brand identity guidelines - aboriginal affairs nsw brand identity... · 2 ochre: brand identity...

of 31 /31
Brand Identity Guidelines @ November 2016

Author: duonglien

Post on 09-Mar-2018

227 views

Category:

Documents


5 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Brand Identity

    Guidelines

    @ November 2016

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 2

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    Contents

    1. introduction 3

    2. OCHRE IdentIty 4

    About OCHRE 4

    the OCHRE Logo 4

    Logo variation 5

    correct usage 6

    incorrect usage 7

    colour palette 8

    typography 9

    Supporting graphics 11

    Supporting graphics in action 14

    3. OCHRE - a COninuing COnvERsatiOn IdentIty 21

    the occ Logo 21

    occ Logo variations 22

    correct usage 23

    colour palette 24

    Supporting graphics in action 26

    4. ProtocoLS for uSe 29

  • OCHRE stands for opportunity,

    choice, healing, responsibility,

    empowerment and is the nsW

    Government Plan for Aboriginal affairs

    which has education, employment and

    accountability at its heart.

    these guidelines have been created

    to help Aboriginal Affairs (AA) present

    a professional, unified and consistent

    OCHRE sub-brand identity across all

    materials including Government,

    public and inhouse documentation.

    note: these guidelines are specifically for ochre and

    ochre - a continuing conversation branded

    communications. For materials branded under the

    aboriginal affairs corporate identity, please refer to the

    aa Corporate style guidelines availabe by contacting the

    director, strategy and Coordination.

    1.0 introduCtion

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 3

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    1. introduCtion

  • About OCHRE

    ochre stands for opportunity, choice, healing,

    responsibility and empowerment, and is the nsW

    government Plan for aboriginal affairs which has

    education, employment and accountability at its heart.

    ochre commits the nsW government to a different

    way of working with, and in support of, aboriginal

    communities by building strong working partnerships

    that have at their heart respect for local aboriginal

    culture, leadership and decision making.

    The OCHRE logo

    the ochre logo is a simple, typographical brandmark

    intended to work with other supporting graphics (see pg

    11) to build a flexible, memorable and personable brand

    identity.

    the logo may appear in any colour from the ochre

    colour palette (see page 8) provided there is adequate

    contrast with the background it is placed on, or used as

    reverse (in white) on a darker background or image.

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 4

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    2. OCHRE identity

    Positive logo (black)

    reverse logo (white)

  • Logo variation

    in instances where the ochre logo appears as a stand

    alone - ie. without explanation or documentation, it is

    recommended the logo appear with a supporting line which

    helps define the ochre brand.

    this logo version includes the definition line beneath the

    ochre brandmark, as shown below:

    When used at a size smaller than shown (110mm wide) the

    supporting line may be removed and used elsewhere on a

    page at a readable size.

    To obtain a copy of the logo in its various formats,

    or if you require assistance or advice regarding the most

    suitable logo to use for your specific purposes, please refer

    to the director, strategy and Coordination or email

    [email protected]

    2. OCHRE identity

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 5

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

  • Correct usage

    it is important to use the ochre logo correctly. below are

    some key aspects that must be adhered to ensure the

    integrity of the logo is maintained.

    Minimum clear space

    this is the area around the logo that must be left clear

    without text, imagery or other logos.

    this is to ensure the logo has visual prominence and

    avoids appearing crowded or lost within materials.

    Minimum clear space maintained around all edges of the

    logo must be no less than the HalF the height of the O

    in ochre.

    therefore, minimum space around the logo is indicated

    by the blue:

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 6

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    2x

    x

    x

    2. OCHRE identity

  • Do not atempt to recreate, redraw or change proportions of

    the logo. the correct logo is available in various formats on

    request. see page 5 to obtain a copy of the logo.

    2. OCHRE identity

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 7

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    Incorrect usage

    OCHRE

    Do not rotate or place the logo on an angle.

    Do not stretch or distort the logo in any way.

    Do not adjust or change the colours in any way. Only use

    the logo variations in existence as specified on pages 4-5.

    Do not use a tint or watermark of the logo. the logo must

    always be produced at 100% opacity.

  • Colour palette

    For documents, graphics and materials created under the

    core ochre brand identity, a specific colour palette has

    been developed to help bind the materials visually.

    the colours have been derived from a warm, natural

    palette, and help support a more unified brand across

    multiple visual platforms.

    ample use of white space unifies the palette with contrast

    and vibrancy.

    additional colours and variations (tints and shades) of the

    key colours may be used within materials, however the

    specified key colours should form the main colour palette.

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 8

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    Sand: 1C, 5M, 8Y, 10K

    Ochre: 10C, 25M, 100Y, 10K

    Burnt Earth: 82M, 100Y, 8K

    F

    Fire: 18C, 100M, 100Y, 8K

    Eggplant: 44C, 100M, 33Y, 50K

    Black: 100K

    2. OCHRE identity

  • Typography

    Within documentation, we recommend specific fonts be

    used for an overall consistent appearance with maximum

    legibility. Please adhere to the following guidelines.

