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Business Bristol Post, Special Report. Take-off for Airbus. Company enjoys its best ever performance at the UK's biggest trade airshow as sector soars - see page 11.

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  • 2EPB-E01-S3

    Businesswww.bristolpost.co.uk

    Company enjoys its best ever performance at theUKs biggest trade airshow as sector soars

    TAKE-OFFFOR AIRBUS

    SPECIAL REPORT

    see page 11

    162014JUL

    DONT MISS OUT

    SMEs chance to apply for shareof 5m in LEP funding p2

    MOMENTS IN TIME

    Time-lapse photography firmcaptures key patent p5

    RIPPLE EFFECT

    Marina transformationpowers town growth p8&9

    Airbus graduate Zainab Hassan isexcited about the new A350 XWB

  • EPB-E01-S3

    EPB-E0

    1-S3

    2 We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 3We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 w w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/businessw w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/business

    Technology firm XMOS makes multi-core processor chips

    AFIRM that designs micropro-cessors has secured morethan $26 million (15 million)of investment from somemajor technology players in-cluding Bosch and Huawei.XMOS was originally a spin-off

    from Bristol University and now em-ploys about 40 people at its WineStreet headquarters and another 30around the globe.The company designs multi-core

    microprocessors used in devices ran-ging from headphones to lawn-m owe r s.This big investment will allow the

    firm to develop future generations ofits processors, which it hopes will beused in even more devices.XMOS chief operating officer Mark

    Lippett said the firm made platfor mtechnolog y.He said: Sony has been using our

    technology in the audio space; wealso have customers using the samechips in laser etching devices androbotic spiders.

    These are very flexible processorsand have a breadth of reach acrossmultiple markets.

    Our strategy to build on thatbroad base and we are very am-b i t i o u s. He said the company would be

    taking on staff, but would not besplashing its cash recklessly.Mark said aside from the cash, the

    investment was a great signal toother potential customers.

    These [investors] are three im-portant companies which feel con-fident enough to put money behindu s, he said.Both Huawei and Bosch Group are

    both potential customers for XMOS.The former is a Chinese-based ITsolutions firm which recently an-nounced plans for a research centrein Bristol. The latter is best knownfor its sound equipment from hi-fis toheadphones but is also a leading sup-plier of technology for the automot-ive, building and energy industries.The third new investor is Xilinx

    Technology Ventures, the investmentarm of Silicon Valley-based Xilinx,which works in a similar sphere toXMOS.

    VWV managing partner Simon Heald and Midas executive director Derek Quinn at Narrow Quay House

    D eve l o p m e n t Te c h n o l o g y

    Midas touch as buildinggets dramatic new lookA CITY centre office building isundergoing a dramatic 7.3 millionre f u r b i s h m e n t .Bristol-based building firm Midas

    is undertaking the overhaul of Nar-row Quay House, which was sittingempty in Bristols Harbourside.The plans involve expanding and

    modernising the building, creating aglazed atrium.The building, which spans 58,000

    sq ft, is owned by investment firmStandard Life Heritage With ProfitsFund but it isVeale Wasborough Vis-ards which will be leasing most ofthe space once it is finished.The law firm has outgrown its city

    centre spot and will be moving its 250staff in, plus have room to grow.Managing partner Simon Heald

    said: Narrow Quay House willprovide the space we need to supportour future growth. Whilst support-ing our objectives of retaining a citycentre location, a great working en-vironment on the waterfront, andbeing accessible to staff and cli-e n t s. Work began in May and is due to

    finish in spring 2015.

    G row t h

    SMEs chance to apply for share of5m in fresh round of LEP funding

    SMALL and medium sized busi-ness in Bristol can apply for ashare of 5 million for projectsthat will create jobs... but theyneed to be quick as the cashhas to be spent by April next year.The money is available from the

    West of England Local EnterprisePar tnerships Growth Fund.More than 300 companies have

    already successfully applied forgrants in the first two rounds of fund-ing, the first of which was supportingby the Bristol Post Going for Growthcampaign.But with around 5 million of the

    original 25 million pot still available,new applications are being accepted.

    Funding manager Antony Corfieldsaid: The first two rounds of the Westof England Growth Fund have en-abled us to award funding to a wholerange of businesses to help with cap-ital investment, job creation and re-search & development.

    The 25 million has to be spent byApril 2015 otherwise it goes back tothe Government, so weve launched athird round to make sure we get asmuch out to local companies as pos-sible before then.The Growth Fund aims to bring

    about new jobs and to lever privatesector investment with the promise ofmatch funding. The fund is itself fin-anced from the Governments Re-gional Growth Fund, designed to kickstart projects to boost the economyacross the UK.The money is for schemes that

    would not otherwise have been pos-sible, or would have taken longer to

    come about.Grants of 10,000 to 80,000 in this

    latest round can be used by small andmedium sized firms towards capitalinvestment such as new premises orequipment; research and develop-ment; training; employing disabledor disadvantaged workers; and sup-

    porting women entrepreneurs tostart a business.But as the money has to be used on

    projects in this financial year, theclock is ticking.Antony said: We re into the last

    nine months of this particular fundnow, so were keen to get fundingallocated to businesses as soon aspossible, to ensure they have time tospend it before April 2015.

    We have a funding team here tohelp companies with both the ap-plication and the claims process. Ifyou have a project that you thinkmight be eligible for funding, pleaseget in touch with us.Businesses can email the funding

    team on growthfundapps@west-ofengland.org or call them on 0117 9036207.Or visit the website w w w. w e s t -

    ofenglandlep.co.uk/we gfr3 wh i chgoes live today for more details.

    Film production

    Company that recycles film sets moves into city site

    Hackathon looks toimprove takeaway app AN online takeaway service isgiving people access to itstechnology to play around and see ifthey come up with any great ideas.Just Eat, which is opening a

    research centre in the city, is holdinga hackathon at the Engine Shed allday Saturday, starting at 8am.Bristols tech talent are invited to

    use the firms programminginstructions and look for ways ofimproving its app. Ideas fromprevious events have been used byJust Eat, including using near fieldcommunication-enabled posters.Chief technology officer, Carlos

    Morgado, said: The regularhackathons weve been running atour central London offices areessential to our innovation process,enabling us to learn from those bothinside and outside the company.

    Now, with our new technologyinnovation hub in Bristol, we canaccess the brilliant pool of techtalent based throughout the SouthWest. Im looking forward to seeingthe results from the day.Anyone taking part gets a 20

    voucher and the best idea wins aradio-controlled drone. Registeronline at w w w. m e e t u p . c o m /J U S T- E AT- B r i s t o l / e v e n t s /194104862/.Inward investment agency Invest

    Bristol & Bath worked with the firmon its move to the city.

    Firm wins contract tosupply energy plant A BEDMINSTER firm has won acontract to supply a control systemfor a new waste energy plant.GPS, which employs 80 people,

    will supply the technology to ImtechWater for the anaerobic digestionplant being built by Tamar Energy inH e r t f o rd s h i re .GPS motor control centres will

    monitor and control mixing,pre-treatment and the digestionprocesses used to produce biogasfrom food waste.The firm previously made a similar

    system for Wessex Water to use atits Avonmouth treatment plant.

    Te c h n o l o g y

    Te c h n o l o g y

    Microprocessor firm wins 15minvestment from major players

    A GREEN film set company is thelatest business to move into the BottleYard film studios in Hengrove.More and more film and television

    projects are being shot at the formerbottle plant and as a result an eco-system of businesses is beginning tobuild up around it.The latest firm is Drsd, an in-

    novative company that clears setsand then re-uses, recycles or sells onthe materials to production houses,interior designers and charities.It also offers event production and

    office re-fit services making good use

    of its salvage haul. It is based atPinewood Studios with awarehouse in Essex butfounder Lynn McFarlane(p i c t u re d ) said it alwayshoped to set up regionalb a s e s.

    It's always been ourintention to have re-gional bases located con-veniently around the UKto service the demands ofour customers, she said. Soto open a new centre at The BottleYard Studios so soon after moving

    into our new headquarters isheartening for us as a busi-

    ness, and also speaksvolumes about the grow-ing demand amongstour domestic broadcastindustry to deliver sus-tainable productionsfrom concept to wrap.Fiona Francombe,

    managing director of TheBottle Yard Studios added:

    We re so pleased to welcomeDrsd to our growing production

    h u b.

    Sustainability in the broadcast in-dustry is something we care deeplyabout, and having Drsd on site per-manently is a great boost to the stu-dios ongoing drive to reduce waste.

    Departing productions will beable to send less waste to landfillwhilst incoming productions willhave the chance to benefit from whatis left behind by others.

    Its a win-win situation and onethat helps us to reduce our carbonfo o t p r i n t . In 2012-3, Drsd recovered and re-

    used 396.2 tonnes of film set waste.

    Assistant Editor (Business)Gavin Thompson

    Call 0117 934 3336Email gavin.thompson

    @b-nm.co.ukTwitter @gavin_thompson1

    Get in touch

    Writer Rupert JanischEmail business@b-nm.co.uk

    Advertising RobertRodgerson

    Call07828 941469Email ro b e r t . ro d g e r s o n

    @b-nm.co.uk

    Advertising JaneChapmanCall 01179 343025Email jane.chapman@b-nm.co.uk

    Advertising ShamaAbokor, RegionalBusiness Account

    ExecutiveCall 0117 934 3426

    Emailshama.abokor@b-nm.co.uk

    ciple at Robert Bosch Venture CapitalGmbH who will be joining the XMOSboard, described the firm as one ofthe most exciting young semicon-ductor companies around today.He said: We see a huge potential

    for their intelligent multi-core tech-nology in various sectors of our par-ent company.Steve Chu, chief strategy officer

    and vice President at Huaweis sil-icon division, added: We have a veryhigh regard for the team at XMOSand will be working closely withthem on a number of exciting newp ro j e c t s. And despite the extra cash in the

    coffers, Mark said the firm wouldcontinue to be run on a sound busi-ness footing.

    Its about finding the right staff forp ro j e c t s, he said, adding: We arewell embedded in Bristol and drawtalent from around here.

    Without that pool of talent wewould not be able to do what we do.

    Gavin ThompsonAssistant Editor (Business)gavin.thompson@b-nm.co.uk

    Foreign investment creating hundreds of jobsINVESTMENT from foreign com-panies is creating hundreds jobs inBristol.Overseas firms made 27 direct in-

    vestments in the area, West of Eng-land area last year, creating 648 jobs,according to new figures released byUK Trade and Investment.The total is up 450 per cent from

    the 161 jobs created two years earlierin 2011/12.The economy has recovered in that

    period but it has also seen the cre-ation of Invest Bristol & Bath, whichis tasked with bringing investmentto Bristol, North Somerset, SouthGloucestershire and Bath and NorthEast Somerset.Matt Cross (p i c t u re d ), head of the

    organisation, said he was d e-

    lighted and that the local figureshad made a substantial impact on thenational performance.He said: Our strategy is focused

    on attracting new investment thatcreates jobs in the Bristol and Bathre gion.

    We work closely with industryexperts to gather important insightsso that we can generate rich in-vestment propositions targeted atthe most appropriate investors.

    This approach has been critical inour recent success in attracting somuch high quality investment to there gion.

    We are very pleased with ourachievements to date and are wellpositioned to make further progressas the economy and our capability

    i m p rove.It is clear we are now making a

    meaningful impact on the na-tional foreign direct in-vestment picture.Across the UK, the

    number of projects at-tracting foreign dir-ect investment rose14 per cent from2012/13 to 2-13/24.Projects in this

    area during that timei n cl u d e : Somo, the worldsbiggest mobile solutionscompany, which has set up aspecialist engineering centre at theEngine Shed, Temple Meads. Specialist software firm Kanios,

    based in Belfast, opening a new officein Bristol.

    Asian automotive manufac-turing firm Sanoh openinga new site int he city.

    On the national pic-ture, Prime MinisterDavid Cameron said:This Governmentwill continue to workon behalf of everyhardworking busi-ness in the UK todrum up trade, encour-

    age investment and pavethe way for growth so we

    can generate jobs, pay ourway in the world, and create stability,security and a brighter future for ourc o u n t r y.

    Derek Quinn, executive director atMidas Construction, described it as af antastic project that would trans-form a very prominent commercialbuilding in the centre of the city.He said: The logistics of carrying

    out the internal renovations arechallenging and involve a lot ofcareful planning, with a complexsteel frame installation needing tocome through the front entrance andbe erected within the building tocreate the extra floor space, for ex-a m p l e.

    The existing faade will be re-moved from the outside of the build-ing and a dramatic new designcreated, with a double height en-trance to Princes Street.

    The development is of a very highquality, with our client and ourselvesworking closely with AWW Archi-tects to create an extremely high-endoffice development to benefit Bristolcity centre.Standard Life fund manager Will

    Fulton said the investment wouldimprove the public realm and addedthe firm was delighted to have ahigh-profile tenant.

    Opportunity to makeyour voice heard THE Bristol Post wants to hearthe views of small andmedium-sized businesses.Last year the Post teamed up with

    business advisers BDO to launchthe Business Pulse survey.We have already reported some of

    the findings from the first surveycarried out in the spring.Now we are looking for the

    owners and managers of such firmsto take part in the second survey,focusing on sustainability, the role ofthe mid-market in the economicrecovery, and apprenticeships..Post assistant editor (business)

    Gavin Thompson said: OurBusiness Pulse has the ear of theleaders, influencers and decisionmakers in the Bristol area.

    Taking part is a not-to-be-missedchance for the business communityto make its voice heard.

