atlas of veterinary hematology

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    SAUNDERS

    mprint lsevier

    The CurtisCenter

    Independence SquareWest

    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19106

    Library Congress Cataloglng-lnPublication Data

    Harvey JohnW.

    Atlasof veterinary hematology: bloodandbonemarrowof domestic animals John

    W.Harvey

    p.

    em.

    Includes

    bibliographical

    references

    p.).

    ISBN-13:978-0-7216-6334-0 ISBN-10:0-7216-6334-6

    1.

    Veterinary

    hematology-Atlases. 2. Bloodcells-Atlases. 3. Bonemarrow-Atlases.

    I. TItle

    SF769.5.H37 2001

    636.089 615--dc21

    ATLAS

    OF

    VETERINARY

    HEMATOLOGY

    00-063569

    Copyright 2001 by W.O.

    Saunden

    Company

    All rights reserved. No part ofthis publicationmaybe reproducedor transmittedin any formor by any

    means,electronicor mechanical,includingphotocopy, recording,or any informationstorageand retrieval

    system,withoutpermissionin writingfrom the publisher.

    Permissionsmay be soughtdirectly from Elsevier s Health SciencesRightsDepartmentin Philadelphia,

    PA,USA:phone: +1) 215 239 3804, fax:

    +1)

    215 239 3805, e-mail: healthpermissions@elsevier.com.

    Youmay also completeyour requeston-line via the Elsevierhomepage http://www.elsevier.com).by

    selecting Customer Support and then Obtaining Permissions .

    ISBN 3: 978 7216 6334 0

    ISBN-I0: 0-7216-6334-6

    Printedin China

    Last digit is the print number: 9 8 7 6 5 4

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    z

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    ref ce

    This color atlas is designed as a reference book for the morphologic aspects of

    veterinary hematology of common domestic animals excluding birds pecies

    covered include dogs cats horses cattle sheep goats pigs and llamas The

    atlas is divided into two sections blood and bone marrow It includes basic

    material for the novice as well as material of primary interest to those with

    advanced training Techniques for the collection and preparation of blood and

    bone marrow smears and bone marrow core biopsies are discussed in addition

    to the morphology of the tissues collected Often more than one example of a

    cell type or abnormal condition is shown because cells and conditions can vary

    in morphology Veterinary technologists will likely find the blood section and

    the techniques part of the bone marrow section to be most helpful Veterinary

    students and practicing veterinarians should benefit from the complete book

    even if they are not directly involved in bone marrow evaluation because

    provides a basis for understanding diseases affecting the marrow The bone

    marrow aspirate smear cytology and core biopsy histology section will be most

    useful to clinical pathologists anatomic pathologists and residents in training

    for these disciplines This is not a complete hematology textbook but rather a

    reference book in which the text explains the significance of the morphologic

    abnormalities shown in the color photographs eaders interested in learning

    more about a

    given

    topic will hopefully appreciate the extensive bibliography

    provided

    ohn

    arvey

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    knowledgments

    I want to acknowledge those most responsible for my education as a clinical

    pathologist. Few people have the opportunity to

    re eive

    training from the giants

    of their profession but I was blessed in being trained by Jerry Kaneko the

    father of veterinary clinical biochemistry and Oscar Schalm the father of

    veterinary hematology. Many other colleagues have contributed to my develop-

    ment as a hematologist with Victor Perman and Alan Rebar being particularly

    noteworthy as we have challenged one another with unknown hematology

    slides in front of various audiences. I thank Denny Meyer for his encourage-

    ment in taking on the task of preparing this atlas and Rose Raskin Leo

    McSherry and Shashi Ramaiah for their conscientious

    reviews

    and helpful

    suggestions. I appreciate Melanie Pate s careful editorial review and am grateful

    to Ray

    ersey

    at W.B. Saunders Co. for his remarkable patience and persistent

    support in this endeavor.

    ohn arvey

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    ditor s

    ot

    The purpose of this text/atlas is to provide veterinarians veterinary students

    veterinary technicians and veterinary technology students with a complete treatise

    on the cytology of blood and bone marrow

    The subjects will be covered in a user friendly way utilizing color photo-

    graphs and appropriate text that clarifies diagnostic implications Therapy will be

    discussed only when diagnosis can be confirmed by response to treatment

    Ninety percent of the information will focus on commonly recognized diseases

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    H PTER

    Examination

    lood Samples

    S MPLE OLLE TION

    ND

    H NDLING

    n

    overnight fast avoids postprandial lipemia in monogastric animals, which

    can interfere with plasma protein, fibrinogen, and hemoglobin determinations.