    Fonts

    the preferred font for use throughout aboriginal affairs

    literature is Helvetica (various weights) at 11pt for body

    text. For inhouse documentation, or when Helvetica is not

    available, arial is to be used instead.

    We understand sometimes type needs to be reduced

    slightly to fit onto a single page etc, but recommend the

    body text does not appear below a minimum of 10pt.

    Helvetica Light 11pt

    abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

    AbCdefGHijkLmnoPqrstuvWxyzAbCdefGHijkLmnoPq

    rstuvWxyz

    Helvetica roman 11pt

    abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

    abCdeFgHijklMnOPqrstuvWxyzabCdeFgHijklMnOP

    qrstuvWxyz

    Helvetica Bold 11pt

    abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

    aBcDeFGHIjklMNopqrsTuvwxyzaBcDeFGHIjklMNop

    qrsTuvwxyz

    arial 11pt

    abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

    AbcdefghijkLmnoPqrStuvwxyzAbcdefghijkLmnoP

    qrStuvwxyz

    arial Bold 11pt

    abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

    abcdefghIjklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghIjklmnop

    qrstuvwxyz

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 9

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    2. OCHRE identity

  • letter spacing

    kerning (or horizontal spacing between characters)

    should be set to standard or 0.

    ie: the quick brown fox

    avoid tight kerning:

    the quick brown fox

    avoid open or extended kerning:

    t h e q u i c k b r o w n f o x

    leading (or vertical spacing between lines of text) is set

    at a minimum of 11/14pt, with an ideal setting of 11/16pt

    where space allows.

    contrast

    text should be printed with the highest possible contrast.

    dark text on light background is ideal. However, light (white

    or yellow) letters on a dark (black) background is also

    acceptable. avoid red text on black, and black text on red.

    alignment

    text should always be aligned left. justification is not

    recommended.

    Oreet, conum acilissed elis ea feugiam velis augait

    iliqui blaorpero commolore modolobore consed

    exer ip eugue tie.

    line lengths

    Having the right amount of characters on each line is key to

    the readability of your text. it shouldnt merely be your

    design that dictates the width of your text, it should also be

    a matter of legibility.

    the optimal line length for your body text is considered to

    be 50-70 characters per line, including spaces.

    For this reason, a 2 column layout is recommended for a

    standard a4 document.

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 10

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    2. OCHRE identity

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 11

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    Supporting graphics

    aa has developed a suite of visual elements that act as

    supporting graphics for the ochre brand, and form a

    distinctive visual identity across materials and publications.

    When used consistently across all communications, this will

    help to create a recognisable and known brand for ochre.

    depending on the level of communication and purpose of

    publication (ie. report vs newsletter) individual, specific

    visual elements and combinations of those elements help

    define the purpose of the publication and its audience.

    One or more design elements can be chosen for a

    publication or communications product from this range and

    used as the key feature of the design.

    kim Healey artwork strip

    kim Healeys artwork is regular used as a top strip running

    across the cover of major publications and reports. Please

    refer to page 14-17 for examples of this artwork in use.

    aborignal affairs has permission from the artist to use this

    artwork exclusively for ochre materials, and should

    always be credited (kim Healy).

    Where space permits, the following wording should appear on

    the inside front cover, along with a full image of the artwork

    (see page 16 for an example of usage):

    Artist Recognition: Kim healey is a descendant of the Bundjalung and

    Gumbaynggirr nations, and also a descendant of the Djunbun (Platypus) clan,

    original custodians of the Washpool at Lionsville in Northern NSW. She currently

    lives within country in South Grafton NSW, creating and telling her stories along the

    mighty clarence river. Kim strives to capture country and utilise her voice through

    her work, to interpret the world around her.

    This work captures Kim healeys connection to country. It speaks of the Bundjalung

    and Gumbaynggirr nations which were created by the Yuladarah, the creator of rivers,

    boundaries and tribal land. This is the clarence river boundary with Susan Island in

    the middle of these two tribes which is a birthing place. Using a sgraffito technique,

    scribing in the sandy medium is a mapping system of country.

    2. OCHRE identity

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 12

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    ocHre circles

    a key graphic made of a series of textural circles has been

    developed to visually illustrate the opportunity, choice,

    healing, responsibility, empowerment concept. this

    graphic is a useful device to highlight the core ochre

    concept, and is available in both square and horizontal

    versions for use. Note - this graphic should not be used at

    a size that makes the text illegible.

    Square version:

    horizontal version:

    2. OCHRE identity

  • Brushstroke keyline

    a hand drawn keyline has been developed to sit directly

    beneath the kim Healey artwork strip, to create a divide

    between the artwork and any colour blocking or imagery

    used beneath. it may also be used in other areas to help

    create definition, and add an organic, softer feel to

    documention.

    Please refer to pages 14 - 20 for usage examples.

