By Sophie Honeybourne Conceptual Teaching with Literature

Download By Sophie Honeybourne Conceptual Teaching with Literature

Post on 31-Mar-2015

212 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

<ul><li>Slide 1</li></ul> <p>by Sophie Honeybourne Conceptual Teaching with Literature Slide 2 by Sophie Honeybourne Workshop Outline The new English syllabus and its implications for teaching and learning. What is conceptual teaching? Theory of conceptual understanding Developing a concept-based curriculum Why use literature to explore concepts? How can literature be used to explore concepts? Selecting and applying pedagogies to explore concepts through literature Examples of literature linked to concepts Resources to support conceptual teaching with literature Slide 3 by Sophie Honeybourne Organisation of NSW English Syllabus communicate through speaking, listening, reading, writing, viewing and representing* LEARNING TO SKILLS at word, sentence and text levels Focus on text production A B C D E use language to shape and make meaning according to purpose, audience and context LEARNING ABOUT KNOWLEDGE at word, sentence and text levels Focus on text analysis at word and sentence levels, and text layout think in ways that are imaginative, creative, interpretive and critical Creativity and LITERATURE express themselves and their relationships with others and their world TEXT LEVEL analysis including purpose, point of view and context learn and reflect on their learning through their study of English METACOGNITION Slide 4 by Sophie Honeybourne What are the implications for our practice from the new syllabus? Literature is now a core focus The new literacies: multimodality, multi- literacies and digital literacies Move away from text types to text purpose Increasing focus on language at sentence level Greater emphasis on text analysis, including viewpoints contained in the text and the overall context of the text Slide 5 by Sophie Honeybourne What is conceptual teaching? 21 st century learning and the theory of conceptual understanding Developing a concept-based curriculum Slide 6 by Sophie Honeybourne Framework for 21 st century learning: http://www.p21.orghttp://www.p21.org New educational context: 21 st century skills Australian Curriculum: General Capabilities Slide 7 by Sophie Honeybourne 21 st century learning in the curriculum Trying to teach in the 21 st century without conceptual schema for knowledge is like trying to build a house without a blueprint H Lynn Erickson, Concept-Based Curriculum and Instruction, 2009 Knowledge is now readily available. The understanding that underpins it is something that students need to develop. Conceptual understandings help to build trans-disciplinary connection of knowledge. Slide 8 by Sophie Honeybourne Conceptual teaching: a 3D model of curriculum design From: Concept based curriculum and instruction, H Lynn Erickson, 2012 www.slideshare.net Factual / Content Processes / Skills Two dimensional curriculum design Concepts, Principles &amp; Generalisations Processes / Skills Factual / Content Three dimensional curriculum design Slide 9 by Sophie Honeybourne Why conceptual teaching? Conceptual teaching integrates thinking in order to see the patterns and connections of knowledge at a conceptual and transferrable level of understanding SO Greater retention of information Deeper levels of understanding Increased motivation KNOW = factual knowledge which is locked in time, place or situation UNDERSTAND = conceptual understanding which transfers through time, across cultures and across situations. From: Concept based curriculum and instruction, H Lynn Erickson, 2012 www.slideshare.net Slide 10 by Sophie Honeybourne What is a concept and what is conceptual teaching? A concept is an organising idea; a mental construct. It is: Timeless Universal Abstract (to varying degrees) e.g. an abstract noun Represented by one or two words Conceptual teaching: Uses concepts and schema to organise new knowledge within conceptual units of work Teaches knowledge and skills in context, related to concepts Provides opportunities for students to connect their prior knowledge and understanding across curriculum areas Slide 11 by Sophie Honeybourne Conceptual teaching and the syllabus Programming using concepts as the drivers enables teachers to: cover the content of the syllabus or syllabi using a framework that connects outcomes and content create integrated cross curricular units of work and/or assessment tasks plan for the continuum of learning creating a scope and sequence across a stage or stages that builds the learning and reflects the specific learning needs of the students being targeted From: Transformations in Quality Programming, Karen Yager, 2008 Slide 12 by Sophie Honeybourne Organisation of Knowledge Think of a TOPIC you have taught, e.g. Australian Animals Which concept(s) could you map it onto? Slide 13 by Sophie Honeybourne ARTS ENGLISH HEALTH &amp; PHYSICAL EDUCATION CIVICS &amp; CITIZENSHIP (3-6) ECONMICS &amp; BUSINESS (5-6) HISTORY LANGUAGES MATHEMATICS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGIES RELEVANT K-6 SUBJECTS IN NEW CURRICULA: The