    Business Pulse

    As strategic investors the compan-ies will more than likely leave XMOSto get on with developing newproducts, recognising that new com-

    panies are often more agile when itcomes to development and ideas, butcash in on the profits.Hongquan Jiang, investment prin-

    Mark Lippett

    We are wellembedded inBristol and drawtalent from aroundhere. Without thatpool of talent wewould not be ableto do what we do

    Gavin ThompsonAssistant Editor (Business)gavin.thompson@b-nm.co.uk

    FundingmanagerAntonyCorfield

    Tell us your views on sustainability, the role of the mid-market in the economic recovery and the importance of apprenticeships. Scan the QR code below using the scanner on your smartphone or visit http://tinyurl.com/bristolpulseqr

    HB06265_Bristol Business Pulse campaign_50 x 100.indd 17/17/2014 11:56:38 AM

  • EPB-E01-S3

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    1-S3

    2 We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 3We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 w w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/businessw w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/business

    Technology firm XMOS makes multi-core processor chips

    AFIRM that designs micropro-cessors has secured morethan $26 million (15 million)of investment from somemajor technology players in-cluding Bosch and Huawei.XMOS was originally a spin-off

    from Bristol University and now em-ploys about 40 people at its WineStreet headquarters and another 30around the globe.The company designs multi-core

    microprocessors used in devices ran-ging from headphones to lawn-m owe r s.This big investment will allow the

    firm to develop future generations ofits processors, which it hopes will beused in even more devices.XMOS chief operating officer Mark

    Lippett said the firm made platfor mtechnolog y.He said: Sony has been using our

    technology in the audio space; wealso have customers using the samechips in laser etching devices androbotic spiders.

    These are very flexible processorsand have a breadth of reach acrossmultiple markets.

    Our strategy to build on thatbroad base and we are very am-b i t i o u s. He said the company would be

    taking on staff, but would not besplashing its cash recklessly.Mark said aside from the cash, the

    investment was a great signal toother potential customers.

    These [investors] are three im-portant companies which feel con-fident enough to put money behindu s, he said.Both Huawei and Bosch Group are

    both potential customers for XMOS.The former is a Chinese-based ITsolutions firm which recently an-nounced plans for a research centrein Bristol. The latter is best knownfor its sound equipment from hi-fis toheadphones but is also a leading sup-plier of technology for the automot-ive, building and energy industries.The third new investor is Xilinx

    Technology Ventures, the investmentarm of Silicon Valley-based Xilinx,which works in a similar sphere toXMOS.

    VWV managing partner Simon Heald and Midas executive director Derek Quinn at Narrow Quay House

    D eve l o p m e n t Te c h n o l o g y

    Midas touch as buildinggets dramatic new lookA CITY centre office building isundergoing a dramatic 7.3 millionre f u r b i s h m e n t .Bristol-based building firm Midas

    is undertaking the overhaul of Nar-row Quay House, which was sittingempty in Bristols Harbourside.The plans involve expanding and

    modernising the building, creating aglazed atrium.The building, which spans 58,000

    sq ft, is owned by investment firmStandard Life Heritage With ProfitsFund but it isVeale Wasborough Vis-ards which will be leasing most ofthe space once it is finished.The law firm has outgrown its city

    centre spot and will be moving its 250staff in, plus have room to grow.Managing partner Simon Heald

    said: Narrow Quay House willprovide the space we need to supportour future growth. Whilst support-ing our objectives of retaining a citycentre location, a great working en-vironment on the waterfront, andbeing accessible to staff and cli-e n t s. Work began in May and is due to

    finish in spring 2015.

    G row t h

    SMEs chance to apply for share of5m in fresh round of LEP funding

    SMALL and medium sized busi-ness in Bristol can apply for ashare of 5 million for projectsthat will create jobs... but theyneed to be quick as the cashhas to be spent by April next year.The money is available from the

    West of England Local EnterprisePar tnerships Growth Fund.More than 300 companies have

    already successfully applied forgrants in the first two rounds of fund-ing, the first of which was supportingby the Bristol Post Going for Growthcampaign.But with around 5 million of the

    original 25 million pot still available,new applications are being accepted.

    Funding manager Antony Corfieldsaid: The first two rounds of the Westof England Growth Fund have en-abled us to award funding to a wholerange of businesses to help with cap-ital investment, job creation and re-search & development.

    The 25 million has to be spent byApril 2015 otherwise it goes back tothe Government, so weve launched athird round to make sure we get asmuch out to local companies as pos-sible before then.The Growth Fund aims to bring

    about new jobs and to lever privatesector investment with the promise ofmatch funding. The fund is itself fin-anced from the Governments Re-gional Growth Fund, designed to kickstart projects to boost the economyacross the UK.The money is for schemes that

    would not otherwise have been pos-sible, or would have taken longer to

    come about.Grants of 10,000 to 80,000 in this

    latest round can be used by small andmedium sized firms towards capitalinvestment such as new premises orequipment; research and develop-ment; training; employing disabledor disadvantaged workers; and sup-

    porting women entrepreneurs tostart a business.But as the money has to be used on

    projects in this financial year, theclock is ticking.Antony said: We re into the last

    nine months of this particular fundnow, so were keen to get fundingallocated to businesses as soon aspossible, to ensure they have time tospend it before April 2015.

    We have a funding team here tohelp companies with both the ap-plication and the claims process. Ifyou have a project that you thinkmight be eligible for funding, pleaseget in touch with us.Businesses can email the funding

    team on growthfundapps@west-ofengland.org or call them on 0117 9036207.Or visit the website w w w. w e s t -

    ofenglandlep.co.uk/we gfr3 wh i chgoes live today for more details.

    Film production

    Company that recycles film sets moves into city site

    Hackathon looks toimprove takeaway app AN online takeaway service isgiving people access to itstechnology to play around and see ifthey come up with any great ideas.Just Eat, which is opening a

    research centre in the city, is holdinga hackathon at the Engine Shed allday Saturday, starting at 8am.Bristols tech talent are invited to

    use the firms programminginstructions and look for ways ofimproving its app. Ideas fromprevious events have been used byJust Eat, including using near fieldcommunication-enabled posters.Chief technology officer, Carlos

    Morgado, said: The regularhackathons weve been running atour central London offices areessential to our innovation process,enabling us to learn from those bothinside and outside the company.

    Now, with our new technologyinnovation hub in Bristol, we canaccess the brilliant pool of techtalent based throughout the SouthWest. Im looking forward to seeingthe results from the day.Anyone taking part gets a 20

    voucher and the best idea wins aradio-controlled drone. Registeronline at w w w. m e e t u p . c o m /J U S T- E AT- B r i s t o l / e v e n t s /194104862/.Inward investment agency Invest

    Bristol & Bath worked with the firmon its move to the city.

    Firm wins contract tosupply energy plant A BEDMINSTER firm has won acontract to supply a control systemfor a new waste energy plant.GPS, which employs 80 people,

    will supply the technology to ImtechWater for the anaerobic digestionplant being built by Tamar Energy inH e r t f o rd s h i re .GPS motor control centres will

    monitor and control mixing,pre-treatment and the digestionprocesses used to produce biogasfrom food waste.The firm previously made a similar

    system for Wessex Water to use atits Avonmouth treatment plant.

    Te c h n o l o g y

    Te c h n o l o g y

    Microprocessor firm wins 15minvestment from major players

    A GREEN film set company is thelatest business to move into the BottleYard film studios in Hengrove.More and more film and television

    projects are being shot at the formerbottle plant and as a result an eco-system of businesses is beginning tobuild up around it.The latest firm is Drsd, an in-

    novative company that clears setsand then re-uses, recycles or sells onthe materials to production houses,interior designers and charities.It also offers event production and

    office re-fit services making good use

    of its salvage haul. It is based atPinewood Studios with awarehouse in Essex butfounder Lynn McFarlane(p i c t u re d ) said it alwayshoped to set up regionalb a s e s.

    It's always been ourintention to have re-gional bases located con-veniently around the UKto service the demands ofour customers, she said. Soto open a new centre at The BottleYard Studios so soon after moving

    into our new headquarters isheartening for us as a busi-

    ness, and also speaksvolumes about the grow-ing demand amongstour domestic broadcastindustry to deliver sus-tainable productionsfrom concept to wrap.Fiona Francombe,

    managing director of TheBottle Yard Studios added:

    We re so pleased to welcomeDrsd to our growing production

    h u b.

    Sustainability in the broadcast in-dustry is something we care deeplyabout, and having Drsd on site per-manently is a great boost to the stu-dios ongoing drive to reduce waste.

    Departing productions will beable to send less waste to landfillwhilst incoming productions willhave the chance to benefit from whatis left behind by others.

    Its a win-win situation and onethat helps us to reduce our carbonfo o t p r i n t . In 2012-3, Drsd recovered and re-

    used 396.2 tonnes of film set waste.

    Assistant Editor (Business)Gavin Thompson

    Call 0117 934 3336Email gavin.thompson

    @b-nm.co.ukTwitter @gavin_thompson1

    Get in touch

    Writer Rupert JanischEmail business@b-nm.co.uk

    Advertising RobertRodgerson

    Call07828 941469Email ro b e r t . ro d g e r s o n

    @b-nm.co.uk

    Advertising JaneChapmanCall 01179 343025Email jane.chapman@b-nm.co.uk

    Advertising ShamaAbokor, RegionalBusiness Account

    ExecutiveCall 0117 934 3426

    Emailshama.abokor@b-nm.co.uk

    ciple at Robert Bosch Venture CapitalGmbH who will be joining the XMOSboard, described the firm as one ofthe most exciting young semicon-ductor companies around today.He said: We see a huge potential

    for their intelligent multi-core tech-nology in various sectors of our par-ent company.Steve Chu, chief strategy officer

    and vice President at Huaweis sil-icon division, added: We have a veryhigh regard for the team at XMOSand will be working closely withthem on a number of exciting newp ro j e c t s. And despite the extra cash in the

    coffers, Mark said the firm wouldcontinue to be run on a sound busi-ness footing.

    Its about finding the right staff forp ro j e c t s, he said, adding: We arewell embedded in Bristol and drawtalent from around here.

    Without that pool of talent wewould not be able to do what we do.

    Gavin ThompsonAssistant Editor (Business)gavin.thompson@b-nm.co.uk

    Foreign investment creating hundreds of jobsINVESTMENT from foreign com-panies is creating hundreds jobs inBristol.Overseas firms made 27 direct in-

    vestments in the area, West of Eng-land area last year, creating 648 jobs,according to new figures released byUK Trade and Investment.The total is up 450 per cent from

    the 161 jobs created two years earlierin 2011/12.The economy has recovered in that

    period but it has also seen the cre-ation of Invest Bristol & Bath, whichis tasked with bringing investmentto Bristol, North Somerset, SouthGloucestershire and Bath and NorthEast Somerset.Matt Cross (p i c t u re d ), head of the

    organisation, said he was d e-

    lighted and that the local figureshad made a substantial impact on thenational performance.He said: Our strategy is focused

    on attracting new investment thatcreates jobs in the Bristol and Bathre gion.

    We work closely with industryexperts to gather important insightsso that we can generate rich in-vestment propositions targeted atthe most appropriate investors.

    This approach has been critical inour recent success in attracting somuch high quality investment to there gion.

    We are very pleased with ourachievements to date and are wellpositioned to make further progressas the economy and our capability

    i m p rove.It is clear we are now making a

    meaningful impact on the na-tional foreign direct in-vestment picture.Across the UK, the

    number of projects at-tracting foreign dir-ect investment rose14 per cent from2012/13 to 2-13/24.Projects in this

    area during that timei n cl u d e : Somo, the worldsbiggest mobile solutionscompany, which has set up aspecialist engineering centre at theEngine Shed, Temple Meads. Specialist software firm Kanios,

    based in Belfast, opening a new officein Bristol.

    Asian automotive manufac-turing firm Sanoh openinga new site int he city.

    On the national pic-ture, Prime MinisterDavid Cameron said:This Governmentwill continue to workon behalf of everyhardworking busi-ness in the UK todrum up trade, encour-

    age investment and pavethe way for growth so we

    can generate jobs, pay ourway in the world, and create stability,security and a brighter future for ourc o u n t r y.

    Derek Quinn, executive director atMidas Construction, described it as af antastic project that would trans-form a very prominent commercialbuilding in the centre of the city.He said: The logistics of carrying

    out the internal renovations arechallenging and involve a lot ofcareful planning, with a complexsteel frame installation needing tocome through the front entrance andbe erected within the building tocreate the extra floor space, for ex-a m p l e.

    The existing faade will be re-moved from the outside of the build-ing and a dramatic new designcreated, with a double height en-trance to Princes Street.

    The development is of a very highquality, with our client and ourselvesworking closely with AWW Archi-tects to create an extremely high-endoffice development to benefit Bristolcity centre.Standard Life fund manager Will

    Fulton said the investment wouldimprove the public realm and addedthe firm was delighted to have ahigh-profile tenant.

    Opportunity to makeyour voice heard THE Bristol Post wants to hearthe views of small andmedium-sized businesses.Last year the Post teamed up with

    business advisers BDO to launchthe Business Pulse survey.We have already reported some of

    the findings from the first surveycarried out in the spring.Now we are looking for the

    owners and managers of such firmsto take part in the second survey,focusing on sustainability, the role ofthe mid-market in the economicrecovery, and apprenticeships..Post assistant editor (business)

    Gavin Thompson said: OurBusiness Pulse has the ear of theleaders, influencers and decisionmakers in the Bristol area.

    Taking part is a not-to-be-missedchance for the business communityto make its voice heard.