    Imagery and photography

    due to issues around culturally sensitive material and the

    challenges associated with limited availability of stock

    photography of nsW based aboriginal and torres strait

    islander people, it is advised ochre imagery is:

    a) sourced and provided by aboriginal affairs;

    and/or

    b) textural and graphical imagery sourced from the natural

    environment of nsW. this may include textures and

    close-up imagery of stone, coastal elements such as

    sand, water and rock, local native flora, etc.

    some examples that have been used to date include:

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 13

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    2. OCHRE identity

    sand

    Coastal grass Coastal rock

    rock

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 14

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    Supporting graphics in action

    this section is designed as a reference for what has been

    produced in the past and reflects the previously outlined

    supporting graphics in action. Consistency is a vital part of

    any brand identity, however flexibility is also required when

    a broad variety of documentation and materials is required

    under a single brand identity.

    therefore, whilst design and layouts may vary or evolve

    over time, it is important to understand where they began

    and ensure a change process, if required, is gradual.

    the following examples have been broken into two

    distinct styles:

    1. key reports - e.g. ochre: two years on

    these are major publications for aa under the ochre

    brand and are for internal, Ministerial and external

    audiences. they are generally multi-page documents

    2. secondary Documentation - e.g. newsletters,

    discussion Papers, etc

    these are regularly produced and updated documents

    with minimal pages, and are often text driven.

    2. OCHRE identity

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 15

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    2. OCHRE identity

    Two years on

    Setting up and runningOCHRE initiatives withAboriginal communities

    Learning together, working together, walking together

    kim Heeley artwork stripbrushstroke keyline

    textural imagery

    textural graphic

    logo strip

    brushstroke keyline

    key report - Cover design (sample)

    a full copy of this report is available to download athttp://www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au/ochre-annual-reports

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 16

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    2. OCHRE identity

    Healing

    Empowerment

    Healing

    Opportunity

    ResponsibilityChoice

    2

    ARTIST RECOGNITION

    Kim Healey is a descendant of the Bundjalung andGumbaynggirr nations, and also a descendant ofthe Djunbun (Platypus) Clan, original custodiansof the Washpool at Lionsville in Northern NSW.She currently lives within Country in SouthGrafton NSW, creating and telling her stories alongthe mighty Clarence River. Kim strives to captureCountry and utilise her voice through her work, to interpret the world around her.

    This work captures Kim Healeys connection toCountry. It speaks of the Bundjalung andGumbaynggirr nations which were created by theYuladarah, the creator of rivers, boundaries andtribal land. This is the Clarence River boundary with Susan Island in the middle of these two tribeswhich is a birthing place. Using a sgraffitotechnique, scribing in the sandy medium is amapping system of Country.

    Ochre is culturally significant to Aboriginal people within NSWand is used in ceremonies to bind people to each other andtheir Country. Ochre is recognised for its special healing powerswhich promote physical, emotional and spiritual health.

    ISBN: 978-0-9585971-4-2 September 2015

    [email protected] www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au

    textural stripbrushstroke keyline

    ochre circles graphic

    artist recognition

    textural imagery background

    brushstroke keyline

    key report - inside front cover design (sample)

    a full copy of this report is available to download athttp://www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au/ochre-annual-reports

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 17

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    2. OCHRE identity

    key report - text pages (sample)

    Professor ShaneHoustonDeputy ViceChancellor(IndigenousStrategy andServices) Universityof Sydney

    Mr Stephen RyanChair, Coalition ofAboriginal PeakOrganisations

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    ISBN 978-0-646-90201-2 March 2013

    [email protected] www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au

    The Hon. VictorDominello MP(Chair)Minister forAboriginal Affairs

    Mr Danny LesterChief Executive,AboriginalEmploymentStrategy

    Ms MaydinaPenrithYouth member

    The Hon. JillianSkinner MPMinister for Health

    The Hon. AdrianPiccoli MPMinister forEducation

    ARTIST RECOGNITION

    Kim Healey is a descendant of the Bundjalung andGumbaynggirr nations, and also a descendant of theDjunbun (Platypus) Clan, original custodians of theWashpool at Lionsville in Northern NSW. Shecurrently lives within Country in South Grafton NSW,creating and telling her stories along the mightyClarence River. Kim strives to capture Country andutilise her voice through her work, to interpret theworld around her.

    This work captures Kim Healeys connection toCountry. It speaks of the Bundjalung andGumbaynggirr nations which were created by theYuladarah, the creator of rivers, boundaries andtribal land. This is the Clarence River boundary withSusan Island in the middle of these two tribes whichis a birthing place. Using a sgraffito technique,scribing in the sandy medium is a mapping systemof country.

    2

    !!"&

    is culturally significant to Aboriginal people within NSW and is used in ceremonies to bind people to each other and theirCountry. Ochre is recognised for its special healing powerswhich promote physical, emotional and spiritual health.

    A

    % "

    "#"&

    The implementation of OCHRE is underpinned by arobust accountability framework that includesindependent monitoring and assessment, regular publicreporting and an approach to evaluation that hasAboriginal communities setting the measures of success.

