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  • CRC for Water Sensitive Cities | 1

    Benchmarking, Envisioning and Transition Planning for a Water Sensitive Bendigo: Final Case Report

    CRCWSC Integrated Research Project 1: WSC Visions and Transition Strategies

  • 2 | Benchmarking, Envisioning and Transition Planning for a Water Sensitive Bendigo

    Benchmarking, Envisioning and Transition Planning for a Water Sensitive Bendigo: Final Case Report Water sensitive city visions and transition strategies (IRP1) IRP1-4-2018 Authors Briony Rogers1,2, Alex Gunn1,2, Emma Church1,2, Katie Hammer1,2, Jo Lindsay1,2 1 School of Social Sciences, Monash University 2 CRC for Water Sensitive Cities © 2018 Cooperative Research Centre for Water Sensitive Cities Ltd. This work is copyright. Apart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part of it may be reproduced by any process without written permission from the publisher. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction rights should be directed to the publisher. Publisher Cooperative Research Centre for Water Sensitive Cities Level 1, 8 Scenic Blvd, Clayton Campus Monash University Clayton, VIC 3800 p. +61 3 9902 4985 e. admin@crcwsc.org.au w. www.watersensitivecities.org.au Date of publication: September 2018 An appropriate citation for this document is: Rogers, B.C., Gunn, A., Church, E., Hammer, K., and Lindsay, J. (2018). Benchmarking, Envisioning and Transition Planning for a Water Sensitive Bendigo: Final Case Report. Melbourne, Australia: Cooperative Research Centre for Water Sensitive Cities. Acknowledgements The authors thank the project participants for bringing their enthusiasm, creativity and strategic insight to the workshop series and for their input into the development of this report. We also acknowledge the significant input of the project’s local steering committee in Bendigo. The authors would also like to thank David McCubbin for providing the illustrations in this report. His contribution to this project is greatly appreciated. We also thank Professor Nigel Bertram, Catherine Murphy and the Monash Art Design and Architecture team for their contributions to the community workshop series and the spatial representations of Bendigo’s water story and vision in this report. Finally, we greatly appreciate the expertise, advice and support on community engagement from Associate Professor Kelly Fielding and Dr Angela Dean at the University of Queensland. Disclaimer The CRC for Water Sensitive Cities has endeavored to ensure that all information in this publication is correct. It makes no warranty with regard to the accuracy of the information provided and will not be liable if the information is inaccurate, incomplete or out of date nor be liable for any direct or indirect damages arising from its use. The contents of this publication should not be used as a substitute for seeking independent professional advice.

    mailto:admin@crcwsc.org.au http://www.watersensitivecities.org.au/

  • CRC for Water Sensitive Cities | 3

    Table of contents

    1. Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 5

    1.1. Background ................................................................................................................... 5

    1.2. About this report ............................................................................................................ 6

    2. Bendigo’s water story............................................................................................................ 16

    2.1. Looking from the past to today .......................................................................................... 16

    2.2. Why we love Bendigo today .............................................................................................. 26

    2.3. Towards 2068 ................................................................................................................... 27

    3. Bendigo’s water sensitive vision ......................................................................................... 34

    4. Assessing Bendigo’s current water sensitive performance ............................................. 42

    4.1. WSC Index Framework ............................................................................................... 42

    4.2. WSC Index indicator scores ........................................................................................ 45

    4.3. Bendigo’s benchmarked city state .............................................................................. 47

    5. Advancing Bendigo’s transition to individual vision outcomes ....................................... 50

    5.1. Analysis of Bendigo’s current transition progress to vision outcomes ........................ 50

    5.2. Transition strategies and actions to achieve vision outcomes .................................... 73

    5.3 Actions to support community engagement .............................................................. 124

    6. Advancing Bendigo’s overall water sensitive city transition .......................................... 127

    6.1. Analysis of Bendigo’s current transition progress to the overall vision ..................... 127

    6.2. Overarching priority strategies to achieve the overall vision .................................... 128

    6.3. Towards a transition governance model ................................................................... 132

    7. Conclusion ............................................................................................................................ 134

    8. References ............................................................................................................................ 136

    Appendix 1: List of Workshop Participants ................................................................................... 139

    Appendix 2: WSC Index Scoring Process and Justification of Results ...................................... 142

    Appendix 3: Prioritisation of WSC Index indicators ...................................................................... 160

    Appendix 4: Transition Dynamics Framework Matrices and Evidence ....................................... 162

  • 4 | Benchmarking, Envisioning and Transition Planning for a Water Sensitive Bendigo

    Glossary / List of Abbreviations Council, COGB City of Greater Bendigo

    CRCWSC Cooperative Research Centre for Water Sensitive Cities

    Dja Dja Wurrung Used as an entity, referring to the Dja Dja Wurrung Clans Aboriginal Corporation, which is recognised as the Traditional Owner Group for the area comprising Bendigo

    Djandak Dja Dja Wurrung Enterprises Pty Ltd, trading as Djandak, is the commercial arm of Dja Dja Wurrung Clans Aboriginal Corporation (DDWCAC), which represents the Traditional Owners of the region, covering North-Central Victoria.

    IRP1 CRCWSC Integrated Research Project 1 Water Sensitive City Visions and Transition Strategies (https://watersensitivecities.org.au/content/project-irp1/)

    IWM Integrated Water Management

    NCCMA North Central Catchment Management Authority

    Transition A fundamental shift in cultures, structures and practices as society changes from one pattern of socio-technological development to another usually more sustainable pattern

    Transition Dynamics Framework

    A framework that conceptualises how system-wide changes in practice (e.g. the transition to water sensitive practices) unfold over time, based on the establishment of key enabling factors: individual and organisational champions, platforms for connecting, science and knowledge, projects and applications, and tools and instruments

    WSC Water Sensitive City; a WSC provides water system services in a way that reflects an integrated approach to infrastructure, the built form, the environment, governance and community, in order to deliver outcomes that support the enduring sustainability, liveability, resilience and productivity for a place’s community and ecosystems

    WSUD Water Sensitive Urban Design; an approach to the planning, design and maintenance of urban landscapes that will deliver WSCs through protecting and enhancing natural water systems and integrating the management of the total water cycle

    WSC Index A tool to benchmark and diagnose the water sensitive performance of a place (from the municipal to metropolitan scale), based on 34 indicators; good water sensitive governance, community capital, and equity of essential services, productivity and resource efficiency, ecosystem health, quality urban space, and adaptive infrastructure.

  • CRC for Water Sensitive Cities | 5

    1. Introduction

    1.1. Background

    As cities and towns globally are grappling with the challenges of climate change and rapid urbanisation, practitioners, decision-makers and academics are recognising the importance of water in supporting urban liveability, sustainability and resilience for a city’s long-term prosperity.

    In Australia, the concept of the water sensitive city (WSC) is now widely used to represent an aspirational city-state, where water has a central role in shaping a city. In a water sensitive city, people can enjoy reliable water supplies, effective sanitation, protection from flooding, healthy ecosystems, cool green landscapes, efficient use of resources, and beautiful urban spaces that feature water and bring t