman

    Youd best leave her alone.

    Shes got snakes instead of hair

    And can turn you into stone.

    Centaur

    A centaur is half human, but

    Has four legs, like a horse.

    He doesnt say neigh,

    And he doesnt eat hay,

    But he loves sugar lumps, of course.

    Troll

    It isnt much fun being a troll

    Living under a bridge.

    He hasnt got a TV,

    A sofa, bath, or fridge.

    Kraken

    The kraken is a giant squid

    That lives under the sea.

    Sometimes when its hungry it has

    Fish and ships for tea.

    Hydra

    The hydras a giant snake with nine heads.

    Can you imagine that?

    And can you imagine how much it would cost,

    If every head needed a hat?

    ---

    2. A characteristic is a feature or quality belonging to a person e.g. big nose, long hair, friendly, mean. This could be a physical description or something about their personality. Write down

    five characteristics.

    3. Then, write an acrostic poem with a few characteristics of a mythical creature. E.g. Medusa, unicorn, Cyclops, dragon.

    Monstrous features

    Evil in her ways

    Deadly in her cave

    Unfriendly

    Snakes hiss on her head

    Always avoid her stare!

  • Canterbury Festival and Wise Words Festival Schools Poetry Competition 2015 3

    4. Pick a character from myths and legends, books, games or films, and make a timeline/plot out a day in their life. For example,

    Hercules wakes up.

    He has breakfast.

    Then he arm-wrestles with a giant squid.

    Next, he climbs a mountain.

    After, he has dinner.

    Next, he reads a book.

    Then, he goes to bed.

    5. Using this, write a poem about a day in their life. Include as much detail as you can, with lots of adjectives (describing words) and verbs (action words).

    6. Re-Writing Canterbury Re-imaginings of Canterbury Landmarks

    Show a small part of this clip (anywhere from 7 minutes onward) which is the street dance

    group Diversity performing an act about toys coming to life after dark:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RC8chXydTks.

    This is a great way of expressing this fun re-imagining! There are also movies and TV series with

    the idea of things coming to life (for example Toy Story, Night at the Museum, the paintings in

    Harry Potter, the animals in the Chronicles of Narnia and the shop mannequins in Doctor Who)

    and paintings and poetry, like the ones below.

    Source: Art by street artist Banksy. See here how he has cut the picture of the woman out and

    placed her on the frame, outside the scene which suggests that she has come to life!

  • Canterbury Festival and Wise Words Festival Schools Poetry Competition 2015 4

    Toys Alive

    by Shirlene Britstra

    At the end of the hall under the stair

    The toy boxsilentnear the old rocking chair.

    The children tucked in, kissed goodnight,

    Stories read, off with the light.

    Sshh! Whats that faint stirring out there

    At the end of the hall, near the old rocking chair?

    Something magical, alls not what it seems,

    Toys Alive? - perhaps its a dream!

    Sshh! The witching hour, clocks chime,

    Toys come out for play time!

    All through the night, so much fun,

    Then, once more quiet with the rising sun!

    Sshh!

    The Toys Playtime

    by Tony Mitton

    When we go to bed at the end of the day,

    Our toys wake up and start to play.

    They wait until were fast asleep,

    Then THEY come alive and out they creep.

    The ball goes bouncing. The doll does a dance.

    The little ponies preen and prance.

    The toy car roars across the room.

    The rocket starts to take off: ZOOM!

    The robot reads a picture book,

    Then teddy comes and takes a look.

    And all the time were sleeping tight,

    The toys are playing through the night.

    But when the sunlight warms our faces,

    The toys sit quietly in their places.

    They do not move. They make no noise.

    You dont fool us, you naughty toys!

    Task:

    What mysterious goings-on can you think of? This could be in your house, in school, or somewhere

    in the Canterbury District. For example the library, the Cathedral, the Beaney, Chaucer Tales

  • Canterbury Festival and Wise Words Festival Schools Poetry Competition 2015 5

    Museum, Whitefriars, or the Turner Contemporary. Brainstorm ideas about this.

    Children could use a spider diagram with one place in the centre, and their ideas around it or

    simply jot down ideas.

    Pick your favourite idea from this and use it to a write a short poem about a new local myth. What

    happens in this myth? If something comes alive, what do they do? Remember to use lots of

    adjectives (describing words). For example:

    A monster lived in Canterbury Cathedral.

    He had long black fur,

    big green eyes

    and hands as big as windows!

    Everyone thought he was fearsome

    and left him alone at night.

    But this was when he enjoyed

    playing with all the mice!

    7. Re-Write the World: Origin Stories

    Rudyard Kiplings Just So Stories described the origins of animal characteristics, documenting the

    way the leopard got its spots, and how the whale got its throat, to name just a few.

    Read the following poem by Michael Rosen, which describes the origins of broccoli:

    Where Broccoli Comes From

    Not many people know

    that broccoli grows in the armpits

    of very big green men

    who live in the forest

    and brave broccoli cutters

    go deep into the forests

    and they creep up on the

    very big green men.

