better science through art

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Common wisdom says that science and art are entirely different beasts; moreover, a similar source of wisdom tells us that science is valuable to society while art is a luxury. Why else would schools drop art from their curricula over the past 20 years?But artists and scientists approach their work in similar if not identical ways.This presentation was created by Richard P Gabriel and presented at IME-USP - So Paulo on 31/Mar/2011 sponsored by CCSLRichard's BioRichard P. Gabriel (Ph.D., Stanford University, 1981; MFA Creative Writing (Poetry), Warren Wilson College, 1998; ACM Fellow) performs programming language, creativity, and software engineering research at IBM Research. He is the author of five books. He played lead guitar in a rock n roll band for 20 years.

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  • 1.Richard P. Gabriel Kevin J. Sullivan Dream Songs, Inc.University of VirginiaUBetter Science Through Art

2. Only mystery enables us to live. Federico Garcia Lorca 3. Only mystery enables us to live. Only mystery. Federico Garcia Lorca 4. Prefrontal lightningbolt too lazy to chew the sphinxs loudest eyelashNot even if it shushes you with a mast of sneersDown which grateful bankvault-doors scamperBecause of a doublejointedness that glows in the darkLike a soliloquy of walnutsNumbed by beaks of headless measuringtapeSo the lubriciousness can tower in peaceLike a buzzsaw trapped in a perfumery of shrugsLemonOr limeOnly a maze can remember your hair of buttered blowgunsBill Knott, Nights of Naomi 5. ; T ok ; ; eS; ; x (x) [GT-Var] [GT-Cast] ; ; (T)e T T includes init(S); ;e S ; T ok [GT-New] ; ; new T(e) T annotate [e :: S]elds(N) = T f ; ;e T T nogiftlistcat list | grep nice > giftlistsanta claus townwho | grep sleepingwho | grep awakewho | egrep bad|goodfor (goodness sake) {be good} add a lot of art 52. Stopping by http://babelfish.altavista.com on a Snowy EveningHere is a task whose outcome is certain:Thinking of someones forestand then thinking whether this forest is that someones.And as for his house (Ive picked this up):it is certainly located in town.I am stopped here paying attention to the snow above,observing the trees filling in above the snow.My eye finds comfort in this.As for my horse, he strangely and narrowly stops.I am small, me and the small end of the tree both agree.To the horse, we are stopped between a farm and the frozen sea.This evening is the strangest and the darkest of the year, the horse must think.His harness bells are his only user interface.These bells are installed to a flange by some wiring, and sohe gives the flange a shock, vibrating the wires,thereby jolting the bells (giving them a restlessness)in order to pose me a question:Is there some kind of mistake here?Surely a certain error exists.He is a small horse. 53. There is only one other sound,a different sound like a clay tone,but only to the extent of a thin layer or a languid ribbonforming a closed loop: the sweepback of a light breezeover downy soft flakesa simple, easy wind;flakes like cotton wool or hairor a rag for cleaning, which is the same thing.Or maybe it sounds like this:khlop!(I am excited by this.)Woods are attractive. Likable. Lovable, even.Or sometimesobscure. One of the treesis dark and from a place which is deep.And you know what they say: Dark and deep are deep.But I am held to obligations which I must maintain.Before I sleep I must resume my outward journey.(And other unspecified things of the same class.) 54. There is only one other sound,a different sound like a clay tone,but only to the extent of a thin layer or a languid ribbonforming a closed loop: the sweepback of a light breezeover downy soft flakesa simple, easy wind;flakes like cotton wool or hairor a rag for cleaning, which is the same thing.Or maybe it sounds like this:khlop!(I am excited by this.)Woods are attractive. Likable. Lovable, even.Or sometimesobscure. One of the treesis dark and from a place which is deep.And you know what they say: Dark and deep are deep.But I am held to obligations which I must maintain.Before I sleep I must resume my outward journey.(And other unspecified things of the same class.)written with the use of translation-based defamiliarization 55. Stopping By Woods on a Snowy EveningWhose woods these are I think I know.His house is in the village though;He will not see me stopping hereTo watch his woods fill up with snow.My little horse must think it queerTo stop without a farmhouse nearBetween the woods and frozen lakeThe darkest evening of the year.He gives his harness bells a shakeTo ask if there is some mistake.The only other sounds the sweepOf easy wind and downy flake.The woods are lovely, dark and deep.But I have promises to keep,And miles to go before I sleep,And miles to go before I sleep. 