audio production audio engineer: selects the proper microphones and places them on the set. they...

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Audio Production Audio engineer: selects the proper microphones and places them on the set. They also set each level on the audio mixer and then operate the audio mixer during the actual production. They must balance all audio levels including pre-recorded sounds (audio special effects, I pods, CD’s ) with the voice levels during the recording. They must also “strike the set” at the end and wrap up all cables, put mics away, take out batteries. Etc.

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Post on 24-Dec-2015

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  • Slide 1
  • Audio Production Audio engineer: selects the proper microphones and places them on the set. They also set each level on the audio mixer and then operate the audio mixer during the actual production. They must balance all audio levels including pre-recorded sounds (audio special effects, I pods, CDs ) with the voice levels during the recording. They must also strike the set at the end and wrap up all cables, put mics away, take out batteries. Etc.
  • Slide 2
  • Audio Terms: VU meter: an audio meter which measures the intensity of sound in volume units. Could be a series of green lights that turn to red or an actual meter. Acceptable level is 80 to 100% modulation with occasional peaks into the red.
  • Slide 3
  • What does a microphone do? The mic is a transducer, in other words, an energy converter. It senses acoustical energy (sound) and translates it into equivalent electrical energy.
  • Slide 4
  • Microphones have different Pick-up patterns: Audio pick up refers to how the microphone responds to sounds coming from different directions. There are two general types: Omni-directional: (all) the microphone will receive sounds from all sides equally without favoring sounds from any particular direction (angle) Uni-directional: (one) most sensitive to sounds emanating from one direction and to reject sounds coming from the rear and sides of the mic.
  • Slide 5
  • Pick up patterns:
  • Slide 6
  • Just as there are different pick- up patterns, there are also different types of microphones Lavalier (lapel) mic can be clipped onto the lapel of a coat, shirt or a tie. Omnidirectional. Good for studio interview
  • Slide 7
  • Parabolic mic A parabolic microphone :uses a parabolic reflector to collect and focus sound waves onto a receiver, in much the same way that a parabolic antenna (e.g., satellite dish) does with radio waves. Typical uses of this microphone, which has unusually focused front sensitivity and can pick up sounds from many metres away, include nature recording, field audio for sports broadcasting, eavesdropping (and law enforcement. parabolic reflector soundparabolic antennasatellite dishradio waves recordingeavesdropping
  • Slide 8
  • Hand Held Microphones Good for interviews, omnidirectional, good for sounds that are close to the sound source and for videos that is it acceptable to see the microphone in the shot.
  • Slide 9
  • BOOM mic Position the mic so that it is just out of camera range but where it can still pick up sound, most common is a hand held on a fish pole.
  • Slide 10
  • PZM or boundary mic Sometimes called a conference mic, lays flat on a table and can be used when there are not enough inputs on the audio mixer for every person to have their own microphone. Good back up mic for when you do not know what the format of the program will be and you do not know the order of the speakers.
  • Slide 11
  • Shot gun mic Can be used as a boom on a pole Highly direction pick up pattern It can pick up sounds from a distance
  • Slide 12
  • Wireless microphones A mic with a built in transmitter Allows performer total freedom of movement since there is no audio cable connected to the audio mixer Problem: Can be subject to interference from other microphones in the room or can have interference from signals in the air
  • Slide 13
  • Tips for proper microphone techniques: When testing a mic, never tap or blow into it. Test by reading actual lines from your script. Check for the proper distance between your mouth and the mic and then keep it at that spot. Try not to rattle your script pages Never whisper a cue, the mic picks up everything Always assume your mic is on, be respectful of others in the room Always remove batteries from the mics when not in use, unless there is an on/off switch. If there is a switch, you can turn the mic off to conserve battery power.
  • Slide 14
  • Audio connectors:
  • Slide 15
  • Follow up questions: If a microphone has a pick up pattern from only one direction, what is that pattern called?
  • Slide 16
  • Pattern: Uni-directional Or ( one direction)
  • Slide 17
  • Pick up patterns If a microphone has a pick up pattern that picks up sound from many directions, what is that pattern called?
  • Slide 18
  • Answer: omni directional
  • Slide 19
  • Types of microphones: If I am doing an interview in a studio situation and I have a host and a guest, I would most likely use what type of mic?
  • Slide 20
  • Answer: The best type of microphone would be a Lavalier ( clip on ) microphone. One for me and one for my guest.
  • Slide 21
  • Microphone types: If I wanted to go around the school and do a man on the street type of video, the best microphone to use would be:
  • Slide 22
  • Types of microphones: A hand held microphone or it is sometimes called a stick mic.