    Solution Brokerage requires NSW Governmentagencies to work with each other, and to collaboratewith NGOs, to find practical solutions to issues thatmight otherwise fall between the cracks. This includesissues that no agency has a clear mandate to resolve,that have whole-of-government implications, or thathave been identified for attention by Secretaries theheads of NSW Government agencies.

    Independent oversight

    OCHRE Project Managers provide information to theDeputy Ombudsman (Aboriginal Programs) whoindependently monitors OCHRE. The DeputyOmbudsmans first assessment of OCHRE can befound at www.ombo.nsw.gov.au.

    Evaluation

    Key achievements

    A framework to monitor, evaluate, report andimprove OCHRE initiatives completed by theCultural and Indigenous Research CentreAustralia (CIRCA) in June 2015. The framework,known as MERI (Monitoring, Evaluation, Reportingand Improvement), includes the measures ofsuccess negotiated to date with Aboriginalleaders, industry and NGO partners. MERI appliesto Aboriginal Language and Culture Nests,Industry Based Agreements, Local DecisionMaking and Opportunity Hubs ConnectedCommunities will be evaluated separately. As partof MERI the measures of success will be revisitedto ensure they reflect the views of communitiesover the 10 years of evaluation.

    OCHRE: An approach to evaluation, published inFebruary 2015, committing the NSW Governmentto an ethical and participatory practice. Thepublication can be found atwww.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au.

    Monitoring data collected from mature initiativesand reported in this document. Early outcomesexpected across the OCHRE initiatives from2017. The NSW Government recognises that itwill take time before any medium- or long-termoutcomes are evident and even longer forimpacts to be apparent.

    Evaluation of Murdi Paaki Regional AssemblyAccord negotiation (Local Decision Making)published in June 2015. The findings will informfuture Accord negotiations. The publication canbe found at www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au.

    The Social Policy Research Centre (SPRC) at theUniversity of New South Wales engaged todevelop a research practice guide to supportgovernment and non-government individuals andagencies to undertake ethical and culturallyappropriate research with Aboriginalcommunities. A guide is expected to be ready totest with Aboriginal communities in early 2016.

    Solution Brokerage

    Key achievements

    Solution Brokerage Policy and OperationalFramework, Fact Sheet and Frequently AskedQuestions published in March 2015. They can befound at www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au.

    A Premiers Memorandum on Solution Brokeragepublished in March 2015, vesting authority toinvoke the Solution Brokerage function in the Headof Aboriginal Affairs and placing a positiveobligation on NSW Government agencies toparticipate and support the resolution of local,regional and State-wide issues. The Memorandumcan be found at www.dpc.nsw.gov.au.

    Two Solution Brokerage issues declared:

    Resolution of long-standing land andeconomic participation issues with the EdenLocal Aboriginal Land Council area

    Development of an integrated early childhoodservice model for the Murdi Paaki region.

    12

    STAYING ACCOUNTABLEHEALING

    OCHRE acknowledges that healing andintergenerational trauma and loss are real, significantand ongoing issues for Aboriginal communities.

    34

    Aboriginal wellbeing has social, economic,emotional, cultural and spiritual dimensions andhealing needs to occur at the individual, family andcommunity level. Healing is a process that takes timeand cannot be achieved through a one-off event orprogram. Many previous government programs andpolicies contributed significantly to the trauma, lossand pain felt by many Aboriginal people.

    OCHRE includes a commitment from the NSWGovernment to work with Aboriginal communities,policy practitioners and service providers toadvance the dialogue in NSW about trauma andhealing and to begin developing responses informedby evidence of good practice and the real-lifeexperiences of Aboriginal people.

    Images: OCHRE Healing Forum Mapu Yaan Gurri,Marrunggir Healing Our Way, at the University ofNew South Wales, 23 July 2014.

    5. MAJO

    R IN

    ITIATIVES

    23

    report for the Closing the Gap Clearinghouse, WhatWorks to Overcome Indigenous Disadvantage.

    In addition, by comparing research from NewZealand, Canada, the United States and Australia itis evident that:

    The relationship between Aboriginal people andgovernment agencies in NSW is unclear andlacks well defined and clearly identified points ofcontact for Aboriginal communities

    Investment at the community level is inadequateto sustain staffing, funding or leadershipdevelopment

    Governance structures currently in place lackpathways of progression, programs to strengthenself-management and a government agency as achampion.

    International best practice identifies six key elementsto support local decision making:

    1. Building capacity within communities to work inpartnership with government

    2. Building capacity within government to work inpartnership with communities

    3. Enabling communities to define the issues andpriorities which drive negotiated local responses

    4. Integrating and coordinating service deliveryacross all levels of government

    5. Building strong partnerships betweengovernment and non-government sectors todeliver effective localised responses

    6. Localising accountability, reflection and review.

    STA

    GES

    3

    2

    1URBAN REGIONAL REMOTE

    PLANNING DELEGATION Allows the community

    governance structure to move from a Local Management Committee to take on the duties of a Board of Management

    Sets service delivery priorities in partnership with government

    Can direct the allocation of specied funding

    IMPLEMENTATION DELEGATION Allows the community

    governance structure to take on greater responsibilities as a Board of Management

    Sets service delivery priorities in partnership with government

    Can direct the allocation of specied funding

    Can manage the delivery of services

    Reports formally to government

    ADVISORY DELEGATION Builds on existing

    governance structure to form a Local Management Committee

    Sets service delivery priorities in partnership with government

    LOCAL DECISION MAKING

    24

    T

    I am pleased to release the second annual report ofthe Opportunity, Choice, Healing, Responsibility andEmpowerment (OCHRE) plan. The NSW Governmentis as committed today to listening to, partnering with,and delivering with, the Aboriginal communities as itwas in 2011 when this journey began.