56. Stopping By Woods on a Snowy EveningWhose woods these are I think I know.His house is in the village though;He will not see me stopping hereTo watch his woods fill up with snow.My little horse must think it queerTo stop without a farmhouse nearBetween the woods and frozen lakeThe darkest evening of the year.He gives his harness bells a shakeTo ask if there is some mistake.The only other sounds the sweepOf easy wind and downy flake.The woods are lovely, dark and deep.But I have promises to keep,And miles to go before I sleep,And miles to go before I sleep.Robert Frost, New Hampshire 57. Stopping By Woods on a Snowy EveningWhose woods these are I think I know.His house is in the village though;He will not see me stopping hereTo watch his woods fill up with snow.My little horse must think it queer ]To stop without a farmhouse nearBetween the woods and frozen lakeThe darkest evening of the year.He gives his harness bells a shakeTo ask if there is some mistake.The only other sounds the sweepOf easy wind and downy flake.The woods are lovely, dark and deep.But I have promises to keep,And miles to go before I sleep,And miles to go before I sleep. Robert Frost, New Hampshire 58. Experimental vsConceptual This is a distinction like that between artistic and scientific Or iterative versus waterfall 59. Experimental ArtistsArtists who have produced experimental innovations havebeen motivated by aesthetic criteria: they have aimed atpresenting visual perceptions. Their goals are imprecise, sotheir procedure is tentative and incremental. The imprecisionof their goals means that these artists rarely feel they havesucceeded, and their careers are consequently oftendominated by the pursuit of a single objective. David W. Galenson, Old Mastersand Young Geniuses 60. Conceptual ArtistsIn contrast, artists who have made conceptual innovationshave been motivated by the desire to communicate specificideas or emotions. Their goals for a particular work canusually be stated precisely, before its production, either as adesired image or a desired process for the works execution.Conceptual artists consequently make detailed preparatorysketches of plans for their paintings. David W. Galenson, Old Mastersand Young Geniuses 61. Conceptual ArtistsFor conceptual artists, planning is the most important stage.Before he begins working, the conceptual artist wants tohave a clear vision either of the completed work or of theprocess that will produce it. Conceptual artists consequentlyoften make detailed preparatory sketches or other plans for apainting. With the difficult decisions already made in theplanning stage, working and stopping are straightforward.The artist executes the plan and stops when he hascompleted it. David W. Galenson, Old Mastersand Young Geniuses 62. Experimental ArtistsFor experimental artists, planning a painting is unimportant.The subject selected might be simply a convenient object ofstudy, and frequently the artist returns to work on a motif hehas used in the past. Some experimental painters beginwithout a specific subject in mind, preferring instead to let thesubject emerge as they work. Experimental painters rarelymake elaborate preparatory sketches. Their most importantdecisions are made during the working stage. The artisttypically alternates between applying paint and examiningthe emerging image; at each point, how he develops theimage depends on his reaction to what he sees. David W. Galenson, Old Mastersand Young Geniuses 63. Conceptual Artists...extreme practitioners...make all the decisions for a workbefore beginning it. It is unclear, however, if this is literallypossible. There are artists who came close to it, and perhapsachieved it, during the 1960s, by making plans for their workand having these plans executed by others. David W. Galenson, Old Mastersand Young Geniuses 64. Professional vsCompulsive Programmers Joseph Weizenbaum Computer Power and Human Reason 1976 Eliza Weizenbaum hated Stallman 65. The ordinary [professional] programmer will...generally dolengthy preparatory work, such as writing and flow diagramming,before beginning work with the computer itself. His sessions withthe computer may be comparatively short. He may even letothers do the actual console work. He develops his programslowly and systematically. When something doesnt work, hemay spend considerable time away from the computer framingcareful hypotheses to account for the malfunction and designingcrucial experiments to test them....When he has finallycomposed the program he set out to produce, he is able tocomplete a sensible description of it and turn his attention toother things. Joseph Weizenbaum, ComputerPower and Human Reason 66. The compulsive programmer is usually a superbtechnician,...one how knows every detail of the computer heworks on, its peripheral equipment, the computers operatingsystem, etc....He can write small subsystem programs quickly,that is, in one or two sessions of, say, 20 hours each....His maininterest...is in very large, very ambitious systems of programs....[T]he systems he undertakes to build have very grandiose butextremely imprecisely stated goals. Some examples...are: newcomputer languages to facilitate man-machine communication; ageneral system that can be taught to play any board game; asystem to make it easier for computer experts to write super-systems.Joseph Weizenbaum, Computer Power and Human Reason 67. The compulsive programmer...calls what he does hacking....Hecannot set before himself a clearly defined long-term goal and aplan for achieving it, for he has only technique, not knowledge.He has nothing he can analyze or synthesize; in short, he hasnothing to form theories about....(It has to be said that not all hackers are pathologicallycompulsive programmers. Indeed, were it not for the often, in itsown terms, highly creative labor of people who proudly claim thetitle hacker, few of todays sophisticated computer time-sharingsystems, computer language translators, computer gr