Beyond the Scope of the Article

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<ul><li><p>Beyond the Scope of the ArticleAuthor(s): Lynton K. CaldwellSource: Public Administration Review, Vol. 37, No. 1 (Jan. - Feb., 1977), pp. 125-126Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Society for Public AdministrationStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/974526 .Accessed: 14/06/2014 01:51</p><p>Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms &amp; Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p> .JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.</p><p> .</p><p>Wiley and American Society for Public Administration are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve andextend access to Public Administration Review.</p><p>http://www.jstor.org </p><p>This content downloaded from 62.122.73.34 on Sat, 14 Jun 2014 01:51:05 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=blackhttp://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=aspahttp://www.jstor.org/stable/974526?origin=JSTOR-pdfhttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsphttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p></li><li><p>COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS </p><p>Immigration and Naturalization Service. This was Richard J. Stillman's item on "The Bureaucracy Problem at DOJ." The author points up a number of areas needing atten- tion, and his suggested remedies have merit. Heavy work- loads at INS and DEA impair the effectiveness of these divisions. A recent news item states that the Center for National Security Studies urges the abolition of the agency as ineffective, referring to LEAA. If reducing crime is an aim of this division, its efforts have been for naught. </p><p>Why was DOJ allowed to drift into this mess? What have top management and management program staffs been doing all these years? Why hasn't attention from OMF and OPP been more effective in solving problems? Likewise, what have the Comptroller General and the Senate and House Judiciary Committees been doing in exercising oversight over DOJ? </p><p>Trying to remedy the situation at DOJ may be an exercise in futility, but the poor taxpayer deserves to have some action to shake up the structure. </p><p>Shifting to a happier vein, another article in PAR No. 4 by John A. Rohr entitled "The Study of Ethics in the P.A. Curriculum" examines conflicting interpretations of values and the administrator's role in analyzing of possible positions in order to make "the right choice." Courses in ethics, embracing so-called "situation ethics" problems appear to be a worthwhile addition to the P.A. curricu- lum. </p><p>Keep the good articles coming. </p><p>F. Louis Valla Long Beach, California </p><p>Immigration and Naturalization Service. This was Richard J. Stillman's item on "The Bureaucracy Problem at DOJ." The author points up a number of areas needing atten- tion, and his suggested remedies have merit. Heavy work- loads at INS and DEA impair the effectiveness of these divisions. A recent news item states that the Center for National Security Studies urges the abolition of the agency as ineffective, referring to LEAA. If reducing crime is an aim of this division, its efforts have been for naught. </p><p>Why was DOJ allowed to drift into this mess? What have top management and management program staffs been doing all these years? Why hasn't attention from OMF and OPP been more effective in solving problems? Likewise, what have the Comptroller General and the Senate and House Judiciary Committees been doing in exercising oversight over DOJ? </p><p>Trying to remedy the situation at DOJ may be an exercise in futility, but the poor taxpayer deserves to have some action to shake up the structure. </p><p>Shifting to a happier vein, another article in PAR No. 4 by John A. Rohr entitled "The Study of Ethics in the P.A. Curriculum" examines conflicting interpretations of values and the administrator's role in analyzing of possible positions in order to make "the right choice." Courses in ethics, embracing so-called "situation ethics" problems appear to be a worthwhile addition to the P.A. curricu- lum. </p><p>Keep the good articles coming. </p><p>F. Louis Valla Long Beach, California </p><p>Immigration and Naturalization Service. This was Richard J. Stillman's item on "The Bureaucracy Problem at DOJ." The author points up a number of areas needing atten- tion, and his suggested remedies have merit. Heavy work- loads at INS and DEA impair the effectiveness of these divisions. A recent news item states that the Center for National Security Studies urges the abolition of the agency as ineffective, referring to LEAA. If reducing crime is an aim of this division, its efforts have been for naught. </p><p>Why was DOJ allowed to drift into this mess? What have top management and management program staffs been doing all these years? Why hasn't attention from OMF and OPP been more effective in solving problems? Likewise, what have the Comptroller General and the Senate and House Judiciary