Burnaby Now February 26 2016

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  • FRIDAY FEBRUARY 26, 2016 LOCAL NEWS LOCAL MATTERS

    NEWS 3 NEWS 11 SPORTS 28

    How to help refugee kids The art of quilting lives on Wrestling family in the spotlight

    Theres more at Burnabynow.com

    Leesayshospital inworksbutNDPdoubts itByJeremyDeutschjdeutsch@burnabynow.com

    A new or refurbishedBurnaby Hospital is still inthe works according to thecitys lone Liberal MLA,but critics wont be holding

    their breath.Burnaby North MLA

    Richard Lee said he spokewith the Minister of Healthrecently and was told therewas a location for the newhospital and the projectwould start in the next three

    years.He said there is $4 mil-

    lion in funding for the plan-ning process of new hospi-tal, which would be locatedat the current site.Lee noted a new St.

    Pauls Hospital inVancou-

    ver and the redevelopmentof Royal Columbian Hospi-tal in NewWestminster areahead of a new hospital forBurnaby.The planning itself is

    very fluid right now, at thisstage, depending on how

    the project for St. Pauls andRoyal Columbian are go-ing, he told theNOW. Ifirmly believe this is comingand its in stages coming.Lee also suggested there

    might be adjustments to thecapital plan for the hospital

    in an effort to try and avoidoverlapping services withthe two new hospitals in theregion.Last week, the NDPs

    Kathy Corrigan was critical

    IN THE INDIGO: Chieko Chijiwa, left, and Yukiko Yosa, with seven-year-old Sophia, try their hand at indigo dyeing in a workshop at the Nikkei NationalMuseum and Cultural Centre on Sunday. The Nikkei Centre held the aizome workshop to introduce people to the centuries-old technique that produces thedistinctive colour sometimesknownas Japanblue. Seemorephotosonlineatwww.burnabynow.com.PHOTOJENNIFERGAUTHIER

    $5Mbonus inschoolbudgetByCorneliaNaylorcnaylor@burnabynow.com

    Higher than expected enrolment andinternational student fees in the Burn-aby school district will bring in $5 mil-lion more in funding than anticipat-ed this year, according to an amendedbudget approvedTuesday.Compared to the preliminary bud-

    get passed in April, the updated finan-cial plan shows about 194 more stu-dents than projected enrolled in regularprograms this year, along with 164more than expected students with spe-cial needs.That helped push the districts to-

    tal provincial operating grant $1.6 mil-lion higher than projected in the origi-nal budget.International student fees, mean-

    while, were nearly $3 million higherthan expected thanks to 188 more in-ternational students enrolling in the dis-trict than anticipated.The districts expenses are also up in

    the amended budget by nearly $3 mil-lion, thanks mostly to salary-cost in-creases, including teacher and supportstaff raises and 13 more teaching posi-tions than in the original budget.Last April, the district projected an

    over $3.6-million operating deficit forthe 2015/16 school year.With the higher than expected rev-

    enues, that deficit has been cut to justover $1.9 million in the amended bud-get.The gap will be covered with some of

    the nearly $10 million the district has insurplus accounts, leaving local schoolswith just over $7.3 million in reserves.

    EDUCATION

    Continuedonpage8

    CITYCOLOURS

    5SEE PAGE 13

    THINGS TO DOTHISWEEKEND

    COFFEE WITH RICHARD!Saturday, February 27

    9:00 - 10:30 amCaffe Artigiano

    4359 Hastings, Burnaby

    I hope to see you there!

    RichardT. Lee MLA

    Richard.Lee.MLA@leg.bc.cawww.richardleemla.bc.ca

    Burnaby North604.775.0778

    Order Take-Out.Call 310-SPOT (7768)

    or order online atwww.whitespot.ca

  • 2 FRIDAY February 26, 2016 BurnabyNOWMORREYNISSAN.COM

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  • WELCOME: AsmaaHusseinandherone-year-olddaughter Laial,whoarrived fromLebanononeweekago, joinotherSyrian refugeefamilies at awelcoming tea in theEdmondsCommunitySchool gymWednesday. PHOTOCORNELIANAYLOR