    Working together as partners to design, deliver and evaluate is critical.

    Aboriginal communities told us that improved outcomes would come from programdesign and delivery. Two years on the successes of the OCHRE initiatives rely ongovernment listening to, and working in partnership, with local communities.

    Sustainable change takes time. I am pleased to see solid progress in expandingdelivery and achieving outcomes through Industry Based Agreements,Connected Communities, Aboriginal Language and Culture Nests, andOpportunity Hubs operating across the State.

    I am heartened by the strong commitment of Aboriginal leaders across sixregional alliances to progress Local Decision Making. The NSW Governmentparticularly recognises the Murdi Paaki Regional Assembly who are leading thiswork in Western NSW to ensure that Government services are fit for purpose.

    Over the next 12 months I look forward to a greater focus on Healing. NSW leadsthe country in recognising the impact of the past and working with the communityto build confidence and respect. Healing is central to every OCHRE initiative.

    OCHRE will also be pivotal in achieving the Governments State Priorities foreducation, to increase the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanderstudents in the top two NAPLAN bands for reading and numeracy by 30 per cent.

    OCHRE is the NSW Governments commitment to Aboriginal communities and Ilook forward to continuing to work in partnership to progress achievements overthe next 12 months.

    Leslie Williams MPMinister for Aboriginal Affairs

    4

    MINISTERS FOREWORD

    13

    ABORIGINAL LANGUAGE AND CULTURE NESTS

    Ngiyanhi winhanganha nganha Wiradjuri mayiny-galang-guNgiyanggarra-bang malang-galang-gu nganhayung mayiny-galang-gungangaanha-gu Ngurambang-ga.

    Wiray TAFE-gu-bu, Wiray School-galang-gu-bu, Wiray University-galang-gu-bu!

    Nganyguliya gariya nganhayung ngiyanggarra-gu-bu gariya gulbabang-gu-bu.

    Ngiyanhi ngamangamarra nganha Wiradjuri ngiyanggarra-bang-galanggarry-gu-bu dumbarra-bu widyungga mulan-gu garray ngindhu yanhanhi.

    Ngiyanhi ngamangamarra-bang nganha ngiyanhi malang-dhuray NgurambangWirimbigunhanha-gu nganha nganhayung mayiny-galang ngangaagirriNganhayung Wiradjuri Ngiyanggarra-gu-bu gulbabang-gu-bu.

    Ngurambang Dhaga ngiyanhi ngiilinya marramarraNgiyanggarra-girr-bang-gu-bu.

    Gulbabang-girr-gu-bu.

    Aunty Diane McNaboe and

    Uncle Stan Grant AM, Wiradjuri Eldersand language speakers and teachers,and Rod Towney, Director AboriginalEducation and Equity Provision, who have given permission for theirmessage to be printed in Wiradjuri.

    21 July 2014

    English translation:

    We (all) think that Wiradjuri peoples veryimportant speak/language should belongto our people to look after and care for in special place.

    Not to TAFE and Not to Schools andNot to Universities also!

    They do not own our language orCultural Knowledge.

    We (all) feel that Wiradjuri languagebelongs to the land and shows alsowhich part of the land you come from.

    We (all) really feel that we (all) shouldhave special place. Keeping (preserving)that our own people will look after/carefor our own Wiradjuri language andCultural Knowledge.

    A special place where we (all) can keepmaking Language-things (special), oursand Cultural Knowledge things ours also.

    5. MAJO

    R IN

    ITIATIVES

    19

    A

    31

    LOCAL DECISION MAKING

    Does a Charter or Terms of Reference exist thatdescribes how:

    decision-makers are selected, monitored, heldaccountable and replaced

    committee processes and decision makingrules operate

    dispute resolution and complaints handling aremanaged?

    Does the Regional Alliance meet regularly (i.e. at least monthly)?

    Has a Chairperson been elected?

    Has consultation commenced about priorities,regional alliance charters and operatingarrangements?

    Have key priorities been agreed to that theRegional Alliances will take into Accordnegotiations?

    Has the Regional Alliance made preparations to negotiate an Accord with the NSWGovernment?

    Are there auspicing arrangements in place thatmanage funding from Aboriginal Affairs on behalfof Regional Alliances?

    Are there existing partnerships and agreementswith state, federal or local governments?

    All three Regional Alliances have been hard atwork building their governance structures andpreparing to negotiate Accords with the NSWGovernment. The table below demonstrates howeach Regional Assembly is progressing.