    Business Pulse

    As strategic investors the compan-ies will more than likely leave XMOSto get on with developing newproducts, recognising that new com-

    panies are often more agile when itcomes to development and ideas, butcash in on the profits.Hongquan Jiang, investment prin-

    Mark Lippett

    We are wellembedded inBristol and drawtalent from aroundhere. Without thatpool of talent wewould not be ableto do what we do

    Gavin ThompsonAssistant Editor (Business)gavin.thompson@b-nm.co.uk

    FundingmanagerAntonyCorfield

    Tell us your views on sustainability, the role of the mid-market in the economic recovery and the importance of apprenticeships. Scan the QR code below using the scanner on your smartphone or visit http://tinyurl.com/bristolpulseqr

    HB06265_Bristol Business Pulse campaign_50 x 100.indd 17/17/2014 11:56:38 AM

  • EPB-E01-S3

    EPB-E0

    1-S3

    4 We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 5We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 w w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/businessw w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/business

    C o n s u l t a n cy

    ACCOUNTING and con-sultancy network MooreStephens has added to itspresence in the South Westwith the opening of a newoffice in Bristol.The firm has run an office in Bath

    for several years, but four of theregional partners have now moved togrow the Moore Stephens capacity inBristol city centre.The accountancy element of the

    Redcliffe Street office will be headedup by Robert Branch, while theMoore Stephens LLP Corporate Re-covery specialism in the city con-tinues to be led by SteveRamsbottom.Other senior staff at the new office

    will include Mark Chesham as dir-

    ector of indirect tax services, LuciParry and Jake Jukes as senior busi-ness services managers and StephenMaggs as senior personal tax man-a g er.Mr Branch said: Moore Stephens

    has identified a gap in the market forgood quality and competit-ively-priced business advice wherebywe work with the clients in order toachieve their business goals.

    We take a genuine interest in thebusinesses that our clients operateand with them being both owners andmanagers of the business in manycases, speaking to people who see thegood and the bad within many otherbusinesses provides them with a lotof value.

    The new office will also provide astrong capability to offer advice andsupport in restructuring and insolv-e n cy. Mr Ramsbottom said: We look to

    offer practical solutions to the prob-lems facing clients. Our first priority

    is to focus upon recovery and re-integrating businesses into the livetrading arena.

    We only see formal insolvencyprocedures as an option of last resort,and remain proud of our longstand-ing national reputation which con-firms this approach.Moore Stephens was founded in

    London in 1907 and today the UKnetwork has more than 1,500 partnersand staff. The companys philosophyhas been to develop to cater for itscl i e n t s needs whenever required, butnot to grow for the sake of sizea l o n e.The Moore Stephens International

    network now claims to be one of theleading international accounting andconsulting networks outside the BigFo u r of KPMG, Deloitte, Pricewa-terhouseCoopers and Ernst & Young.It comprises 630 offices of memberand correspondent firms in 98 coun-tries worldwide, involving over 20,000partners, principals and staff.

    Office launch Firm sees agap for top quality a d v i ce

    Moore Stephens Bristol management team, from left, Steve Maggs, Luci Parry, Mark Chesham and Robert Branch

    I n n ova t i o n

    Pioneers win patent for advancein time-lapse photography tech

    ACOMPANY that specialisesin time-lapse photographyhas secured a patent for newtechnology that lets peoplecontrol and monitor cam-eras by text message.Queen Square-based Lobster Pic-

    tures created the so-called crab con-trol and monitoring module in 2010.Bosses took the decision to develop

    a new system because they no longerwanted to rely on third-party tech-nolog y.The crab was initially conceived to

    be a power control unit, letting theteam know if there was a power cuton site and acting as a back-up.It then evolved into a remote

    time-lapse controller in its ownright.About two years into development,

    the team realised there was nothingelse like it on the market and appliedfor the patent.The device is part of its Lobster Pot

    camera system, which is used in theTate Modern where it has beenrunning for four years, night andday, allowing people to watch theextension of the gallery as it hap-p e n s.More recently Lobster installed

    cameras in Dawlish after the railwayline was washed away in stormsearly this year. Its cameras capturedthe damage and subsequent recon-struction of the line.The crab units have been used in

    cameras on projects ranging fromnew sports stadia, off shore windfarms and oil platforms, working inenvironments from the Finnishwinter to summer in Dubai.Managing director Robbie Allen

    said Our clients demand long-term,monitored and measured, 100 percent reliability in their time lapseand monitoring systems.

    The crab is the heart of our greatcamera and its now running in over

    Managingd i re c t o rRobbieAllen andtechinicald i re c t o rMichaelMcKelvaneyat LobsterP i c t u re sPhotograph:Dave BettsBRDB20140714A-001_A

    Building projects facedelays over skills gap BUILDING projects in the city arefacing delays of up to three monthsdue to shortages of skills andl a b o u r.The growing economy has seen

    the construction sector pick up, withhousing and commercial projectsthat had been mothballed finallygetting under way. But Tim Harris,director of project management atcommercial property firm JLL inBristol, said there was a lack ofskilled workers to meet demand.He said major projects such as

    the new Southmead Hospital hadabsorbed much of the existingworkforce in jobs from bricklayersand electricians through to sitemanagers and surveyors.Tim (pictur ed) said: During the

    re c e s s i o n ,subcontract-ors andconsultantsbattened downthe hatches,shrinking thesize of theirbusinesses inthe face ofeconomicuncertainty and, tomake it worse, a lot of people haveleft the industry altogether.

    The latest RICS market surveyhighlights that 51 per cent of firmsare concerned that there isinsufficient labour to meet demand.

    Now, although there are signs ofeconomic improvement, smallbusinesses are very reluctant tocommit to expansion, having hadtheir fingers burnt in the past. Andwith the possibility of increasedinterest rates looming, instead theyare cherry-picking jobs.

    This is leaving developers facinga shortfall of labour, resulting indelays to key building projects in theregion of up to three months.The pressures will continue with

    more big projects in the pipeline.Office building has started again inBristol, but there are also plans byUWE to expand and some majornew homes schemes in the pipeline.Tim said: Thankfully the worst is

    over in terms of the economicconditions, which is providingmuch-needed relief. But this changein fortune has its challenges. Thereis an increasing demand forbuildings to be constructed at afaster and faster pace. However, thecurrent skills gap means it is difficultto meet this demand and the cost oflabour is being pushed up so thedevelopers are incurring increasedcosts and delays.

    C o n st r u c t i o nLandlords warnedover air conditioning LANDLORDS are being warnednot to get caught out by changes torules on air conditioning systems.From January next year air

    conditioning systems using theozone-depleting refrigerant R22 willbe banned, meaning it will beagainst the law to maintain them.Christian Crawfurd, a senior

    surveyor from commercial propertyfirm DTZ, said the substance waswidely used before 2004.

    So systems that are more than10 years old will need to beassessed, he said.

    Options available to landlordsinclude replacing the system in itsentirety or using an alternativemodern refrigerant which willnormally involve replacing parts ofthe AC system. There is howeverdebate that the latter may lead topoorer equipment performance andas a result, higher energy costs.He said the matter of who had to

    meet the costs, landlord or tenant,would depend on the terms of thelease.

    We advise considering thisimportant change well in advance oflease events, such as break dates,expiries and rent reviews, and spacedisposal or acquisition, he added.

    L aw

    Managementfirm expanding THE trend towards apartmentliving has led a property managementfirm to expand.Downend-based BNS Property

    Management handles 200 sites in theregion but demand is growing in linewith more apartment blocks havingbeen built.Managing director Andrew

    Simmonds said: So many apartmentblocks were built in the first ten yearsof this century and the maintenancecontracts were either faced with firmswho use sub-contractors or residentsthemselves took responsibility.

    Inevitably people move out andsometimes those who replace themare less enthusiastic about the tasksto be carried out. We have seen amajor expansion of our business aswe have an in-house team ratherthan sub-contractors, which keepscosts down and gives us greatercontrol over the situation.The firm is creating 10 jobs, with

    roles including a maintenancemanager, a property inspector andmaintenance workers.

    Proper ty

    Rovers renew linkswith IT education firm FOOTBALL club Bristol Rovershas renewed its relationship witheducation IT provider Hexakis.The Redcliff firm works with

    schools to improve standards ofteaching through the use oftechnology, as well as supportingRovers education department.Adam Tutton, head of education

    at the club, said: Over the last threeyears the support we have receivedfrom Hexakis has allowed us togreatly enhance our pupils learningexperience.The firm holds seminars and

    workshops at the stadium, the mostrecent being a session for ITteachers earlier this month.Hexakis managing director

    Robbie Smith said: Schools arefacing huge challenges withdelivering the new curriculum.

    Ed u c a t i o n

    Divisions split A BRISTOL design firm working inthe new Bath & North-East Somersetcouncil offices in Keynsham isbreaking up.Aedas is splitting its UK and Hong

    Kong divisions into separate firms.The UK business, which has an officein Clifton Triangle, will become AHR.Chairman Brian Johnson said:

    AHR has a long-standing history ofproducing award-winning designs,something which we will continueinto the future. We are proud of ourregional UK heritage and willcontinue to offer the excellent levelsof services from all our offices.

    D es i g n

    Gavin ThompsonAssistant Editor (Business)gavin.thompson@b-nm.co.uk

    UWE Bristol is building a 50 millionBusiness School as it aims to meet theneeds of employers in the future.The new building, which will also

    house the law school, is part of theu n ive r s i t y s campus redevelopmentplan.Professor Jane Harrington, pro

    vice chancellor and executive dean ofthe Faculty of Business and Law, saidthe university needed to adapt.She said: The business world is

    changing rapidly and we need to edu-cate the next generation of businessleaders in a way that meets the needsof businesses.

    For example, we know that thegreatest growth area is in SMEs, andstudents need a wide range of skills tobe valuable in a small business.

    Our relationship with businessescan help us create placements forstudents to prepare them for theworld of work, so they make a con-tribution from day one.

    We know that employers are look-ing for soft skills, such as team work-ing, project management andcommunication, as well as the know-ledge and analytical skills gainedthrough a university education.

    Our role is to be part of the real

    world of business, to reach out tobusiness and enable them to reach into us. There are huge benefits forbusinesses of working closely with a

    Ed u c a t i o n

    UWE reaching out withbusiness school plans

    modern practice-based universitylike UWE Bristol, and this new build-ing will create the opportunity toenable this to happen by fostering

    informal and formal interaction.She said she wanted to create a

    building where professionals, stu-dents and academics could mingle,with key professional bodies havingbases within the school.She added: Bringing businesses

    into the university will enable themto access a whole range of benefits,from research opportunities to stu-dent placements to consultancywo rk .

    It will also be hugely beneficial forstudents enabling them to have dir-ect contact with the real world ofwork and helping them develop theskills they need to be attractive toe m p l oye r s.

    In addition, what we do in busi-ness and law education can help tofuel the economy and growth. Ournew building can help us to supportthe growth agenda.The university has submitted a

    planning application for the proposedbuilding on its Frenchay campus.

    Rupert JanischBusiness@b-nm.co.uk 150 locations, from Beijing to

    B o l iv i a . Technical director Michael McK-

    elvaney said the UK patent was asignificant landmark for the firm.He said: Being awarded this pat-

    ent proves were an innovator inhigh tech industry.

    An example of this is our up-coming partnership with a majorcamera manufacturer shootingtime lapse at a higher resolutionthan anyone has before.The firm hopes holding the patent

    and protecting its intellectual prop-erty will help it raise money forfurther developments for the device which allows people to control cam-eras from the other side of thewo rl d .

    Lobsterinstalledcameras inDawlishafter therailway linewaswashedaway instormsearly thisyear. Itscamerasc a p t u re da constantrecord ofthedamageandsubsequentre b u i l d i n gof the line.

    The videocan beseen ath t t p : / / w w w.networkrail.co.uk/timetables-and-travel/stor m-damage/dawlish/

    Part of the Local World group

    We supply a glossy setting worthy of any awardwinner. From staging and set design, to an assortmentof lighting from LEDs to gobos. We provide all thenecessary services and equipment you would needto make your awards evening the one to remember.

    Staging your Awards doesnthave to cost a fortune...

    Presentation ProductionLive Camera Relay

    PyrotechnicsCall us on: 01684 575832Email us at: enquiries@aneventservices.co.ukVisit us at : www.aneventservices.co.uk

  • EPB-E01-S3

    EPB-E0

    1-S3

    4 We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 5We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 w w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/businessw w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/business

    C o n s u l t a n cy

    ACCOUNTING and con-sultancy network MooreStephens has added to itspresence in the South Westwith the opening of a newoffice in Bristol.The firm has run an office in Bath

    for several years, but four of theregional partners have now moved togrow the Moore Stephens capacity inBristol city centre.The accountancy element of the

    Redcliffe Street office will be headedup by Robert Branch, while theMoore Stephens LLP Corporate Re-covery specialism in the city con-tinues to be led by SteveRamsbottom.Other senior staff at the new office

    will include Mark Chesham as dir-

    ector of indirect tax services, LuciParry and Jake Jukes as senior busi-ness services managers and StephenMaggs as senior personal tax man-a g er.Mr Branch said: Moore Stephens

    has identified a gap in the market forgood quality and competit-ively-priced business advice wherebywe work with the clients in order toachieve their business goals.

    We take a genuine interest in thebusinesses that our clients operateand with them being both owners andmanagers of the business in manycases, speaking to people who see thegood and the bad within many otherbusinesses provides them with a lotof value.

    The new office will also provide astrong capability to offer advice andsupport in restructuring and insolv-e n cy. Mr Ramsbottom said: We look to

    offer practical solutions to the prob-lems facing clients. Our first priority

    is to focus upon recovery and re-integrating businesses into the livetrading arena.