    HowtohelpthechildrenLocal teachers concerned about how to support refugee students flock toworkshop by child psychologist who specializes in abuse and trauma

    ByCorneliaNaylorcnaylor@burnabynow.com

    Burnaby teachers andsupport staff packed a roomat Burnaby North Second-ary Friday to learn moreabout how to support refu-gee children.B.C. Childrens Hospi-

    tal child psychologist Sa-rina Kot, who specializesin trauma and abuse, lednearly 50 local educatorsin a three-hour session thatexamined how trauma whether caused by abuse orby experiencing violence ina war-torn country affectsthe brain.The event of abuse and

    war are different, but theinternal system of the brainand the nervous systemwould be similar in that ac-tivation feeling unsafe,Kot told theNOW.Teachers already do

    many things that help kidsrecover from that feeling,like providing a safe envi-ronment and having mean-ingful relationships, Kotsaid.Another important thing

    they can do is simply listento kids talk about their ex-

    periences, which Kot saidcalms the trauma brain(amygdala) and activatesthe thinking brain (prefron-tal cortex), allowing the stu-dent to make sense of expe-riences and file them awayin an organized way.An event that doesnt

    make sense is like a pile thatonce you pull anything, thewhole thing will fall.Thatswhy kids act freaked out,Kot said.One tip she shared with

    teachers was to end eachdifficult conversation insafety.If a childs talking about

    horrible things, no matterwhere they are or how theyneed to stop, take like 30seconds to end it by thank-ing the child for sharing aswell as summarizing theevent, not by saying, Thatwas scary but You are nowsafe.Thats like parking it,Kot said.The workshop part of a

    district professional devel-opment day that featured118 workshops was orga-nized in response to an in-flux of Syrian refugees intoBurnaby since early No-vember, which has brought

    18 new families and morethan 42 new students intothe school district.It was very useful,Na-

    talya Khan, coordinatorfor the districts settlementworkers in schools (SWIS)program, said of the work-

    shop, and everyone whostayed behind to thank Sa-rina, they all reiterated that.They said it was very usefulfor them, it was very help-ful.But during the session

    educators raised concernsabout whether the districthad the resources to sup-port, not just the students,but their families, accord-ing to district English lan-guage learning consultantAnnThorup.

    Many also wanted toknow what to do and whatnot to do when it comes totheir refugee students.I think theres the fear

    that, I dont want to dam-age the child even more,Thorup said. Having achild break down in classis very nerve-racking for ateacher because they dontknow how to deal with thatbecause they havent beentrained in how to deal withthat.And we dont want tomake things worse.Kot, however, said one

    thing she hoped all partic-ipants took away from theworkshop was that theyredoing a lot of importantthings right already.I hope they take away

    that they can make a differ-ence, and the brain researchsupports what they knowintuitively, she said.For Marlborough Ele-

    mentary Grad 6/7 teacherBarbWrinkle, that messagecame as a relief.The whole workshop

    was very calming and veryreassuring to me that I wason the right track, she said.

    WinningMPsspentmorethan$100,000eachWant to be anMP in

    Burnaby? Better start sav-ing because youre going toneed six figures.Candidates from two

    Burnaby ridings in last fallsfederal election have be-gun filing campaign re-turn forms with ElectionsCanada, and the two win-ning MPs spent more than$100,000 on their cam-paigns.Rookie Burnaby North-

    Seymour MPTerry Beechspent $129,730 on his win-ning campaign, while rais-ing $123,252 in contribu-tions, according to ElectionsCanadas campaign financesummary.However, the bulk of the

    contributions, $117,899,came as transfers from theLiberal Party.Since the transfers are

    listed as coming from theparty, its unclear who spe-cifically contributed toBeechs campaign.But the forms do list

    where the Liberal MP spenthis money during the elec-tion.Besides paying for var-

    ious campaign workersand office-related expens-es, the biggest ticket itemswere two payments total-ling $26,656 to MainstreetTechnologies, a companylisted as a voter contact call-

    ing service.Neither the NDP can-

    didate Carol Baird Ellanor Conservative candidateMike Little have filed theircampaign returns.Beech won the riding

    with 36.1 per cent of thevote, or 18,928 votes.The election expense

    limits for all candidates is$207,659.Across town, Burnaby

    South NDP candidate Ken-nedy Stewart won his re-election campaign in a tightrace, spending $180,599 onhis victory.The second termMP re-

    ceived the bulk of his con-tributions through transfers,totalling $214,296.All of the transfers are

    listed as coming from theNDP, so its unclear whospecifically contributed toStewarts campaign.The form also lists where