    Key deliverables

    What have the Regional Alliances been working on?

    Murdi PaakiRegionalAssembly

    Illawarra andWingecarribee

    RegionalPartnershipAlliance

    RegionalAboriginal

    DevelopmentAssembly

    commenced commenced

    negotiationshave

    commenced

    agencypreparationunder way

    agencypreparationunder way

    RegionalPartnershipAgreement

    RegionalPartnershipAgreement

    RegionalPartnershipAgreement

    draftprepared

    draftprepared

    operatingunder interimarrangements

    3

    1. MINISTERS FOREWORD

    Aboriginal people in NSW come from strong, vibrantcultures some of the oldest living cultures in the world.They are proud of their rich history, their identity and thedeep spiritual connection they have with Country.Aboriginal people draw strength from that identity,knowing who they are and where they come from.

    As the First Peoples of our beautiful land, Aboriginalpeople have an important role to play in shaping theidentity of our state and our nation.

    The majority of Aboriginal people in NSW are livingproductive, fulfilling lives. However, we know that thereare still a significant number of Aboriginal people whodo not enjoy a standard of living comparable to that ofthe broader community.

    We Australians must strive for a society in whichdisparities between Aboriginal people and the broadercommunity no longer exist. To achieve this, we mustchart a course based on respect and mutualresponsibility.

    In the past, the language of Aboriginal affairs hasfocused on the gap and on disadvantage. Igenuinely believe that if we shift our terminology fromdisadvantage to advantage, that if we spend moretime celebrating our wonderful Aboriginal cultures andthe contribution they make to our collective Australianidentity, then it will be easier for the inner strength andresilience of Aboriginal communities to drive thesolutions to the challenges they face.

    This document represents a new beginning, for it hasbeen developed by Aboriginal communities andgovernment, working together. We have movedbeyond symbolic consultation. The Coalition ofAboriginal Peak Organisations, represented byStephen Ryan along with Professor Shane Houston,Maydina Penrith and Danny Lester, together withseven Cabinet Ministers, have worked over the pastyear, visiting, and listening to, Aboriginal peopleacross NSW. Their visions and aspirations form the

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 18

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    2. OCHRE identity

    &2/:[email protected]/-9773>7/8>>9./@/69:381+1/8?38/:+8/2,93/=>[email protected]/=38-6?.381"::9?83>C?,=988/->/.977?83>3/=+81?+1/+8.?6>?=+8.9-+6/-3=398 +538179./6=

    $"!! "$%$)%#"::9?83>C?,=+37>9:2/-9803./8-/+8.589A6/.1/>909669A+=?::9/.:+>2A+C,/>A//8=/-98.+=F-+6/+.>949,=

    D 7/8>9=/+-2=>/:90>2/A+C

    D /81+1381,9?./8>=+8.>2/3=F:398/.>9/7:69C7/8>

    )!! "$%$)%#"::9?83>C?,=90//.,+-502/8//.092A+C=>9+==3=>,92/>39809>/3+398>2/ 383=>/

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 19

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    2. OCHRE identity

    INDUSTRY DISCUSSION PAPER

    Aboriginal Economic DevelopmentPolicy and Action Plan

    This Discussion Paper seeks input on theproposed goals for NSW Aboriginal economicdevelopment and the proposed actions tosupport these goals. It also seeks comment on how the NSW Government, Aboriginalcommunities, non-government organisationsand the private sector can work in partnershipto achieve these goals.

    We greatly value your views on this topic andencourage both individuals and organisationsto make a submission. While there are anumber of questions in the paper, you neednot answer them all, and please feel free toraise any other related issues.

    Circle graphics

    textural imagery

    logo strip

    brushstroke keyline

    secondary Documentation - discussion Paper (cover)

    D

    %?==>

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 20

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    2. OCHRE identity

    Preamble

    Opportunity, Choice, Healing, Responsibility andEmpowerment (OCHRE), the NSW Government planfor Aboriginal affairs, includes the following economicdevelopment aims (p18):

    increase the number of Aboriginal peopleemployed; and

    increase the number of Aboriginal ownedbusinesses.

    Aboriginal Affairs recognises that contributing toimproved economic opportunities for Aboriginalpeople and communities is an important way toachieve OCHRE outcomes, and supports ourcommitment to work with Aboriginal communities toincrease their confidence, capacity and opportunity to determine their own futures. There is untappedpotential for Aboriginal enterprises to prosper, and through building networks, skills and leveringexperience and cultural strengths, Aboriginalenterprises can be a key driver of Aboriginal economic development.

    Agency procurement policy can include proactiveinitiatives that contribute to Aboriginal economicdevelopment and improved social outcomes. ThisPolicy Statement creates an opportunity to favour theuse of Aboriginal suppliers where possible, whilst alsoachieving key objectives of the Department ofEducation and Communities Procurement Policy1,including:

    Maintaining standards of transparency, probity,ethics and integrity;

    Driving value for money, ensuring quality goodsand services;

    Ensuring accountability;

    Committing to fair and effective competition; and

    Identifying sustainable and socially responsibleprocurement solutions.