    We only see formal insolvencyprocedures as an option of last resort,and remain proud of our longstand-ing national reputation which con-firms this approach.Moore Stephens was founded in

    London in 1907 and today the UKnetwork has more than 1,500 partnersand staff. The companys philosophyhas been to develop to cater for itscl i e n t s needs whenever required, butnot to grow for the sake of sizea l o n e.The Moore Stephens International

    network now claims to be one of theleading international accounting andconsulting networks outside the BigFo u r of KPMG, Deloitte, Pricewa-terhouseCoopers and Ernst & Young.It comprises 630 offices of memberand correspondent firms in 98 coun-tries worldwide, involving over 20,000partners, principals and staff.

    Office launch Firm sees agap for top quality a d v i ce

    Moore Stephens Bristol management team, from left, Steve Maggs, Luci Parry, Mark Chesham and Robert Branch

    I n n ova t i o n

    Pioneers win patent for advancein time-lapse photography tech

    ACOMPANY that specialisesin time-lapse photographyhas secured a patent for newtechnology that lets peoplecontrol and monitor cam-eras by text message.Queen Square-based Lobster Pic-

    tures created the so-called crab con-trol and monitoring module in 2010.Bosses took the decision to develop

    a new system because they no longerwanted to rely on third-party tech-nolog y.The crab was initially conceived to

    be a power control unit, letting theteam know if there was a power cuton site and acting as a back-up.It then evolved into a remote

    time-lapse controller in its ownright.About two years into development,

    the team realised there was nothingelse like it on the market and appliedfor the patent.The device is part of its Lobster Pot

    camera system, which is used in theTate Modern where it has beenrunning for four years, night andday, allowing people to watch theextension of the gallery as it hap-p e n s.More recently Lobster installed

    cameras in Dawlish after the railwayline was washed away in stormsearly this year. Its cameras capturedthe damage and subsequent recon-struction of the line.The crab units have been used in

    cameras on projects ranging fromnew sports stadia, off shore windfarms and oil platforms, working inenvironments from the Finnishwinter to summer in Dubai.Managing director Robbie Allen

    said Our clients demand long-term,monitored and measured, 100 percent reliability in their time lapseand monitoring systems.

    The crab is the heart of our greatcamera and its now running in over

    Managingd i re c t o rRobbieAllen andtechinicald i re c t o rMichaelMcKelvaneyat LobsterP i c t u re sPhotograph:Dave BettsBRDB20140714A-001_A

    Building projects facedelays over skills gap BUILDING projects in the city arefacing delays of up to three monthsdue to shortages of skills andl a b o u r.The growing economy has seen

    the construction sector pick up, withhousing and commercial projectsthat had been mothballed finallygetting under way. But Tim Harris,director of project management atcommercial property firm JLL inBristol, said there was a lack ofskilled workers to meet demand.He said major projects such as

    the new Southmead Hospital hadabsorbed much of the existingworkforce in jobs from bricklayersand electricians through to sitemanagers and surveyors.Tim (pictur ed) said: During the

    re c e s s i o n ,subcontract-ors andconsultantsbattened downthe hatches,shrinking thesize of theirbusinesses inthe face ofeconomicuncertainty and, tomake it worse, a lot of people haveleft the industry altogether.

    The latest RICS market surveyhighlights that 51 per cent of firmsare concerned that there isinsufficient labour to meet demand.

    Now, although there are signs ofeconomic improvement, smallbusinesses are very reluctant tocommit to expansion, having hadtheir fingers burnt in the past. Andwith the possibility of increasedinterest rates looming, instead theyare cherry-picking jobs.

    This is leaving developers facinga shortfall of labour, resulting indelays to key building projects in theregion of up to three months.The pressures will continue with

    more big projects in the pipeline.Office building has started again inBristol, but there are also plans byUWE to expand and some majornew homes schemes in the pipeline.Tim said: Thankfully the worst is

    over in terms of the economicconditions, which is providingmuch-needed relief. But this changein fortune has its challenges. Thereis an increasing demand forbuildings to be constructed at afaster and faster pace. However, thecurrent skills gap means it is difficultto meet this demand and the cost oflabour is being pushed up so thedevelopers are incurring increasedcosts and delays.

    C o n st r u c t i o nLandlords warnedover air conditioning LANDLORDS are being warnednot to get caught out by changes torules on air conditioning systems.From January next year air

    conditioning systems using theozone-depleting refrigerant R22 willbe banned, meaning it will beagainst the law to maintain them.Christian Crawfurd, a senior

    surveyor from commercial propertyfirm DTZ, said the substance waswidely used before 2004.

    So systems that are more than10 years old will need to beassessed, he said.

    Options available to landlordsinclude replacing the system in itsentirety or using an alternativemodern refrigerant which willnormally involve replacing parts ofthe AC system. There is howeverdebate that the latter may lead topoorer equipment performance andas a result, higher energy costs.He said the matter of who had to

    meet the costs, landlord or tenant,would depend on the terms of thelease.

    We advise considering thisimportant change well in advance oflease events, such as break dates,expiries and rent reviews, and spacedisposal or acquisition, he added.

    L aw

    Managementfirm expanding THE trend towards apartmentliving has led a property managementfirm to expand.Downend-based BNS Property

    Management handles 200 sites in theregion but demand is growing in linewith more apartment blocks havingbeen built.Managing director Andrew

    Simmonds said: So many apartmentblocks were built in the first ten yearsof this century and the maintenancecontracts were either faced with firmswho use sub-contractors or residentsthemselves took responsibility.

    Inevitably people move out andsometimes those who replace themare less enthusiastic about the tasksto be carried out. We have seen amajor expansion of our business aswe have an in-house team ratherthan sub-contractors, which keepscosts down and gives us greatercontrol over the situation.The firm is creating 10 jobs, with

    roles including a maintenancemanager, a property inspector andmaintenance workers.

    Proper ty

    Rovers renew linkswith IT education firm FOOTBALL club Bristol Rovershas renewed its relationship witheducation IT provider Hexakis.The Redcliff firm works with

    schools to improve standards ofteaching through the use oftechnology, as well as supportingRovers education department.Adam Tutton, head of education

    at the club, said: Over the last threeyears the support we have receivedfrom Hexakis has allowed us togreatly enhance our pupils learningexperience.The firm holds seminars and

    workshops at the stadium, the mostrecent being a session for ITteachers earlier this month.Hexakis managing director

    Robbie Smith said: Schools arefacing huge challenges withdelivering the new curriculum.

    Ed u c a t i o n

    Divisions split A BRISTOL design firm working inthe new Bath & North-East Somersetcouncil offices in Keynsham isbreaking up.Aedas is splitting its UK and Hong

    Kong divisions into separate firms.The UK business, which has an officein Clifton Triangle, will become AHR.Chairman Brian Johnson said:

    AHR has a long-standing history ofproducing award-winning designs,something which we will continueinto the future. We are proud of ourregional UK heritage and willcontinue to offer the excellent levelsof services from all our offices.

    D es i g n

    Gavin ThompsonAssistant Editor (Business)gavin.thompson@b-nm.co.uk

    UWE Bristol is building a 50 millionBusiness School as it aims to meet theneeds of employers in the future.The new building, which will also

    house the law school, is part of theu n ive r s i t y s campus redevelopmentplan.Professor Jane Harrington, pro

    vice chancellor and executive dean ofthe Faculty of Business and Law, saidthe university needed to adapt.She said: The business world is

    changing rapidly and we need to edu-cate the next generation of businessleaders in a way that meets the needsof businesses.

    For example, we know that thegreatest growth area is in SMEs, andstudents need a wide range of skills tobe valuable in a small business.

    Our relationship with businessescan help us create placements forstudents to prepare them for theworld of work, so they make a con-tribution from day one.

    We know that employers are look-ing for soft skills, such as team work-ing, project management andcommunication, as well as the know-ledge and analytical skills gainedthrough a university education.

    Our role is to be part of the real

    world of business, to reach out tobusiness and enable them to reach into us. There are huge benefits forbusinesses of working closely with a

    Ed u c a t i o n

    UWE reaching out withbusiness school plans

    modern practice-based universitylike UWE Bristol, and this new build-ing will create the opportunity toenable this to happen by fostering

    informal and formal interaction.She said she wanted to create a

    building where professionals, stu-dents and academics could mingle,with key professional bodies havingbases within the school.She added: Bringing businesses

    into the university will enable themto access a whole range of benefits,from research opportunities to stu-dent placements to consultancywo rk .

    It will also be hugely beneficial forstudents enabling them to have dir-ect contact with the real world ofwork and helping them develop theskills they need to be attractive toe m p l oye r s.

    In addition, what we do in busi-ness and law education can help tofuel the economy and growth. Ournew building can help us to supportthe growth agenda.The university has submitted a

    planning application for the proposedbuilding on its Frenchay campus.

    Rupert JanischBusiness@b-nm.co.uk 150 locations, from Beijing to

    B o l iv i a . Technical director Michael McK-

    elvaney said the UK patent was asignificant landmark for the firm.He said: Being awarded this pat-

    ent proves were an innovator inhigh tech industry.

    An example of this is our up-coming partnership with a majorcamera manufacturer shootingtime lapse at a higher resolutionthan anyone has before.The firm hopes holding the patent

    and protecting its intellectual prop-erty will help it raise money forfurther developments for the device which allows people to control cam-eras from the other side of thewo rl d .

    Lobsterinstalledcameras inDawlishafter therailway linewaswashedaway instormsearly thisyear. Itscamerasc a p t u re da constantrecord ofthedamageandsubsequentre b u i l d i n gof the line.

    The videocan beseen ath t t p : / / w w w.networkrail.co.uk/timetables-and-travel/stor m-damage/dawlish/

    Part of the Local World group

    We supply a glossy setting worthy of any awardwinner. From staging and set design, to an assortmentof lighting from LEDs to gobos. We provide all thenecessary services and equipment you would needto make your awards evening the one to remember.

    Staging your Awards doesnthave to cost a fortune...

    Presentation ProductionLive Camera Relay

    PyrotechnicsCall us on: 01684 575832Email us at: enquiries@aneventservices.co.ukVisit us at : www.aneventservices.co.uk

  • EPB-E01-S3

    EPB-E0

    1-S3

    6 We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 7We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 w w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/businessw w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/business

    The Big Interview

    THERES A L O T T O B E P R O U D ABOUTTheres been an ongoingnarrative since the creditcrunch that banks arentlending to small and mediumsized business. Rupert Janischmeets James Jordan, a manwho argues otherwise. Andhe should know. Hes gotmillions to lend.

    My working dayWake up: 5.45 amWhat do you have for breakfast?Porridge and fruit orscrambled eggson toastWhat timedo you startwork?7.30amWhathappens inyourtypicalworking day?I work alongsidea great team ofpeople to help some greatentrepreneurs to grow and developtheir businesses.What time do you go home? 6.30pmDo you take work home/attendevening functions? I tend to work athome on Fridays (albeit I try not totake work home in the evenings) and Iusually attend one or two eveningfunctions per week in and aroundBristol.

    Vital statistics My downtime

    My perfect weekendWalking on the Moors withmy wife or spending timeon the beaches around theNorth Devon coast.Whats your favouritebook or film or TV show?I enjoy old comedy showslike Dads Army (right),Only Fools and Horses,favourite film would beSaving Private Ryan.What are your hobbies?Running, gym and walking.

    WHILST many busi-nesses have comeand gone, Patter-sons Catering &Cleaning Suppliescontinues to expand and are cel-ebrating their 125th anniversarythis July.The family business started in

    1889 with premises at 74 RedcliffeHill. Today, 125 years later Pat-tersons is a national cateringand cleaning supplier with itsroots still firmly in Bristol.

    Right from the start, we havealways championed honest busi-ness practices, a conscientiousapproach and unbridled ambi-tion. By understanding our cus-tomers need, we have alwaysmade it our mission to deliverquality products with outstand-ing service, said ChairmanChris Patterson.An ethos that can be traced

    right back to Robert Patterson,who in the early 20th centurypersonally delivered ordersevery month as far as Chard byhorse and cart. 125 years laterPattersons now offer next daydelivery throughout the UK andover 12,000 products available toorder on their website, over thephone or in store at their Bristols h ow ro o m .

    Aside from sustaining a prof-itable company, making the localcommunity our business is alsoof paramount importance.Chris Patterson added.The companys steady pres-

    ence in the South West has alsohad a profoundly positive impacton the surrounding community.In a bid to invest in future gen-erations Pattersons are activelyinvolved with Bristol Collegesyouth training schemes andYoung Bristol.

    The key to securing another125 years of success is to ensurewe continue to not only meet theneeds of our customers but toinvest in the community of Bris-tol. Chris Pattersons said.And to demonstrate this, Pat-

    tersons are opening their show-room doors on July 29 to all.From 10am, guests are invited toparticipate in free masterclasseswith world champion cocktailflarer Tom Dyer, and Michelinstarred Chef Josh Eggleton.There will also be 12.5 per cent

    off everything in store, prizesand a whole host of interactiveactivities such as wine tasting, akey cutting service, local food &drink and even a pop up cl e a n -ing surgery. No booking required simply turn up and join in thefun!Pattersons Bristol showroom

    is on Winterstoke Road, Bristol,BS3 2NS, or vost the website:w w w. p a t t e rs o n s. c o. u k , tel: 0117934 1270.