    Stewart spent his money,which includes campaignworkers and office relatedexpenses. But he also madetwo payments totalling$15,000 to Strategic Com-munications, a voter contactcalling service.Stewart squeaked out a

    win on election night cap-turing 16,094 votes, whichwas just 547 more than theLiberals Adam Pankratz.Neither Pankratz nor

    Conservative candidateGrace Seear have filed theirelection expenses.

    Improvingtrail safety?As local police contin-

    ue their investigation into asexual assault along a busycity trail, Burnabys may-or is open to making safe-ty improvements if recom-mended.Derek Corrigan said the

    city would look at any rec-ommendations that comefrom the RCMP related tothe recent attack.If they can see some-

    thing we can do, well bevery interested in follow-ing up with it, he told theNOW, noting any discus-sion would be through thecitys public safety commit-tee. In a city that has asmuch open and green spaceas we do, its impossible tolight the whole city.The incident happened

    lastThursday (Feb. 18)when a woman, walkingalong a path on the Burn-aby Mountain UrbanTrailaround 12:40 p.m., was ap-proached by a man and sex-ually assaulted.The woman was taken to

    hospital for treatment.Police said the incident

    happened off the main trailon a smaller path that con-nects to Government Street.The suspect fled into thebushes toward LougheedMall.TheNOW spoke to sev-

    eral people in the neigh-bourhood the following daywho said they dont feel safeor will only use the trail witha partner.

    By Jeremy Deutsch

    NEWSINBRIEF

    NewsnowINOURSCHOOLS

    I think theresthe fear that, Idont want to

    damage thechildevenmore

    ByJeremyDeutschjdeutsch@burnabynow.com

    BurnabyNOW FRIDAY February 26, 2016 3

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  • Citynow

    JeremyDeutschjdeutsch@burnabynow.com

    Hemight have beenbeaming during his allegedrobbery spree, but thatsmile has likely been wipedoff his face.Less than a day after ap-

    pealing for the publics helpto catch a prolific bank rob-ber committing crimes inboth Burnaby andVancou-ver, police made an arrest.TheVancouver Police De-

    partment confirmed the ar-rest lastThursday in Burn-aby of a suspect allegedlyinvolved in nine bank rob-beries over the last month.Police said they received a

    number of tips after a pub-lic appeal was made lastThursday afternoon, askingfor help identifying a manseen in surveillance pho-tos.Around 8:30 p.m. thatnight, an arrest was madefollowing the 10th robbery,at theTD Bank located at4994 Kingsway in Burnaby.With advances in video

    technology, evidence collec-tion and security measuresat banks, its not a matter ofif you will caught for rob-bing a bank, its a matter of

    when, saidVPD spokesper-son Sgt. Randy Fincham ina statement.Its not clear whether it

    was theVPD or BurnabyRCMP who made the ar-rest.The suspect, identifed

    as a 24-year-old Burnabyman, is facing one robberycharge.However, police expect

    more charges in the future.He is currently behind

    bars until his next court ap-pearance, which hasnt beenset.Investigators also havent

    said how much money

    the suspect, who has beendubbed the smiling ban-dit by police because hewas smiling in surveillancephotos, made off with dur-ing his alleged crime spree.Prior to the arrest, police

    believed the man was be-hind nine robberies in total,including four in Burnaby.In all of the robberies,

    the suspect claimed he wasarmed with a weapon.

    Tipshelpcopsmakearrest inrobberies

    Suspect:Police say tips receivedafter they released this surveillancefootagehelped lead toanarrest.PHOTOCONTRIBUTED

    CRIME

    BurnabyNOW FRIDAY February 26, 2016 5

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