    1 Aboriginal Affairs complies with the DEC Procurement Policy, and adopts this Policy Statement as a way to further support Aboriginaleconomic development. Should any inconsistency with the DEC Procurement Policy arise, the DEC Procurement Policy has precedence.

    Policy Statement

    Aboriginal Affairs will procure itsrequirements wherever possible fromrecognised Aboriginal businesses and suppliers.

    1. Aboriginal Affairs will identify sectors where thereare opportunities to increase the proportion ofcurrent spending through Aboriginal suppliers. The current identified sectors are:

    Research, evaluation and consultationcontractors;

    Catering;

    Stationery;

    Graphic design and publishing; and

    Office facilities services.

    In identified sectors, Aboriginal Affairs will initiatedemonstration projects in partnership withAboriginal suppliers to increase the procurement of goods and services supplied by Aboriginalbusinesses in that sector.

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 2

    textural strip

    2 column layout

    website bar

    secondary Documentation - sample text page

    a copy of this document is available to download athttp://www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au/aboriginal-affairs-procurement-policy

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 21

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    About OCHRE - a continuingconversation (OCC)

    in 2011, the nsW government and aboriginal

    communities started a conversation that resulted in the

    ochre initiatives. an important conversation is now

    underway to work out what the key issues are and to

    solve them, so that each local decision Making

    process, industry based agreement, language and

    Culture nest and Opportunity Hub develops with local

    aboriginal communities views in mind.

    these conversations form part of the accountability

    process set up to make sure that ochre operates and

    develops as intended.

    The OCC logo

    the OCC logo is available in two formats:

    Horizontal

    stacked

    3. OCHRE - a continuing conversation identity

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 22

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    OCC logo variations

    the OCC logo can appear in either positive or reverse

    colourways:

    positive

    When the positive version is used, the logo must

    appear on a white background.

    reverse

    the reverse version must appear on the turquoise

    colour background, supplied within the logo artwork.

    this should not be used as a block logo, but

    incorporated into the design using a turquoise

    background. For reference, please refer to pg 26 to

    see examples of the logo in action.

    3. OCHRE - a continuing conversation identity

    O LANGUAGE AND CULTURE NESTS

  • Correct usage

    Minimum clear space

    this is the area around the logo that must be left clear

    without text, imagery or other logos.

    similar to the main ochre logo, minimum clear space

    maintained around all edges of the logo must be no less

    than the HalF the height of the O in ochre.

    therefore, minimum space around the logo is indicated

    by the blue:

    Incorrect usage

    the same principles apply as outlined for the ochre logo

    - see page 7.

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 23

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    3. OCHRE - a continuing conversation identity

    2x

    x

    x

    x

    x

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 24

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    Colour palette

    For documents, graphics and materials created under the

    OCC identity, a specific colour palette has been developed

    to help bind the materials visually.

    the colours have been derived from a cool,

    coastally-inspired palette, and help support a more unified

    brand across multiple visual platforms.

    ample use of white space unifies the palette with contrast

    and vibrancy.

    additional colours and variations (tints and shades) of the

    Primary &secondary colours may be used within

    materials, however the specified above colours should

    form the main colour palette.

    3. OCHRE - a continuing conversation identity

    C100M85Y5

    K20

    PROPORTIONAL USAGE

    COLOUR BREAKDOWN (CMYK)

    C48M3Y16K0

    C70M15Y36K0

    C10M25Y100K0

    C25M25Y40K0

    C1M5Y8

    K10

    C

    PRIMARY SECONDARY

    TIONAL USAGEPROPORTIONAL USAGE

    YPRIMARR YSECONDARR

    COLOUR BREAKDOWN (CMYK)COLOUR BREAKDOWN (CMYK)

    K0Y16M3C48

    K20Y5

    M85C100

    K0Y100M25C10

    K0Y36M15C70

    K0Y40M25C25

    K0Y100M25C10

    K10Y8M5C1

  • Typography

    refer to pages 9 & 10.

    Supporting graphics

    refer to pages 11-13. adjust colours where needed to suit

    the OCC colour palatte.

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 25

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

  • Supporting graphics in action

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 26

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    3. OCHRE - a continuing conversation identity

    INDUSTRY BASED AGREEMENTS LOCAL DECISION MAKING OPPORTUNITY HUBS LANGUAGE AND CULTURE NESTS

    kim Heeley artwork stripbrushstroke keyline

    textural imagery

    textural graphic

    logo strip

    brushstroke keyline

    a full copy of this report is available to download athttp://www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au/ochre-annual-reports

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 27

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    3. OCHRE - a continuing conversation identity

    Be part of the conversation aboutthe Wiradjuri Aboriginal Languageand Culture Nest

    Ilan Katz and BJ Newton from the Social Policy Research Centre

    at the University of NSW Australia are coming to Dubbo on

    Thursday 19 May to introduce themselves and talk about the

    best way for you and your communities to be part of the

    conversations about how the Wiradjuri Aboriginal Language and

    Culture Nest has been set up and is working.