    Celebrating our125th anniversary

    ADVERTISEMENT

    MANY a business has star-ted with a conversationover a glass or wine. Forfriends Tim Harms andJules Lewis, however, itwas particularly appropriate.Jules has been a wine expert for

    famous names including Harveysand Averys for many years, whileTim has made a career in logisticsand operations.At a family barbecue, they dis-

    cussed how the demise of manysmall specialist wine retailers andrise of the supermarket had led tothe choice of wines available be-coming increasingly limited.As they lamented this over a glass

    or two of such a tipple, they wereinspired to do something about it.The result is Bybo, an online wine

    company that aims to offer highquality wines at supermarket pricesby offering a market for lesserknown brands.Jules said: After talking to family

    and friends, we realised that manypeople would actually like to havethe confidence and opportunity totry different wines but when theyvisit the supermarkets the choice isconfusing and limited to big brandsand standard grape varieties such asMerlot or Pinot Grigio, so peopletend to stick to the same wines eachtime they buy.

    There is a world of fabulous wineout there and through Bybo we cangive people easy access to a selectionof the best.He said the website aimed to be

    personal, relaxed and friendly with

    information thats easy to digest.Many of the vineyards used are

    family run and have been producingwine for hundreds of years.Jules said: They are struggling to

    keep some of the old grape varietiesalive, because the wine market issaturated by just a few.Fellow entrepreneur Tim brings

    different skills to the new business,which is based in Abbots Leigh.He said: Unlike Jules, I came to

    this business with only a limitedknowledge, other than knowing Ilike to drink it with family andf r i e n d s.

    So this has been a fascinatingjourney for me learning about thehuge variety of wines available andto learn the wonderful stories andhistory behind those wines.

    It has made drinking a glass ofwine so much more interesting. Iwould have been a classic Bybo

    customer, who wants to trysomething different but doesntknow where to start.Tim said 1.3 billion litres of wine is

    shipped to the UK in tankers andbottled here, whereas the wine soldon Bybo is bottled and labelled atsource. And he uses his logisticsbackground to make sure it getswhere it needs to go.Tim added the pair hope to trans-

    form the wine market in the way thebeer industry has changed.He said: Ten years ago most

    people consumed just a few big namebeers from the mass producers buttoday the beer market has revolu-tionised with 100s of micro breweriesproducing a fantastic range ofb e e r s.

    We want to create the similarsmall revolution in wine choice andgive people the opportunity to try toenjoy something new.

    Ret a i l

    Online wine sellers aim to offertop drinks at supermarket pricesGavin ThompsonAssistant Editor (Business)gavin.thompson@b-nm.co.uk

    A LONG-STANDING holiday com-pany is returning to the high street byopening a ticket shop and travelcentre in Bristol.Bakers Dolphin, founded in 1889,

    once had more than 100 travel shopsacross the South West. But since theWeston-super-Mare firm sold itstravel division to First Choice in 1998it had largely stayed off the highstreet, focusing on its core coach hol-idays business.Now it is opened a store in the

    centre of Bristol to complement onein the Sovereign Centre, Weston.Sales and marketing director

    Amanda Harrington said: The new

    shop is strategically positionedbetween Cabot Circus and Broad-mead in Bristol.

    Although we now take lots of book-ings online there are still a lot ofpeople who want to talk to a traveladviser, discuss special requirementsor have help deciding on what tobook.

    The travel shop will take advant-age of the latest technology so it willbe small and efficient and wired in tothe best deals and late offers and willbe staffed with experienced travels p e c i a l i s t s. Opening the shop has created three

    jobs for travel advisers.

    Bybod i re c t o r sTim Harmsand JulesLewis

    Trave l

    Company returns to high street

    At thenewBakersDolpinstore inQuakersFriars,from left,HeidiM o rg a n ,Nicki RichandJoanneCook

    IF youre an owner of an SME inBristol or Bath and you needmoney to invest into your busi-ness, then James Jordan is agood person to be friends with.Why? Because hes sitting on a pot

    of 100 million perhaps more if allgoes which HSBC wants to lend toSMEs in the area this year.Mr Jordan is the area commercial

    director for HSBC, looking after Bris-tol and Bath, and down into NorthSomerset as far down as Weston-s u p e r- M a re.Aged just 34, the former police

    special constable took up his newpost at the start of this year andmanages a team of 33 at the bankscommercial lending offices inTemple Quay.You suspect HSBC wouldnt have

    made the appointment if James ch a r -acter didnt fit the bill and he saysthat the responsibility of managingthe pot of funding and the team as-sociated with it is something whichcomes naturally to him.James achieved his first manageri-

    al appointment in 2003 at the age ofjust 23, after starting a managementprogramme and degree in financialservices straight out of college at theage of 19.

    My peer group of managers werein their late 40s and early 50s and thepeople I was managing were all a loto l d e r, he said.

    But people always told me I had amaturity beyond my years. When Icome to work and put my suit on, Ijust get into the mindset of JamesJordan the banker, the leader of

    teams of people. The people bit of thejob is the bit that Ive always enjoyed.T hats the bit that I get the buzzf ro m . In April this year HSBC launched a

    growth fund for SMEs in the UK,offering 5.8 billion of funding forbusinesses turning over between500,000 and 30 million.Of that total, 100 million is

    planned to be lent in Bath and Bristolthis year, with more available if thesum is used up.

    I am determined that we will lendin excess of 100 million in this areathis year, said James.

    With HSBCs balance sheetstrength theres no shortage of cashand if we lend 200 million I would bedelighted.James stays away from questions

    over the banking crisis of 2008, in-sisting that the fault lay elsewhereand that HSBC had been a robustperformer throughout.

    We ve maintained stability, hesaid. We never at any point soughtassistance, we maintained balancesheet strength and we have alwaysstood by the clients that we have. Thatreflects the way in which HSBC hasbeen led.

    And in terms of the other majorcriticism aimed at our banks overrecent years, that they were slow tolend to businesses seeking funding,James claimed that the money wasalways available to businesses whichcame calling. Perception was theproblem, he said, not reality.

    I can only talk about HSBC in thewhole debate over banks and banklending but I see myself as an am-bassador and figurehead for this or-ganisation and a key party tosupporting SMEs in our local eco-nomy to grow, he said. The fun-damental way we do that is to lend

    money so that businesses can invest.In 2013 it was very evident to me

    that the demand from small busi-nesses was not there to borrowmoney. The perception is that banksare not lending but if you ask an SMEif they have actually approachedtheir bank, invariably they havent.

    I find so many situations wherewe are supporting SMEs and provid-ing funding its because we are beingproactive and saying to our custom-ers we would like to provide fundingso they can buy new premises or newkit, take on new people or havingadditional working capital support.

    They come back almost in sur-prise, saying they assumed that thebanks werent lending, even thoughwe would have lent them them o n e y. And James now expects to be a

    busy man, signing cheques for am-bitious companies like the four Bris-tol firms who have received fundingto buy their business premises in theweek previous to when we spoke.Business confidence the intan-

    gible, immeasurable barometer of thehealth of our economic future is onthe up, he said: The UK is expected tobe the fastest growing economy in theG7. Confidence is returning and inturn that is leading to a far greaterdemand for bank lending this year,which is great to see.

    In the last week we have seen fourseparate transactions where compan-ies want to buy their premises andt h at s a massive change from wherewe were last year.

    People are buying machinerywhich they havent updated since thefinancial crisis began, taking on staffor just looking at new markets.

    Business confidence has certainlyreturned in the market. It issomething you can never measurebut I think people are far more pos-itive. Weve got some great companiesin the South West and I think theresa hell of a lot to be proud about.

    James Jordan

    I am determinedthat we will lend inexcess of 100million in this areathis year

    Name: James JordanAge: 34Place of birth: S h o re h a m - b y - S e a ,West SussexSchool: The Blue School, Wells,SomersetFirst job: Working in a retailsupermarketHero or inspiration: Winston Churchill

    Jules Lewis

    There is a world offabulous wine out thereand through Bybo wecan give people easyaccess to a selectionof the best

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    6 We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 7We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 w w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/businessw w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/business

    The Big Interview

    THERES A L O T T O B E P R O U D ABOUTTheres been an ongoingnarrative since the creditcrunch that banks arentlending to small and mediumsized business. Rupert Janischmeets James Jordan, a manwho argues otherwise. Andhe should know. Hes gotmillions to lend.

    My working dayWake up: 5.45 amWhat do you have for breakfast?Porridge and fruit orscrambled eggson toastWhat timedo you startwork?7.30amWhathappens inyourtypicalworking day?I work alongsidea great team ofpeople to help some greatentrepreneurs to grow and developtheir businesses.What time do you go home? 6.30pmDo you take work home/attendevening functions? I tend to work athome on Fridays (albeit I try not totake work home in the evenings) and Iusually attend one or two eveningfunctions per week in and aroundBristol.

    Vital statistics My downtime

    My perfect weekendWalking on the Moors withmy wife or spending timeon the beaches around theNorth Devon coast.Whats your favouritebook or film or TV show?I enjoy old comedy showslike Dads Army (right),Only Fools and Horses,favourite film would beSaving Private Ryan.What are your hobbies?Running, gym and walking.

    WHILST many busi-nesses have comeand gone, Patter-sons Catering &Cleaning Suppliescontinues to expand and are cel-ebrating their 125th anniversarythis July.The family business started in

    1889 with premises at 74 RedcliffeHill. Today, 125 years later Pat-tersons is a national cateringand cleaning supplier with itsroots still firmly in Bristol.

    Right from the start, we havealways championed honest busi-ness practices, a conscientiousapproach and unbridled ambi-tion. By understanding our cus-tomers need, we have alwaysmade it our mission to deliverquality products with outstand-ing service, said ChairmanChris Patterson.An ethos that can be traced

    right back to Robert Patterson,who in the early 20th centurypersonally delivered ordersevery month as far as Chard byhorse and cart. 125 years laterPattersons now offer next daydelivery throughout the UK andover 12,000 products available toorder on their website, over thephone or in store at their Bristols h ow ro o m .

    Aside from sustaining a prof-itable company, making the localcommunity our business is alsoof paramount importance.Chris Patterson added.The companys steady pres-

    ence in the South West has alsohad a profoundly positive impacton the surrounding community.In a bid to invest in future gen-erations Pattersons are activelyinvolved with Bristol Collegesyouth training schemes andYoung Bristol.

    The key to securing another125 years of success is to ensurewe continue to not only meet theneeds of our customers but toinvest in the community of Bris-tol. Chris Pattersons said.And to demonstrate this, Pat-

    tersons are opening their show-room doors on July 29 to all.From 10am, guests are invited toparticipate in free masterclasseswith world champion cocktailflarer Tom Dyer, and Michelinstarred Chef Josh Eggleton.There will also be 12.5 per cent

    off everything in store, prizesand a whole host of interactiveactivities such as wine tasting, akey cutting service, local food &drink and even a pop up cl e a n -ing surgery. No booking required simply turn up and join in thefun!Pattersons Bristol showroom

    is on Winterstoke Road, Bristol,BS3 2NS, or vost the website:w w w. p a t t e rs o n s. c o. u k , tel: 0117934 1270.

    Celebrating our125th anniversary

    ADVERTISEMENT

    MANY a business has star-ted with a conversationover a glass or wine. Forfriends Tim Harms andJules Lewis, however, itwas particularly appropriate.Jules has been a wine expert for

    famous names including Harveysand Averys for many years, whileTim has made a career in logisticsand operations.At a family barbecue, they dis-

    cussed how the demise of manysmall specialist wine retailers andrise of the supermarket had led tothe choice of wines available be-coming increasingly limited.As they lamented this over a glass

    or two of such a tipple, they wereinspired to do something about it.The result is Bybo, an online wine

    company that aims to offer highquality wines at supermarket pricesby offering a market for lesserknown brands.Jules said: After talking to family

    and friends, we realised that manypeople would actually like to havethe confidence and opportunity totry different wines but when theyvisit the supermarkets the choice isconfusing and limited to big brandsand standard grape varieties such asMerlot or Pinot Grigio, so peopletend to stick to the same wines eachtime they buy.

    There is a world of fabulous wineout there and through Bybo we cangive people easy access to a selectionof the best.He said the website aimed to be

    personal, relaxed and friendly with

    information thats easy to digest.Many of the vineyards used are

    family run and have been producingwine for hundreds of years.Jules said: They are struggling to

    keep some of the old grape varietiesalive, because the wine market issaturated by just a few.Fellow entrepreneur Tim brings

    different skills to the new business,which is based in Abbots Leigh.He said: Unlike Jules, I came to

    this business with only a limitedknowledge, other than knowing Ilike to drink it with family andf r i e n d s.

    So this has been a fascinatingjourney for me learning about thehuge variety of wines available andto learn the wonderful stories andhistory behind those wines.

    It has made drinking a glass ofwine so much more interesting. Iwould have been a classic Bybo

    customer, who wants to trysomething different but doesntknow where to start.Tim said 1.3 billion litres of wine is

    shipped to the UK in tankers andbottled here, whereas the wine soldon Bybo is bottled and labelled atsource. And he uses his logisticsbackground to make sure it getswhere it needs to go.Tim added the pair hope to trans-

    form the wine market in the way thebeer industry has changed.He said: Ten years ago most

    people consumed just a few big namebeers from the mass producers buttoday the beer market has revolu-tionised with 100s of micro breweriesproducing a fantastic range ofb e e r s.

    We want to create the similarsmall revolution in wine choice andgive people the opportunity to try toenjoy something new.

    Ret a i l

    Online wine sellers aim to offertop drinks at supermarket pricesGavin ThompsonAssistant Editor (Business)gavin.thompson@b-nm.co.uk

    A LONG-STANDING holiday com-pany is returning to the high street byopening a ticket shop and travelcentre in Bristol.Bakers Dolphin, founded in 1889,

    once had more than 100 travel shopsacross the South West. But since theWeston-super-Mare firm sold itstravel division to First Choice in 1998it had largely stayed off the highstreet, focusing on its core coach hol-idays business.Now it is opened a store in the

    centre of Bristol to complement onein the Sovereign Centre, Weston.Sales and marketing director

    Amanda Harrington said: The new

    shop is strategically positionedbetween Cabot Circus and Broad-mead in Bristol.