Committees been doing in exercising oversight over DOJ? </p><p>Trying to remedy the situation at DOJ may be an exercise in futility, but the poor taxpayer deserves to have some action to shake up the structure. </p><p>Shifting to a happier vein, another article in PAR No. 4 by John A. Rohr entitled "The Study of Ethics in the P.A. Curriculum" examines conflicting interpretations of values and the administrator's role in analyzing of possible positions in order to make "the right choice." Courses in ethics, embracing so-called "situation ethics" problems appear to be a worthwhile addition to the P.A. curricu- lum. </p><p>Keep the good articles coming. </p><p>F. Louis Valla Long Beach, California </p><p>Immigration and Naturalization Service. This was Richard J. Stillman's item on "The Bureaucracy Problem at DOJ." The author points up a number of areas needing atten- tion, and his suggested remedies have merit. Heavy work- loads at INS and DEA impair the effectiveness of these divisions. A recent news item states that the Center for National Security Studies urges the abolition of the agency as ineffective, referring to LEAA. If reducing crime is an aim of this division, its efforts have been for naught. </p><p>Why was DOJ allowed to drift into this mess? What have top management and management program staffs been doing all these years? Why hasn't attention from OMF and OPP been more effective in solving problems? Likewise, what have the Comptroller General and the Senate and House Judiciary Committees been doing in exercising oversight over DOJ? </p><p>Trying to remedy the situation at DOJ may be an exercise in futility, but the poor taxpayer deserves to have some action to shake up the structure. </p><p>Shifting to a happier vein, another article in PAR No. 4 by John A. Rohr entitled "The Study of Ethics in the P.A. Curriculum" examines conflicting interpretations of values and the administrator's role in analyzing of possible positions in order to make "the right choice." Courses in ethics, embracing so-called "situation ethics" problems appear to be a worthwhile addition to the P.A. curricu- lum. </p><p>Keep the good articles coming. </p><p>F. Louis Valla Long Beach, California </p><p>Need for a Shift Toward Public Administration Leadership </p><p>Mr. Valla's questions about the U.S. Department of Justice are justified. More citizens should complain about the non-performance and misuse of taxpayer's money at that agency. He also correctly refers to the apparent prob- lems of "drift" and lack of effective oversight by the Judiciary Committees in Congress as well as by the Attorney General and his staff. As I pointed out in my article, much of this oversight problem stems from the weltanschauung of the lawyers who are in charge and who perceive that the problems in Justice should be handled on a case-by-case, crisis-by-crisis basis rather than from a policy-management-planning vantage point. DOJ requires a big shift away from legal oversight toward public admin- istration leadership. </p><p>Richard Stillman, II Professor of Public Administration </p><p>California State College, Bakersfield </p><p>Need for a Shift Toward Public Administration Leadership </p><p>Mr. Valla's questions about the U.S. Department of Justice are justified. More citizens should complain about the non-performance and misuse of taxpayer's money at that agency. He also correctly refers to the apparent prob- lems of "drift" and lack of effective oversight by the Judiciary Committees in Congress as well as by the Attorney General and his staff. As I pointed out in my article, much of this oversight problem stems from the weltanschauung of the lawyers who are in charge and who perceive that the problems in Justice should be handled on a case-by-case, crisis-by-crisis basis rather than from a policy-management-planning vantage point. DOJ requires a big shift away from legal oversight toward public admin- istration leadership. </p><p>Richard Stillman, II Professor of Public Administration </p><p>California State College, Bakersfield </p><p>Need for a Shift Toward Public Administration Leadership </p><p>Mr. Valla's questions about the U.S. Department of Justice are justified. More citizens should complain about the non-performance and misuse of taxpayer's money at that agency. He also correctly refers to the apparent prob- lems of "drift" and lack of effective oversight by the Judiciary Committees in Congress as well as by the Attorney General and his staff. As I pointed out in my article, much of this oversight problem stems from the weltanschauung of the lawyers who are in charge and who perceive that the problems in Justice should be handled on a case-by-case, crisis-by-crisis basis rather than from a policy-management-planning vantage point. DOJ requires a big shift away from legal oversight toward public admin- istration leadership. </p><p>Richard Stillman, II Professor of Public Administration </p><p>California State College, Bakersfield </p><p>Need for a Shift Toward Public Administration Leadership </p><p>Mr. Valla's questions about the U.S. Department of Justice are justified. More citizens should complain about the non-performance and misuse of taxpayer's money at that agency. He also correctly refers to the apparent prob- lems of "drift" and lack of effective oversight by the Judiciary Committees in Congress as well as by the Attorney General and his staff. As I pointed out in my article, much of this oversight problem stems from the weltanschauung of the lawyers who are in charge and who perceive that the problems in Justice should be handled on a case-by-case, crisis-by-crisis basis rather than from a policy-management-planning vantage point. DOJ requires a big shift away from legal oversight toward public admin- istration leadership. </p><p>Richard Stillman, II Professor of Public Administration </p><p>California State College, Bakersfield </p><p>Optimistic and Pessimistic Conclusions </p><p>To the Editor: </p><p>While appreciative of PAR's foresight in publishing an article with hindsight ("Novus Ordo Seclorum: The Heri- tage of American Public Administration"), certain con- </p><p>Optimistic and Pessimistic Conclusions </p><p>To the Editor: </p><p>While appreciative of PAR's foresight in publishing an article with hindsight ("Novus Ordo Seclorum: The Heri- tage of American Public Administration"), certain con- </p><p>Optimistic and Pessimistic Conclusions </p><p>To the Editor: </p><p>While appreciative of PAR's foresight in publishing an article with hindsight ("Novus Ordo Seclorum: The Heri- tage of American Public Administration"), certain con- </p><p>Optimistic and Pessimistic Conclusions </p><p>To the Editor: </p><p>While appreciative of PAR's foresight in publishing an article with hindsight ("Novus Ordo Seclorum: The Heri- tage of American Public Administration"), certain con- </p><p>clusions drawn by Lynton K. Caldwell seem, on the one hand, too optimistic, while on the other, implicit to the article, is an unwarranted pessimism. </p><p>Obscured in the analysis is the observation that while the founders were "not notably egalitarian ...," "equality has been a generally accepted value" (p. 483). It is more accurate to state that the founders were elitists by any current standard to the extent of restricting the vote to "electors" - generally white, male, protestant, prop- erty holders of a certain age. This effectively excluded females, small farmers, indentured whites, slaves, and Indians from exercising any sovereignty whatsoever. Thus the origins of the country are, to an extent, understated by Caldwell and unappreciated; generally, "undemo- cratic." </p><p>The author is clearly aware of this general problem area as evidenced by his specification of two serious "constitutional" issues which could not be anticipated. He concludes that as political franchise was extended, it did not adequately define "... the obligations of the citizen to society ..." (p. 486). This is too optimistic in that even as Caldwell articulates the second "closely related" challenge as "... the relationship between public and private power - primarily economic power" (p. 486), the complexities of the issue are glossed over. </p><p>The equivalence the founders drew between personal freedom and private property rights is an actual dilemma. Changed circumstances, including an increased conscious- ness of scarcity, have demonstrated that private property rights and human rights (including personal freedom) are not one and the same thing. It is clear that the unending pursuit of material wealth entails, to some noticeable degree, necessary denials of human rights in the interest of America's continued economic prosperity. A continu- ally violated right is, for example, freedom from natural pollution. In the case of some Americans and "citizens" of many other countries as well, the violations are of direct political rights such as freedom of speech or the right to vote. This raises doubts about one of America's traditional conceits "... we are acting for all mankind" (p. 477). </p><p>Since the author is undoubtedly aware of the dilemmas, even stated in the above terms, he is pessimistic in the reluctance to confront the tension between indi- vidual liberty and private property rights directly. Whether this is a pessimism about the acceptability of a view that has profoundly complicated overtones, the ability of PAR readers to process this type of analysis, or the avoidance of an issue so crucial to the future but so apparently intractable as to threaten the very viability of the "Novus Ordo Seclorum" is difficult to judge. </p><p>Geoff Gallas University of Southern California </p><p>clusions drawn by Lynton K. Caldwell seem, on the one hand, too optimistic, while on the other, implicit to the article, is an unwarranted pessimism. </p><p>Obscured in the analysis is the observation that while the founders were "not notably egalitarian ...," "equality has been a generally accepted value" (p. 483). It is more accurate to state that t...</p></li></ul>

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