    These conversations will help find out about issues and solve

    them as they arise rather than leaving them to the last minute.

    You can also find out more about the conversations at:

    As someone interested in the Wiradjuri Language it would be

    great if you could come to the meeting and let Ilan and BJ know

    your views.

    Meeting details:

    Date: Thursday 19 May, 2:00pm 4:00pm

    Venue: Yarradamarra Centre

    (TAFE Western Myall Street Campus), Dubbo

    Afternoon tea will be provided.

    Please let Michael Newman (Aboriginal Affairs) know if you are

    able to make the meeting.at

    [email protected]

    or call 5852 1067.

    To find out more about what the meeting is about,

    contact Ilan at [email protected] or call (02) 9385 7810.

    Ilan is the professor leadingthe team working on theOCHRE conversations. Ilan isan experienced social workerand researcher and has led anumber of projects looking atAboriginal policy, includingincome management, CapeYork welfare reform trials,and Aboriginal and TorresStrait Islander social andemotional wellbeing.

    BJ is a Wiradjuri woman wholives in Sydney. Her familycome from ErambieAboriginal Reserve at WestCowra. BJ has worked as aresearcher at the SocialPolicy Research Centre since2010. BJ is undertaking aPhD exploring Aboriginalparents views on child safetyand wellbeing.

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au/ochre-a-continuing-conversation/

    kim Heeley artwork stripbrushstroke keyline

    textural imagery

    textural graphic

    logo strip

    brushstroke keyline

    a full copy of this report is available to download athttp://www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au/ochre-annual-reports

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 28

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    3. OCHRE - a continuing conversation identity

    A message to community from the Minister

    for Aboriginal Affairs, Leslie Williams to the

    Aboriginal communities of NSW

    OCHRE evaluation puts Aboriginal communities in the drivers seat.

    In 2011 the NSW Government and you, Aboriginal peoples living in NSW, started a conversation about

    a new approach to Aboriginal affairs.

    The result was OCHRE, our community focused plan for Aboriginal affairs.

    OCHRE is our commitment to a different relationship between the NSW Government and the Aborignalpeooples. A relationship where government seeks to respond to, and meet, your hopes and aspirations.

    OCHRE doesnt make bold statements about changing the world overnight, or even within ageneration. We deliberately acknowledge that it will take time to reach the destination where Aboriginal

    and non-Aboriginal Australians achieve an equal footing.

    We are now in the third year of OCHRE and important conversations are underway to find out the keyissues and opportunities for each intitative.

    The conversations are intended to find their strengths so that each develops in a way that addresses

    local and community needs. We are committed to an open and long-term dialogue. This is a 10 year

    conversation - long enough to learn about what work, what doesnt, whats been the impact, and what

    we need to place greater focus on. The Social Policy Research Centre at the UNSW is leading this work.

    I invite you to take part in these important converstions so that your voice can help to determine the

    shape of the future.

    I give you my commitment that the NSW Government will continue the respectful converstation started

    in 2011. It is my job to advocate to the NSW Cabinet for OCHRE to develop with your views in mind.

    16 March 2016

    kim Heeley artwork stripbrushstroke keyline

    textural imagery

    textural graphic

    logo strip

    brushstroke keyline

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 29

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

    3. ProtoCoLs for use

    the following protocols will provide direction to aboriginal

    affairs staff and those who access aboriginal affairs

    branding to ensure the production of high-quality

    communication materials, correct application of aboriginal

    affairs branding and adherence to aboriginal affairs

    approval processes.

    We communicate our values through our brand. a brand is

    more than just a logo it is about an organisations values

    and beliefs and how it wishes to be thought of and

    perceived.

    Our brand reflects our core values and gives us a common

    base for clear, consistent, unified, credible and effective

    communication.

    research shows that without a strong and consistent

    brand, we risk giving out conflicting and confusing

    messages both internally and externally.

    a consistent and unified brand will improve awareness and

    understanding of our vision internally and externally. it will

    also improve our reputation.

    aboriginal affairs has one main brand (the aa corporate

    branding, including the hand logo) and three sub-brands

    which are:

    ochre

    all research and evaluation publications

    Family records

    if your project/program does not fall under one of the

    sub-brands, please defer to the main aa brand.

    if you require guidance about which branding is appropriate

    to use, please discuss with director, strategy and

    Coordination.

  • logos

    Please talk to the director, strategy and Coordination if you

    need to send logos out to third parties to ensure the logos

    are used appropriately.

    Please note: This does not include recipients of NAIDoc

    Grants, who will receive the logos and a copy of Aboriginal

    Affairs brand guidelines on acceptance of funding.

    logos are saved here:

    \\pw0000fileaa01.central.det.win\data\qt_aadata\teMPlat

    e\lOgOs

    other Branding Issues

    if there is a question about which branding should be used

    or where it is appropriate to use branding, please see the

    director, strategy and Coordination.

    www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au 30

    ochre: brand identity guidelines

  • www.aboriginalaffairs.nsw.gov.au