    Although we now take lots of book-ings online there are still a lot ofpeople who want to talk to a traveladviser, discuss special requirementsor have help deciding on what tobook.

    The travel shop will take advant-age of the latest technology so it willbe small and efficient and wired in tothe best deals and late offers and willbe staffed with experienced travels p e c i a l i s t s. Opening the shop has created three

    jobs for travel advisers.

    Bybod i re c t o r sTim Harmsand JulesLewis

    Trave l

    Company returns to high street

    At thenewBakersDolpinstore inQuakersFriars,from left,HeidiM o rg a n ,Nicki RichandJoanneCook

    IF youre an owner of an SME inBristol or Bath and you needmoney to invest into your busi-ness, then James Jordan is agood person to be friends with.Why? Because hes sitting on a pot

    of 100 million perhaps more if allgoes which HSBC wants to lend toSMEs in the area this year.Mr Jordan is the area commercial

    director for HSBC, looking after Bris-tol and Bath, and down into NorthSomerset as far down as Weston-s u p e r- M a re.Aged just 34, the former police

    special constable took up his newpost at the start of this year andmanages a team of 33 at the bankscommercial lending offices inTemple Quay.You suspect HSBC wouldnt have

    made the appointment if James ch a r -acter didnt fit the bill and he saysthat the responsibility of managingthe pot of funding and the team as-sociated with it is something whichcomes naturally to him.James achieved his first manageri-

    al appointment in 2003 at the age ofjust 23, after starting a managementprogramme and degree in financialservices straight out of college at theage of 19.

    My peer group of managers werein their late 40s and early 50s and thepeople I was managing were all a loto l d e r, he said.

    But people always told me I had amaturity beyond my years. When Icome to work and put my suit on, Ijust get into the mindset of JamesJordan the banker, the leader of

    teams of people. The people bit of thejob is the bit that Ive always enjoyed.T hats the bit that I get the buzzf ro m . In April this year HSBC launched a

    growth fund for SMEs in the UK,offering 5.8 billion of funding forbusinesses turning over between500,000 and 30 million.Of that total, 100 million is

    planned to be lent in Bath and Bristolthis year, with more available if thesum is used up.

    I am determined that we will lendin excess of 100 million in this areathis year, said James.

    With HSBCs balance sheetstrength theres no shortage of cashand if we lend 200 million I would bedelighted.James stays away from questions

    over the banking crisis of 2008, in-sisting that the fault lay elsewhereand that HSBC had been a robustperformer throughout.

    We ve maintained stability, hesaid. We never at any point soughtassistance, we maintained balancesheet strength and we have alwaysstood by the clients that we have. Thatreflects the way in which HSBC hasbeen led.

    And in terms of the other majorcriticism aimed at our banks overrecent years, that they were slow tolend to businesses seeking funding,James claimed that the money wasalways available to businesses whichcame calling. Perception was theproblem, he said, not reality.

    I can only talk about HSBC in thewhole debate over banks and banklending but I see myself as an am-bassador and figurehead for this or-ganisation and a key party tosupporting SMEs in our local eco-nomy to grow, he said. The fun-damental way we do that is to lend

    money so that businesses can invest.In 2013 it was very evident to me

    that the demand from small busi-nesses was not there to borrowmoney. The perception is that banksare not lending but if you ask an SMEif they have actually approachedtheir bank, invariably they havent.

    I find so many situations wherewe are supporting SMEs and provid-ing funding its because we are beingproactive and saying to our custom-ers we would like to provide fundingso they can buy new premises or newkit, take on new people or havingadditional working capital support.

    They come back almost in sur-prise, saying they assumed that thebanks werent lending, even thoughwe would have lent them them o n e y. And James now expects to be a

    busy man, signing cheques for am-bitious companies like the four Bris-tol firms who have received fundingto buy their business premises in theweek previous to when we spoke.Business confidence the intan-

    gible, immeasurable barometer of thehealth of our economic future is onthe up, he said: The UK is expected tobe the fastest growing economy in theG7. Confidence is returning and inturn that is leading to a far greaterdemand for bank lending this year,which is great to see.

    In the last week we have seen fourseparate transactions where compan-ies want to buy their premises andt h at s a massive change from wherewe were last year.

    People are buying machinerywhich they havent updated since thefinancial crisis began, taking on staffor just looking at new markets.

    Business confidence has certainlyreturned in the market. It issomething you can never measurebut I think people are far more pos-itive. Weve got some great companiesin the South West and I think theresa hell of a lot to be proud about.

    James Jordan

    I am determinedthat we will lend inexcess of 100million in this areathis year

    Name: James JordanAge: 34Place of birth: S h o re h a m - b y - S e a ,West SussexSchool: The Blue School, Wells,SomersetFirst job: Working in a retailsupermarketHero or inspiration: Winston Churchill

    Jules Lewis

    There is a world offabulous wine out thereand through Bybo wecan give people easyaccess to a selectionof the best

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    8 We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 9We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 w w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/businessw w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/business

    ONCE a sleepy town sittingon the Bristol Channel,Portishead has changed inthe last 20 years almost bey-ond recognition. Now thetown, which has a population ofabout 22,000, is regularly quoted asone of the fastest growing in Bri-tain.Much of that growth has been

    around the Marina. House builderCrest Nicholson saw the potential inan unloved brown-field site. Thegrowing demand for waterfront liv-ing coupled with the desire of thou-sands of families to move out of thecity in search of a different lifestyle,better schools, quieter roads and thelike added up to a successful for-mula.Previously home to a nail factory

    and power station, work began to

    Those people have brought withthem a number of leisure and retailbusinesses too. Theres thesought-after Waitrose, Bottelinosrestaurant and the striking Hall &Woodhouse pub made out of old ship-ping containers.The impact has had a ripple effect

    that has lifted the town centre too.The White Lion pub has been trans-formed through a 1.6 million refitinto a buzzing Mezze restaurant andbar, the fast-growing trendy Loun-gers chain has opened ImperoLounge, plus theres a new tapasb a r.The marina has become a destin-

    ation for visitors, a popular spot for aSunday afternoon stroll.Tim said: People not only flock to

    the marina for walks, to fish, enjoythe boats and various water sports

    but also the nearby Lake Grounds hasseen an increase in visitors, the leis-ure centre is thriving and the openair pool has been rejuvenated if notdirectly linked, Im quite sure that allof these things have been positivelyinfluenced by a ripple effect fromPort Marine.The growth of Portishead looks set

    to continue. Perhaps the biggest de-velopment is the expected reopeningof the rail line to Bristol in 2019.North Somerset Council is working

    with its sister authorities in Bristol,South Gloucestershire and Bath andNorth East Somerset to push forwardthe MetroWest plan for a suburbanrail network running regular ser-vices around the Greater Bristolarea. Running trains from Portisheadinvolves laying just a few miles oftrack but could take thousands of

    Focus on start-ups | Sponsored by THEME SPONSORS NAME HERE.

    Portishead is one of thefastest growing towns inBritain and will soon beconnected to Bristol byrail as well as road. Butcan it be more thanjust a dormitory forcommuters? GavinThompson re p o r t s

    redevelop Portisheads dockside in1998. Sixteen years on, Crest Nich-olson is launching its final phase ofdevelopment at Port Marine, calledNinety4 on the Estuary.Tim Beale, the firms South West

    managing director, said: We are ex-ceptionally proud of our involvementwith Port Marine. Its an exemplar ofour far-reaching desire to build sus-tainable communities and create life-styles rather than just housingd eve l o p m e n t s.

    As one half of Portishead QuaysConsortium, we have been fortunateenough to have one of the biggestinfluences on Port Marine. We havedeveloped more than one millionsquare feet of land and provided Port-ishead with a cosmopolitan suburbwhich boasts an eclectic mix of con-temporary houses, villas and apart-m e n t s.

    Since our first completion in 2000we have provided over 1,200 homesfor Portishead and welcomed a goodmix of local residents and peoplefrom outside the area to Port Marinebut the one thing they all have incommon is the feeling they get whenthey move here. Ive lost count of theamount of times weve been told itfeels like youre on holiday everyd ay . What a fantastic thing to sayabout where you live.

    IT business Chorus is growing sofast it needs to move to newoffices. But the firm plans to stay inPortishead because of all thebenefits the location offers.Business development director

    Anthony Sherry said: We want tocontinue expanding so we candevelop and add new services forour customers.

    Our staff are very happy here inPortishead. It has fantasticmotorway links, allowing quickaccess to clients and for clients tovisit us from around the UK.

    And it means we avoid the

    commute through central Bristol.She said the town was growing

    as a place for business, with anumber of companies moving intothe business park where the firm iscurrently based.Chorus was founded in 1999 with

    two employees as an IT supportcompany, helping businesses withtheir Microsoft software.Now the firm, which employs 40

    people, offers much more,including graphic design, customer

    relationship management, datamanagement, e-commerce,disaster recovery, websitedevelopment and more.It aims to provide specialist skills

    that firms would not always be ableto afford to have in-house and tobe the IT department for many ofits customers.Its relationship with Microsoft

    remains as the firm has goldpartner status in several areas,including customer relationshipmanagement.Customers range from charities

    to engineering firms, property

    Chorus sings the praises of Portishead as it plans for office switchCase study

    CABLES have been used to relayinformation for decades but now they arebeing used to listen too.Technology developed in Portishead

    turns standard fibre optic cables into anarray of thousands of virtual microphonesalong the length of the cable.It is being used to protect vital

    infrastructure such as oil pipelines incountries including Iraq, China andColombia.And it allows the customer to hear

    what is happening in the area usingadvanced sonar techniques.Customers can use real-time data to

    increase security, for example.The company behind it, OptaSense,

    has this week been presented with theQueens Award for Innovation.Managing director Magnus

    McEwen-King said: We are delighted tobe recognised with two Queens Awardswhich are testament to the hard workand commitment of all those who workfor and with OptaSense.

    We believe this technology willtransform the way global energy andtransport industries move product andpeople around more efficiently ands a f e l y.

    We are already providing the ownersof oil wells, pipelines, roads, railways and

    Leading the way with l i ste n i n g ca b l e

    Case study

    PicsMondayPiccode

    borders with the ability to monitor everymeter of these assets.Back in 2005, five entrepreneurs

    working from home developing afibre-optic sensing system. It took offand was being used in the US by the endof the year, with the US Department ofDefence an early adopter.When they needed an office in 2008,

    those chose Portishead for its goodmotorway links and availability ofqualified staff.OptaSense, which is a subsidiary of

    QinetiQ, bought the business in 2010.The firm has 120 staff; about 20 of themremain in Portishead working on researchand design.Lady Gass, the Lord Lieutenant of

    Somerset, presented the Queens Awardon Monday. It comes just days after thefirms Dorset base was given anotherQueens Award, this time for internationaltrade.And Magnus believes the system has

    potential to have more uses in future.He said fibre optic cables were already

    in place next to most of the worldscritical arteries and the by converting thethem into a distributed sensor network itcould build what he calls the Earthsnervous system.We ll keep our ears to the ground.

    Focus on Portishead

    SPREADING RIPPLES OF SUCCESS AROUND MARINA

    commuters off the roads.The service would take 17 minutes to get to

    Bristol, a journey that can take an hour by carin rush hour. A consultation on where thenew station should be closes on July 28 andthe site should be chosen later this year.There is no doubt reopening the line that

    closed in 1964 will only increase the townsdesirability as a place to live.But that could also be the challenge for

    Portishead. Can it be more than just a dorm-itory for Bristol commuters?There are jobs here. Avon and Somerset

    Constabulary has its HQ in the town and isone of the bigger employers. There are pro-fessional roles in the town. Property con-sultancy Capita has an office here, forexample, and IT solutions firm Chorus em-ploys about 40 people. There are other suchbusinesses too but nowhere near the depth ofBristol or even Weston-super-Mare or Taun-ton.

    The improving transport links could be anopportunity for more businesses to set uphere, in easy reach of Bristol. But only if theycan find space.Jono Lipfriend, from commercial property

    specialist Colliers International, said: Por t-ishead has gone through massive change inthe past 10 years and has been quoted as oneof the fastest growing towns in the UK, withhousing development growing around 40 percent.

    Clearly there is a need for high qualityoffice accommodation close to the town inorder to help reduce the large numbers ofpeople forced to make the daily commute toBristol.Jono has been marketing a two-storey office

    site at Portis Fields, two miles off Junction 19,but doesnt expect it to be available for long.He said: Businesses looking for quality,

    contemporary accommodation are aware it isin increasingly short supply.

    management firms to trainingorganisations, all of which need theright technology to meet theirbusiness needs.Where the firm sees itself as

    having an edge in a highlycompetitive sector is in its size big enough to offer a completeservice but still flexible and withoutthe bigger overheads a largeroutsourcing company would have.And the need for bigger offices is

    no surprise when you look at thefigures. Chorus grew its turnover30 per cent in the 18 months toApril 2014, to 1.7 million annually.