    They wait for the

    very big green men

    to fall asleep

    and the broccoli cutters

    get out their

    great big broccoli razors

    and they shave the

    armpits

    of the very big green men.

  • Canterbury Festival and Wise Words Festival Schools Poetry Competition 2015 6

    And thats where broccoli

    comes from.

    Not many people know that.

    Just thought Id let you know.

    Also read Perros moon poem as a source.

    Now, using the dice activity, lets create a poem about where things come from. The kookier the

    better!

    Dice activity:

    - Get pupils to list some items/places e.g. socks, bananas, hats and number the items from 1 - 6

    - Then list some creative ideas about where something comes from e.g. dungeons, secret caves,

    space, Mars, under the sea., and number this list also from 1 - 6

    - Roll a dice and the number you roll corresponds with an item from the first list.

    - Roll again! This number corresponds to an origin on the second list.

    - Now write an origin poem where the item you have been allocated comes from the location you

    have picked! For example, a pupil could get socks and Mars, and would then have to write a poem

    about how socks grew on Mars and were beamed down to Earth by aliens!

    Moon Landing

    by Paul Perro

    Once upon a time, years ago,

    There were two boys called Neil and Buzz.

    They were having an argument

    And this is what it was.

    "I think the moon's a giant face"

    Said Neil. "Everybody agrees."

    But Buzz said "No, Everyone knows

    The moon is made of cheese!"

    They argued on, "I'm right!" said Buzz

    But Neil said "No you're not, I am!"

    Eventually they decided

    To ask their Uncle Sam.

    So old uncle Sam listened to

    The two young boys argue and shout,

    And he said "My boys you must go

    Up to the moon and find out!"

    And old Uncle Sam decided

    That he would help them, so,

    He built the boys a rocket ship

    And called it Apollo.

  • Canterbury Festival and Wise Words Festival Schools Poetry Competition 2015 7

    The boys climbed into the rocket

    And they turned on the ignition.

    "Three, two, one,...blast-off!" they were off

    On their lunar mission.

    Up they went high into the sky

    Up higher, and higher, and soon

    They'd left the earth far far behind

    And landed on the moon.

    The boys climbed down from the rocket,

    But the stairs were really quite steep.

    Perhaps a small step for a man,

    For boys, a giant leap.

    Once on the moon they discovered

    It was a cold and rocky place.

    It was not made from cheese, and it

    Was not a giant face.

    "Well" said Buzz, quite disappointed,

    "This is not a fun place at all.

    I wish there was a cinema,

    Golf course, or shopping mall."

    They had a good look round the moon,

    And took lots of photographs too.

    They put up a flag, but then they

    Ran out of things to do.

    "I want to go back home" said Buzz,

    And nodding, Neil said so did he.

    They got back in Apollo and

    Turned the ignition key.

    The rocket took them back to Earth

    A bit like in an aeroplane.

    Space travel had been fun but they

    Were glad to be home again.

    9. Rhyming task. Not all poems need to rhyme, but this is a good way to write poems that are fun to read out loud.

    Get the children to get their pencils and paper ready, and ask them to make a note on which

    words they can hear that rhyme as you read the following poem out loud to them. Stress the

    words in bold as these are words which rhyme. Included in this are half-rhymes too (see

  • Canterbury Festival and Wise Words Festival Schools Poetry Competition 2015 8

    below for explanation)! You may decide that it is easier to ask your class to put up their

    hands when they hear a rhyme instead of writing it down.

    Clever Greeks by Paul Perro

    The Ancient Greeks invented many things,

    Like water mills, steam engines, and maps.

    They founded democracy,

    Drama and philosophy,

    The Ancient Greeks were really clever chaps.

    Astronomers from Greece worked out

    The Earth goes round the sun.

    It took hundreds of years before

    Everyone else caught on.

    The genius Archimedes once had

    An idea that made him shout "Eureka"

    He jumped out his bath, and ran down the path,

    Then ran about naked like a streaker!

    Another genius called Pythagoras

    Once discovered a very famous sum.

    This guy though, unlike the other fellow,

    Did not show everyone his bum.

    10. Reveal the rhyming words, and let the children know that in this poem there are half-rhymes. This is when words nearly rhyme, but not quite. Often, poets use words that sound

    similar, with similar ending consonants. This does not exactly match the middle vowel

    sounds. For example, sun and on, or democracy and philosophy.

    11. Now write the following words on the whiteboard: cave, tale, world, space. Go through each word and ask the children to name words that rhyme with the original

    words. Write them in a list under each original word.

    12. Now, ask the children to write a poem using six of the rhyming words on the board. They can use any of the words they like. Ask for volunteers to read out their poems.

    Pupils can use the exercises in the lesson to create poems to submit for the competition, or if

    they want to create their own original poems based on their own myths and legends, thats

    fine too! We look forward to receiving your entries!

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