Architecture. St. Basil’s Cathedral For my first creative building influence, I choose the bright colors of St. Basil’s Cathedral, a well-known cathedral

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Architecture </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> St. Basils Cathedral For my first creative building influence, I choose the bright colors of St. Basils Cathedral, a well-known cathedral in Eastern Russia. The architects were Postnik Yakovlev and Barma. It was built beginning in 1555 and ending in 1561. It also has a unique Renaissance style. The history of the building is generally unknown other than that the cathedral was built for Ivan the Terrible to celebrate the capture of Kazan. Also, from what I gathered, the bulding is made of wood, stone, gold, and terracotta. Other interesting facts: Napoleon tried to blow it up but failed, and after the building was complete, Ivan the Terrible wanted to blind the architects so they could never again create something so beautiful. Link to an Interesting Website http://www.moscow.info/red-square/st- basils-cathedral.aspx </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Petit Hameau, Moulin Blah For a second influence, I found out about the Mill at Le Hameau de la Reine, or the Hamlet of the Queen created by Richard Mique. Originally, it was created as a retreat for Marie Antoinette. So although many of the buildings are rustic on the outside, a majority are lavish and extravagant on the inside. However, I choose a simple building, the Mill, or Moulin. Contrary to its name, it never acted as any type of mill. The Hamlet was built from 1783-1788 in a rustic style for the French royalty, specifically the Queen, in France at Versailles. It is mostly wood, brick, a thatched roof, iron, glass, stone, and plaster. </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Crystal Palace From looking at the picture at the left, one might ask why I do not have a recent picture of the Crystal Palace. It is not because of Creative Commons, but because it burned down 1936. Completed in 1851 for The Great Exhibition to take place in London that year. The architect was Joseph Paxton and he used a highly industrial style. He mainly used cast-iron and glass in his design. This building used an amazing 293,000 panes of glass. Also, an interesting fact, Paxton submitted this design last minute for a challenge to all architects in the area, to see whose design could host the Great Exhibition of 1851. Interesting Site: http://www.victorianstation.com/palace.html </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Bibliography Information: Crystal Palace/The Great Exhibition of 1851. Victorian Station. 1999-2001. 13 Feb. 2012.. Saint Basils Cathedral. Morley, Parker, and Frank Rister. 2000-2012. 13 Feb. 2012.. Aaltonen, Gayner. The History of Architecture. New York: Metro Books, 2008. Cattermole, Paul, ed. Architectural Excellence. Ontario: Firefly Books, 2008. Pictures: FotoCommunity. 2011. 10 Feb. 2012. Fotopedia. Fotonauts inc. 2008-2012. 10 Feb 2012. Resumbre.com. Pape, Dave. 10 Feb 2012. *All Pictures were searched for using Creative Commons so they are legal to use </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> My Faade! </li> </ul>