    Port Marine at Portishead

    The team from Chorus in Portishead

    Jono Lipfriend, of ColliersInternational

    Portishead has gonethrough massive changein the past 10 years andhas been quoted as oneof the fastest growingtowns in the UK

    Guests and staff at OptaSense Photo: Barbara Evripidou BRBE20140721B-2

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    8 We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 9We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 w w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/businessw w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/business

    ONCE a sleepy town sittingon the Bristol Channel,Portishead has changed inthe last 20 years almost bey-ond recognition. Now thetown, which has a population ofabout 22,000, is regularly quoted asone of the fastest growing in Bri-tain.Much of that growth has been

    around the Marina. House builderCrest Nicholson saw the potential inan unloved brown-field site. Thegrowing demand for waterfront liv-ing coupled with the desire of thou-sands of families to move out of thecity in search of a different lifestyle,better schools, quieter roads and thelike added up to a successful for-mula.Previously home to a nail factory

    and power station, work began to

    Those people have brought withthem a number of leisure and retailbusinesses too. Theres thesought-after Waitrose, Bottelinosrestaurant and the striking Hall &Woodhouse pub made out of old ship-ping containers.The impact has had a ripple effect

    that has lifted the town centre too.The White Lion pub has been trans-formed through a 1.6 million refitinto a buzzing Mezze restaurant andbar, the fast-growing trendy Loun-gers chain has opened ImperoLounge, plus theres a new tapasb a r.The marina has become a destin-

    ation for visitors, a popular spot for aSunday afternoon stroll.Tim said: People not only flock to

    the marina for walks, to fish, enjoythe boats and various water sports

    but also the nearby Lake Grounds hasseen an increase in visitors, the leis-ure centre is thriving and the openair pool has been rejuvenated if notdirectly linked, Im quite sure that allof these things have been positivelyinfluenced by a ripple effect fromPort Marine.The growth of Portishead looks set

    to continue. Perhaps the biggest de-velopment is the expected reopeningof the rail line to Bristol in 2019.North Somerset Council is working

    with its sister authorities in Bristol,South Gloucestershire and Bath andNorth East Somerset to push forwardthe MetroWest plan for a suburbanrail network running regular ser-vices around the Greater Bristolarea. Running trains from Portisheadinvolves laying just a few miles oftrack but could take thousands of

    Focus on start-ups | Sponsored by THEME SPONSORS NAME HERE.

    Portishead is one of thefastest growing towns inBritain and will soon beconnected to Bristol byrail as well as road. Butcan it be more thanjust a dormitory forcommuters? GavinThompson re p o r t s

    redevelop Portisheads dockside in1998. Sixteen years on, Crest Nich-olson is launching its final phase ofdevelopment at Port Marine, calledNinety4 on the Estuary.Tim Beale, the firms South West

    managing director, said: We are ex-ceptionally proud of our involvementwith Port Marine. Its an exemplar ofour far-reaching desire to build sus-tainable communities and create life-styles rather than just housingd eve l o p m e n t s.

    As one half of Portishead QuaysConsortium, we have been fortunateenough to have one of the biggestinfluences on Port Marine. We havedeveloped more than one millionsquare feet of land and provided Port-ishead with a cosmopolitan suburbwhich boasts an eclectic mix of con-temporary houses, villas and apart-m e n t s.

    Since our first completion in 2000we have provided over 1,200 homesfor Portishead and welcomed a goodmix of local residents and peoplefrom outside the area to Port Marinebut the one thing they all have incommon is the feeling they get whenthey move here. Ive lost count of theamount of times weve been told itfeels like youre on holiday everyd ay . What a fantastic thing to sayabout where you live.

    IT business Chorus is growing sofast it needs to move to newoffices. But the firm plans to stay inPortishead because of all thebenefits the location offers.Business development director

    Anthony Sherry said: We want tocontinue expanding so we candevelop and add new services forour customers.

    Our staff are very happy here inPortishead. It has fantasticmotorway links, allowing quickaccess to clients and for clients tovisit us from around the UK.

    And it means we avoid the

    commute through central Bristol.She said the town was growing

    as a place for business, with anumber of companies moving intothe business park where the firm iscurrently based.Chorus was founded in 1999 with

    two employees as an IT supportcompany, helping businesses withtheir Microsoft software.Now the firm, which employs 40

    people, offers much more,including graphic design, customer

    relationship management, datamanagement, e-commerce,disaster recovery, websitedevelopment and more.It aims to provide specialist skills

    that firms would not always be ableto afford to have in-house and tobe the IT department for many ofits customers.Its relationship with Microsoft

    remains as the firm has goldpartner status in several areas,including customer relationshipmanagement.Customers range from charities

    to engineering firms, property

    Chorus sings the praises of Portishead as it plans for office switchCase study

    CABLES have been used to relayinformation for decades but now they arebeing used to listen too.Technology developed in Portishead

    turns standard fibre optic cables into anarray of thousands of virtual microphonesalong the length of the cable.It is being used to protect vital

    infrastructure such as oil pipelines incountries including Iraq, China andColombia.And it allows the customer to hear

    what is happening in the area usingadvanced sonar techniques.Customers can use real-time data to

    increase security, for example.The company behind it, OptaSense,

    has this week been presented with theQueens Award for Innovation.Managing director Magnus

    McEwen-King said: We are delighted tobe recognised with two Queens Awardswhich are testament to the hard workand commitment of all those who workfor and with OptaSense.

    We believe this technology willtransform the way global energy andtransport industries move product andpeople around more efficiently ands a f e l y.

    We are already providing the ownersof oil wells, pipelines, roads, railways and

    Leading the way with l i ste n i n g ca b l e

    Case study

    PicsMondayPiccode

    borders with the ability to monitor everymeter of these assets.Back in 2005, five entrepreneurs

    working from home developing afibre-optic sensing system. It took offand was being used in the US by the endof the year, with the US Department ofDefence an early adopter.When they needed an office in 2008,

    those chose Portishead for its goodmotorway links and availability ofqualified staff.OptaSense, which is a subsidiary of

    QinetiQ, bought the business in 2010.The firm has 120 staff; about 20 of themremain in Portishead working on researchand design.Lady Gass, the Lord Lieutenant of

    Somerset, presented the Queens Awardon Monday. It comes just days after thefirms Dorset base was given anotherQueens Award, this time for internationaltrade.And Magnus believes the system has

    potential to have more uses in future.He said fibre optic cables were already

    in place next to most of the worldscritical arteries and the by converting thethem into a distributed sensor network itcould build what he calls the Earthsnervous system.We ll keep our ears to the ground.

    Focus on Portishead

    SPREADING RIPPLES OF SUCCESS AROUND MARINA

    commuters off the roads.The service would take 17 minutes to get to

    Bristol, a journey that can take an hour by carin rush hour. A consultation on where thenew station should be closes on July 28 andthe site should be chosen later this year.There is no doubt reopening the line that

    closed in 1964 will only increase the townsdesirability as a place to live.But that could also be the challenge for

    Portishead. Can it be more than just a dorm-itory for Bristol commuters?There are jobs here. Avon and Somerset

    Constabulary has its HQ in the town and isone of the bigger employers. There are pro-fessional roles in the town. Property con-sultancy Capita has an office here, forexample, and IT solutions firm Chorus em-ploys about 40 people. There are other suchbusinesses too but nowhere near the depth ofBristol or even Weston-super-Mare or Taun-ton.

    The improving transport links could be anopportunity for more businesses to set uphere, in easy reach of Bristol. But only if theycan find space.Jono Lipfriend, from commercial property

    specialist Colliers International, said: Por t-ishead has gone through massive change inthe past 10 years and has been quoted as oneof the fastest growing towns in the UK, withhousing development growing around 40 percent.

    Clearly there is a need for high qualityoffice accommodation close to the town inorder to help reduce the large numbers ofpeople forced to make the daily commute toBristol.Jono has been marketing a two-storey office

    site at Portis Fields, two miles off Junction 19,but doesnt expect it to be available for long.He said: Businesses looking for quality,

    contemporary accommodation are aware it isin increasingly short supply.

    management firms to trainingorganisations, all of which need theright technology to meet theirbusiness needs.Where the firm sees itself as

    having an edge in a highlycompetitive sector is in its size big enough to offer a completeservice but still flexible and withoutthe bigger overheads a largeroutsourcing company would have.And the need for bigger offices is

    no surprise when you look at thefigures. Chorus grew its turnover30 per cent in the 18 months toApril 2014, to 1.7 million annually.

    Port Marine at Portishead

    The team from Chorus in Portishead

    Jono Lipfriend, of ColliersInternational

    Portishead has gonethrough massive changein the past 10 years andhas been quoted as oneof the fastest growingtowns in the UK

    Guests and staff at OptaSense Photo: Barbara Evripidou BRBE20140721B-2

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    10 We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 11We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 w w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/businessw w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/business

    In pictures B r i sto l s business community out and aboutSouth West Contact Centre Awards Farnborough International Airshow

    Business diary

    Email your business events togavin.thompson@b-nm.co.uk.Events are sometimescancelled without us beingnotified so please check withorganisers before travelling.

    We d n e s d a y @ 6 : Institute ofDirectors informal networking atthe Radisson Blu Hotel 6-8pm,Wednesday, July 23. Nonmembers welcome. Free but toregister call 0117 3707785 oremail iod.southwest@iod.com.

    Get Growing workshop:Showing how to get morestrategic about growing yoursmall business in a half-dayworkshop. Part of the GreatBritish Business Roadshow runby freeAgent in association withthe Department for Business,Innovation and Skills. From9.30am at the Engine Shed,Temple Meads, Thursday, July24.

    Neighbourly launch: Socialnetwork for businesses with asocial conscience Neighbourlywill hold a launch event at theEngine Shed on Thursday, July24, 5pm-7.30pm.

    Meet the minister: SouthGloucestershire FSB hosts aQ&A event with PensionsMinister and local MP SteveWebb. Questions must beemailed in advance. Wednesday,July 30, 7pn-9pm, at Aztec WestHotel, BS32 4TS.

    Summer party: MoonConsulting holds its summerparty at the Old Fire Station, Pill,on Thursday, July 31 from6-8.30pm. The evening willfeature a display of elite AstonMartin and Bentley cars courtesyof local luxury car dealers HROwen Cheltenham and twoclassic Austin Healey race cars.Fundraising for the Fire FightersC h a r i t y.

    We d n e s d a y @ 6 : Institute ofDirectors informal networking atthe Radisson Blu Hotel 6-8pm,Wednesday, August 6. Nonmembers welcome. Free but toregister call 0117 3707785 oremail iod.southwest@iod.com.

    Bristol Connected: The BristolPosts popular businessnetworking event takes place athe Hilton Garden Inn, TempleWay, from 6pm-8pm onThursday, August 14. A chancefor SMEs to network as well asmeet the Post team. John Hirstfrom Destination Bristol will beamong the speakers. To sign upgo to eventbrite or scan the QRcode below.

    We d n e s d a y @ 6 : Institute ofDirectors informal networking atthe Radisson Blu Hotel 6-8pm,Wednesday, August 20. Nonmembers welcome. Free but toregister call 0117 3707785 oremail iod.southwest@iod.com.

    SALES took off for Airbus as ithailed its best every perform-ance at the biennial Farnbor-ough International Airshow.The company, which employs4,000 people at Filton, started theweek by announcing plans to buildnew A330 800 and 900 models withmore fuel efficient engines.That was soon followed by deals

    mainly from plane leasing firms,committing to 121 of the new planes.All told, the firm logged new busi-

    ness for 496 aircraft, with itsbest-selling A320 family leading theway with 363 orders and commit-ments announced. The biggest wasSMBC Aviation Capitals order for110 A320 neo and five A320 ceo.Airbus showed off its newest plane,

    the A350XWB, signing a memor-andum of understanding from AirMauritius for six of them.The firm will also benefit from

    152 million of Government invest-ment in the sector announced byDeputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg. Itwill be spent on projects such asdeveloping lighter wings and aircraftframes through the National Com-posites Centre in Emersons Green.Bristol was well represented by

    other companies too, including bignames GKN and Rolls-Royce, as wellas smaller firms too.The West of England Aerospace

    Forum had a stand featuring 16 SMEsshowcasing their products.Invest Bristol & Bath sent a del-

    egation looking to build relation-ships. Its sector champion BarryWarburton said he must have walkedfive miles a day as he prowled thestands making contacts.He said: I am confident as a result

    of strong foundations laid in recentyears Bristol is getting a good repu-tation as a place for investment.He said his talks had been not just

    with the aerospace sector but alsomarine power firms who see poten-tial in the same skills and technologybeing applied in their sector too.

    Now its about following it up, hesaid. T heres a lot of work ahead.

    A group of Airbus apprentices and graduates, some from Filton, in front of the A350 XWB with Thierry Baril, centre,chief HR officer, Airbus Group, and Mark Stewart, right, Filton site manager and HR director

    Apprentices from Airbus inside the A350 WXB

    Vince Cable, Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, talkingto Airbus President and CEO Fabrice Bregier

    The A400M in flight. Its wings are made in Filton

    The C295 in flight

    The E-FAN Airbus Group Innovations battery powered plane

    CALL centre workers from across the regioncelebrated their successes at the South WestContact Centre Awards, which aim to recog-nise the best workers and good service withinthe sector.Jane Thomas, managing director of the South West

    Contact Centre Forum, told the audience: The growthand success of the industry within the last year hassurpassed that of any other and I am proud to beinvolved in such a dedicated and thriving sector.Winners on the night including Bristol News &

    Medias own Jonny Snell, who took the trainer of yearprize for his work developing the telesales team here.Other winners included: Contact Centre of the Year: Screwfix, with Curohighly commended Performance and Quality award: Winners Serco Best Shared Services initiative, sponsored by Nex-idia, went to SouthWest One Best People Engagement, sponsored by TherapySolutions, was Imperial Tobacco Best Application of Technology, sponsored by In-teractive Intelligence, was LV= Bristol Best Outsourced Contact Centre was won by CaptiaLife and Pensions, with Carpeo highly commended. Support manager of the Year went jointly to JuliaWhiteley (Jaywing) and Helen Bennett (InterCallEurope) with Alan Hughes of Panacea Finance highlycommended.Katy Forsyth, director of ceremony sponsors Red

    Contact Centres, said: The South West is a greatregion for contact centres which employs highly tal-ented and passionate individuals.