image on this page has had to be removed due to copyright restrictions. Slide 14 by Sophie Honeybourne The solution? a CONCEPT based curriculum Concepts spiral and are revisitedWriting purpose linked to concepts Slide 15 by Sophie Honeybourne Example concepts and the new curricula 10 NEW Australian curricula onto which concepts need to be mapped (not all written yet!) Cross curriculum priorities: Sustainability (a concept in itself!) Asia and Australias engagement with Asia Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures Belonging Connections Diversity Difference Communication Migration General capabilities Slide 16 by Sophie Honeybourne Example concepts by subject : Scan the QR code to access a list of concepts derived from both the new Australian curricula and the current and new NSW curricula. Slide 17 by Sophie Honeybourne Why use literature to explore concepts? Slide 18 by Sophie Honeybourne Literature as an 'integrating device'......where it acts as the common thread which elicits deeper and more insightful engagements with learning and knowledge across discipline or subject areas (Seaton in PETA, 2002, p. 98) Slide 19 by Sophie Honeybourne Literature as a connecting device The mind is a narrative device: we run on stories. Stories unite all worlds. It is the compelling nature of stories and their telling that impacts on how we relate to each other, how we define who we are, and how and what we learn. Stories are an entry point for meaning-making - a place where learning and life merge. Stories contribute to our development as whole, coherent, human beings. Lowe, 2002, p.7 Narrative re-imagines the world for young people, and, in so doing, suggests way of thinking about the attitudes, values and beliefs of the culture presented in the text. McDonald, 2013, p.2 Slide 20 by Sophie Honeybourne So Literature functions as: a lens through which syllabus content can be explored under a conceptual umbrella a way in or perspective from which students can explore challenging ideas and concepts a safe space within which students can connect with concepts through the human experience an engaging and motivating way to explore concepts When you have 10 subject areas and their content to cover, it makes sense to start thinking and planning in an integrated way! Slide 21 by Sophie Honeybourne How can literature be used to explore concepts? Example conceptual program based on literature Selecting and applying literature-based pedagogies Examples of literature linked to concepts Resources to support conceptual teaching with literature Slide 22 by Sophie Honeybourne HOW can we explore concepts through texts? Knowledge / content / coda Are there factual elements in the text (e.g. hybrid texts)? What is the texts viewpoint and message and what can we learn from it? How can we connect this with our own understanding? Plot How does the context of events in the text (i.e. historical, social and cultural) help us to learn about relevant concepts? Can we view the sequence of events through a conceptual lens and connect to similar events and plots in other texts? Character How can we connect the characters experiences with our own? How do different characters present different viewpoints on concepts in the text? What can we learn from a characters experiences? Setting How can setting reveal underlying conceptual messages? Slide 23 by Sophie Honeybourne WHAT pedagogies can we use to explore concepts through texts? Literacy pedagogiesDrama pedagogies Slide 24 by Sophie Honeybourne Heres one I prepared earlier Year 1: Relationships with the land Slide 25 by Sophie Honeybourne Conceptual programming pro-forma Slide 26 by Sophie Honeybourne Examples of concepts linked to literature Belonging (!) Sustainability Community Connections Responsibility Diversity Interconnectedness Heritage Change Slide 27 by Sophie Honeybourne Examples of concepts linked to literature Community Difference Responsibility Power / Influence Identity Heritage Belonging Interconnectedness CBCA Picture Book of the Year 2012 Slide 28 by Sophie Honeybourne Examples of concepts linked to literature Sustainability Growth Change Adaptation Survival Interdependence Interconnectedness Heritage CBCA Information Book of the Year 2012 Slide 29 by Sophie Honeybourne Resources to support conceptual teaching with literature Global Words E4AC Slide 30 by Sophie Honeybourne Now its your turn! You will be given a text to look at between a group of 4 people Skim and scan and identify key concepts you could teach with the text (you can refer to the handout for a list of concepts) Brainstorm concept links to your text, and any teaching ideas, on our shared online whiteboard space using AWW (A Web Whiteboard). You will be given the URL in the session. Slide 31 by Sophie Honeybourne Bringing it all together Can you answer these questions? Why should I use conceptual teaching with literature in my classroom? How does it operate within the context of the new curricula? How will it improve student knowledge, understanding and performance? How will it make my life easier?!?! Slide 32 by Sophie Honeybourne Any questions? sophie.j.honeybourne@det.nsw.edu.au </p>