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid EDTA is the preferred anticoagulant for com

    plete blood count CBC determination in most species, but blood from some

    birds and reptiles hemolyzes when collected into EDTA.

    In those species,

    heparin is often used as the anticoagulant. The disadvantage of heparin is that

    leukocytes do not stain as well (presumably because heparin binds to leuko

    cytes ,? and platelets generally clump more than they do in blood collectedwith

    EDTA. However, as will be discussed later, platelet aggregates and leukocyte

    aggregates may occur even in properly collected EDTA-anticoagulated blood

    samples. : In those

    cases,

    collection of blood using another anticoagulant (e.g.,

    citrate) may prevent the formation of cell aggregates. Cell aggregation tends to

    be more pronounced as blood is cooled and stored; consequently, processing

    samples as rapidly as possible after collection may minimize the formation of

    leukocyte and/or platelet aggregates.

    Collection of blood directly into a vacuum tube is preferred to collection

    of blood by syringe and transfer to a vacuum tube. This method reduces

    platelet clumping and clot formation in samples for CBC determinations. Even

    small clots render a sample unusable. Platelet counts are markedly reduced, and

    significant reduction can sometimes occur in hematocrit (HCT) and leukocyte

    counts as well. Also, when the tube is allowed to fill based on the vacuum

    within the tube, the proper sample to anticoagulant ratio

    will

    be present.

    Inadequate sample size results in decreased HCT due to

    excessive

    EDTA solu

    tion. Care should be taken to avoid iatrogenic hemolysis, which interferes with

    plasma protein, fibrinogen, and various erythrocyte measurements. Samples

    should be submitted to the laboratory as rapidly as is feasible, and blood films

    should be made as soon as possible and rapidly dried to minimize morphologic

    changes.

    3

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    4

    SECTION I

    BLOOD

    IGUR Gross appearance mixtures oxyhemoglobin deoxyhemoglobin and methemo-

    globin and differentiation

    erythrocyte agglutination from rouleau formation

    A Venous

    blood sample from a cat with 28 methemoglobin left sample) compared to a normal cat with less than

    1 methemoglobin right sample). Both samples also contain a mixture of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemo-

    globin. B Oxygenated blood sample from a cat with 28 methemoglobin left sample)

    Continued

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    CHAPTER 1 / EXAMINATION OF

    BLOOD SAMPLES

    GROSS X MIN TION

    5

    Samples are checked for dots and mixed well (gently inverted 20 times) imme

    diately before removing aliquots for hematology procedures. Horse erythrocytes

    settle especially rapidly because of rouleau formation (adhesion of erythrocytes

    together like a stack of coins). Blood should be examined grossly for color and

    evidence of erythrocyte agglutination. The presence of marked lipemia may

    result in a blood sample with a milky red color resembling tomato soup

    when oxygenated.

    Methemoglobinemia

    Hemoglobin is a protein consisting of four polypeptide globin chains, each of

    which contains a heme prosthetic group within a hydrophobic pocket. Heme is

    composed of a tetrapyrrole with a central iron molecule that must be main

    tained in the ferrous

    +2

    state to reversibly bind oxygen. Methemoglobin

    differs from hemoglobin only in that the iron molecule of the heme group has

    been oxidized to the ferric +3

    state and it is no longer able to bind

    oxygen.

    The presence of large amounts of deoxyhemoglobin accounts for the dark,

    bluish color of normal venous blood samples. Methemoglobinemia may not be

    recognized in venous blood samples, because the brownish color of methemo

    globin is not readily apparent when mixed with deoxyhemoglobin Fig.

    lA).

    When deoxyhemoglobin binds oxygen to form oxyhemoglobin, it becomes

    bright red; consequently, the brownish coloration of

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