    The A380 coming in to land

    The A350 in flight

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    10 We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 11We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014 w w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/businessw w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/business

    In pictures B r i sto l s business community out and aboutSouth West Contact Centre Awards Farnborough International Airshow

    Business diary

    Email your business events togavin.thompson@b-nm.co.uk.Events are sometimescancelled without us beingnotified so please check withorganisers before travelling.

    We d n e s d a y @ 6 : Institute ofDirectors informal networking atthe Radisson Blu Hotel 6-8pm,Wednesday, July 23. Nonmembers welcome. Free but toregister call 0117 3707785 oremail iod.southwest@iod.com.

    Get Growing workshop:Showing how to get morestrategic about growing yoursmall business in a half-dayworkshop. Part of the GreatBritish Business Roadshow runby freeAgent in association withthe Department for Business,Innovation and Skills. From9.30am at the Engine Shed,Temple Meads, Thursday, July24.

    Neighbourly launch: Socialnetwork for businesses with asocial conscience Neighbourlywill hold a launch event at theEngine Shed on Thursday, July24, 5pm-7.30pm.

    Meet the minister: SouthGloucestershire FSB hosts aQ&A event with PensionsMinister and local MP SteveWebb. Questions must beemailed in advance. Wednesday,July 30, 7pn-9pm, at Aztec WestHotel, BS32 4TS.

    Summer party: MoonConsulting holds its summerparty at the Old Fire Station, Pill,on Thursday, July 31 from6-8.30pm. The evening willfeature a display of elite AstonMartin and Bentley cars courtesyof local luxury car dealers HROwen Cheltenham and twoclassic Austin Healey race cars.Fundraising for the Fire FightersC h a r i t y.

    We d n e s d a y @ 6 : Institute ofDirectors informal networking atthe Radisson Blu Hotel 6-8pm,Wednesday, August 6. Nonmembers welcome. Free but toregister call 0117 3707785 oremail iod.southwest@iod.com.

    Bristol Connected: The BristolPosts popular businessnetworking event takes place athe Hilton Garden Inn, TempleWay, from 6pm-8pm onThursday, August 14. A chancefor SMEs to network as well asmeet the Post team. John Hirstfrom Destination Bristol will beamong the speakers. To sign upgo to eventbrite or scan the QRcode below.

    We d n e s d a y @ 6 : Institute ofDirectors informal networking atthe Radisson Blu Hotel 6-8pm,Wednesday, August 20. Nonmembers welcome. Free but toregister call 0117 3707785 oremail iod.southwest@iod.com.

    SALES took off for Airbus as ithailed its best every perform-ance at the biennial Farnbor-ough International Airshow.The company, which employs4,000 people at Filton, started theweek by announcing plans to buildnew A330 800 and 900 models withmore fuel efficient engines.That was soon followed by deals

    mainly from plane leasing firms,committing to 121 of the new planes.All told, the firm logged new busi-

    ness for 496 aircraft, with itsbest-selling A320 family leading theway with 363 orders and commit-ments announced. The biggest wasSMBC Aviation Capitals order for110 A320 neo and five A320 ceo.Airbus showed off its newest plane,

    the A350XWB, signing a memor-andum of understanding from AirMauritius for six of them.The firm will also benefit from

    152 million of Government invest-ment in the sector announced byDeputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg. Itwill be spent on projects such asdeveloping lighter wings and aircraftframes through the National Com-posites Centre in Emersons Green.Bristol was well represented by

    other companies too, including bignames GKN and Rolls-Royce, as wellas smaller firms too.The West of England Aerospace

    Forum had a stand featuring 16 SMEsshowcasing their products.Invest Bristol & Bath sent a del-

    egation looking to build relation-ships. Its sector champion BarryWarburton said he must have walkedfive miles a day as he prowled thestands making contacts.He said: I am confident as a result

    of strong foundations laid in recentyears Bristol is getting a good repu-tation as a place for investment.He said his talks had been not just

    with the aerospace sector but alsomarine power firms who see poten-tial in the same skills and technologybeing applied in their sector too.

    Now its about following it up, hesaid. T heres a lot of work ahead.

    A group of Airbus apprentices and graduates, some from Filton, in front of the A350 XWB with Thierry Baril, centre,chief HR officer, Airbus Group, and Mark Stewart, right, Filton site manager and HR director

    Apprentices from Airbus inside the A350 WXB

    Vince Cable, Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, talkingto Airbus President and CEO Fabrice Bregier

    The A400M in flight. Its wings are made in Filton

    The C295 in flight

    The E-FAN Airbus Group Innovations battery powered plane

    CALL centre workers from across the regioncelebrated their successes at the South WestContact Centre Awards, which aim to recog-nise the best workers and good service withinthe sector.Jane Thomas, managing director of the South West

    Contact Centre Forum, told the audience: The growthand success of the industry within the last year hassurpassed that of any other and I am proud to beinvolved in such a dedicated and thriving sector.Winners on the night including Bristol News &

    Medias own Jonny Snell, who took the trainer of yearprize for his work developing the telesales team here.Other winners included: Contact Centre of the Year: Screwfix, with Curohighly commended Performance and Quality award: Winners Serco Best Shared Services initiative, sponsored by Nex-idia, went to SouthWest One Best People Engagement, sponsored by TherapySolutions, was Imperial Tobacco Best Application of Technology, sponsored by In-teractive Intelligence, was LV= Bristol Best Outsourced Contact Centre was won by CaptiaLife and Pensions, with Carpeo highly commended. Support manager of the Year went jointly to JuliaWhiteley (Jaywing) and Helen Bennett (InterCallEurope) with Alan Hughes of Panacea Finance highlycommended.Katy Forsyth, director of ceremony sponsors Red

    Contact Centres, said: The South West is a greatregion for contact centres which employs highly tal-ented and passionate individuals.

    The A380 coming in to land

    The A350 in flight

  • EPB-E0

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    12 We d n e s d a y, July 23, 2014w w w. b r i s t o l p o s t .co.uk/business

    The back pageP l a ces More signs of the Bristol propertymarket gently heating up this week.Alder King and JLL have secured afurther letting at Whitefriars, alandmark city centre office.The University Hospitals Bristol

    NHS Foundation Trust has taken the5,143 sq ft, doubling its space, on a10-year lease.The office was refurbished last

    year by investment firm ownersTopland and 26,569 sq ft has beenlet in the last 12 months.Ben Ryan, asset manager at

    Topland said: We are delighted tohave leased further space in thebuilding to take us up to 80 per centlet following our refurbishmentstrategy, which we will now roll outto the remaining five availablesuites. When we acquired thebuilding two years ago, it was only60 per cent let.

    Meanwhile brick claddingsupplier Eurobrick Systems hasleased a 12,528 sq ft industrial siteat Newbridge Trading Estate on a10-year lease, moving from its oldBrislington base.At the same time DS Smith

    Corrugated Packaging Ltd,represented by Granby Martin Vine,has taken 45,660 sq ft of space atthe estate on a 15-year lease.DTZ was involved in both deals

    and Phil Cranstone from itsindustrial agency team said: Theexpansion of two locally basedbusinesses is also another positivestory for the Bristol economy.

    Pe o p l e When it comes to promotion, youcant judge people on their looks.But beauty therapist Amy Westonmay have been judged on howshes helped her customers to lookgood.The 24-year-old, who studied at

    Weston College, has been madespa manager at the DoubleTree byHilton, Cadbury House, inC o n g re s b u r y.Amy, who worked on cruise ships

    after college, said: I feel so proudof what I have accomplished so farand Im really excited to put all myenergy and passion into making thespa the best it can be. Weve alsogot a really great team which makesmy job a lot easier!

    Another local firm is spicing up itssenior team. Bart Spices hasappointed Steve Newiss, chiefcustomer officer at BurtonsBiscuits, as a non-executived i re c t o r.Steve, who spent 20 years at

    Kraft Foods, said he hoped to helpthe business push on to the nextlevel.Chief executive David Collard

    added: Steves experience andreputation in the industry not only inthe UK but globally will beinvaluable over the next few yearsas Bart accelerates its growth bothorganically and throughacquisition.

    Proud moment hopefully points way to future

    THAT the recent Bristol andBath Apprentice of the YearAward went to Luke Naish, aconstruction apprentice, wasa proud moment for the in-dustry. To know that gifted, talentedand driven young people like Luke arecoming into construction is reward-ing. As a sector we compete with somany others to attract the brightestand best out there, and its no meanf e at .Construction sadly still suffers

    from a negative and dated reputation,scattered with stereotypes of c ow b oybu i l d e r s and jobs for the boys. Toadd to that weve just gone through adeep recession which has furtherdamaged the industrys appeal andrecruitment prospects.Although the industry is moving

    slowly out of recession, the sector still

    faces a worrying skills shortage. Thenumber of apprentices coming in hasdropped in the last few years and em-ployers are now struggling to keep upwith recent surge in demand d r ive nmainly by the sharp increase in out-put in private housing market.In the South West, our research

    shows that from 20142018 more than30,000 new recruits will be needed andof those well need around 13,650 ap-prentices coming through. Woodtrades, painters and decorators andelectrical and plumbing roles will bemost in demand.To drill down even further and

    Above,Whitefriars,the landmarkcity centreoffice. Left,Amy Weston,spa managerat theD o u b l e Tre eby Hilton,CadburyHouse, inC o n g re s b u r y

    The op-ed column

    identify in greater detail the skillsneeds particular to the West of Eng-land, CITB has been in talks with theLocal Enterprise Partnership and thefour unitary councils to consider set-ting up a joint investment strategythat would look to address local em-ployers skills needs as well as fillingin local gaps. CITB has agreed to fund500,000 of additional training that ismatched by the City/LEP.The joint investment plan would

    then have 1 million to invest in tolocal skills gaps and training. Thisnew initiative would look at a varietyof options of growth through busi-ness, people and local initiatives. Tar-gets would concentrate on reskillingunemployed construction workers,engaging with the unemployed andNEETs, providing business skills tolocal companies and embedding em-

    ployment and skills in to procure-ment and planning contracts throughthe National Skills Academy for Con-str uctions client based approach. Pri-ority would be given to areas wherethere are identifiable gaps and sup-port local growth.Joint investment talks have been

    ongoing and have the support of themayor and the LEP chair but the iden-tity of the citys match funding stilldelays progress. Nevertheless, therehas been a great deal of enthusiasmand optimism from both parties thusfar and CITB will do everything wecan to work with local government toget this off the ground.The more training opportunities

    we can provide the more we can pub-licise construction careers and allowmore people to follow in Lukes foot-ste ps.

    Roger StoneConstruction IndustryTraining Board

    Some interesting names from thebusiness community among thoseawarded honorary degrees in thepast week.Alexandra Workwear founder

    John Prior was rewarded by UWEsFaculty of Arts, Creative Industriesand Education as a result of hiswork for the Princes Trust. He hasben involved for many years and isnow chairman of the trusts councilin the South West.Mark Mason, founder of

    Clifton-based app developerMubaloo, has been made a Doctorof Technology.John Ponton was made a Doctor

    of Science, recognising his

    contribution to sustainabledevelopment. Born in Southville, hefounded JT Group in 1961 making aname in green issues aroundconstruction and urban renewal.And Andrew Gregg has become a

    Doctor of Laws. After working as apartner at Osborne Clarke in Bristolfor 20 years he founded his ownfirm, now Gregg Latchams.In somewhat unusual move, UWE

    Vice Chancellor Steve West wasgiven an honorary degree himself...by Bristol University.Steve was made Doctor of Laws

    for his work in healthcare and forBristol. His many roles in the cityinclude President of the BristolChamber of Commerce.

    And the rest It was a good week for UWE. Theuniversity was named as a finalist inthe 2014 National Business Awards,in the Blackberry Business Enablerof the Year category.Simon Feary, chief executive of

    the Chartered Quality Institute andone of the judges, described UWEas: A real business enabler acrossa broad range of initiatives. UWEmines its rich vein of talent reallyeffectively, showing what can bedone to benefit business whenintellectual capital is combined withcommercial nous.The winners are announced in

    N o v e m b e r.

    And it was a good week too forSMEs and jobseekers, it seems.A survey by The HR Dept found

    58 per cent of SMEs surveyed inthe city were gearing up for growthand looking to recruit in the next sixmonths.The firm reports demand for its

    expertise in Bristol is also on therise, with use of its recruitmentservices up 14 per cent.Founder and managing director

    Sue Tumelty said: Our surveyclearly shows rising confidence inthe economy among smallemployers who are intent ongrowing their businesses.

    It is good to see that thosebusinesses are also investing in theadvice and support to help themmake the right people choices:certainly there is more cautionabout ensuring the recruitmentstrategy is right and investing inappointments wisely.

    Your digest of the week in business

    In numbers

    Business currentaccounts

    Petrol prices

    1.01%10,000 deposit

    0.25%1 deposit

    State Bankof India

    Corporation tax

    21 %20 %Main rate

    Small profitsrate below

    300,000

    131 .35pUnleaded135 .7 1 pDiesel139 .93 pSuperunleaded70 .56pLPGSource: PetrolPrices.com

    Business savingsaccounts

    1.8%10,000 deposit

    1.85%1,000 deposit

    Cambridge &Counties Bank

    Inflation (CPI)

    1.9 %

    Weekly earnings

    0.6 %Base interest rate

    0.5 %Ave mortgage rate

    3.99 %

    S o u rc e :

    Secure TrustBank

    Inflation (RPI)

    2.6 %