anchor comprehension strategies - amazon s3 · pdf file skills & strategies math to build...

Click here to load reader

Post on 16-Aug-2020

0 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • B e n c h m a r k e d u c a t i o n c o m p a n y

    Themes • Architecture Reflects Culture • Spatial Relationships • Geometry of Design

    Geography

    Skills & Strategies

    Math to Build On Level R/40

    Anchor Comprehension Strategies

    • Make inferences

    Comprehension • Think about it

    • Use text features to locate information

    Word Study/Vocabulary • Use knowledge of word structures to

    determine word meaning

    Geography Big Idea • Physical and human geographic features

    define places and regions of the world.

    TeACher’S Guide

  • Model metacognitive strategy: think about it

    Model comprehension strategy: make inferences

    Use knowledge of word structures to determine word meaning: base words

    Apply metacognitive strategy: think about it

    Guide comprehension strategy: make inferences

    Use knowledge of word structures to determine word meaning: base words

    Apply metacognitive strategy: think about it

    Apply comprehension strategy: make inferences

    Use text features to locate information: captions

    Compare and contrast information

    D a y

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    A c t i v i t i e s

    A dd i t i o n a l R e l a t e d R e s o u r c e s

    Notable Trade Books for Read-Aloud • Haslam, Andrew. Building

    (Make it Work! Science). Two-Can Publishing, 2000.

    • Isaacson, Philip. Round Buildings, Square Buildings, and Buildings That Wiggle Like Fish. Knopf, 2001.

    • Putnam, James. Eyewitness: Pyramid. DK Publishing, 2000.

    Web Site for Content Information • PBS—Building Big Series

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/ buildingbig/

    Students can explore the fundamentals of building through bridges, domes, skyscrapers, dams, and tunnels.

    S a m p l e L e s s o n P l a n n i n g G u i d e

    Copyright © 2011 Benchmark Education Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Teachers may photocopy the reproducible pages for classroom use. No other part of the guide may be reproduced or transmitted in whole or in part in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage or retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

    ISBN: 978-1-4108-1115-82

    Lesson at a Glance Before Reading (page 3) • Build Background Knowledge • Introduce the Book • Administer Preassessment

    During Reading (pages 4–10) Introduction and Chapters 1–2 (pages 4–6) • Model Metacognitive Strategy:

    Think About It • Set a Purpose for Reading • Discuss the Reading • Model Comprehension Strategy:

    Make Inferences • Use Knowledge of Word Structures

    to Determine Word Meaning: Base Words

    Chapters 3–4 (pages 7–8) • Apply Metacognitive Strategy:

    Think About It • Set a Purpose for Reading • Discuss the Reading • Guide Comprehension Strategy:

    Make Inferences • Use Knowledge of Word Structures

    to Determine Word Meaning: Base Words

    Chapters 5–6 and Conclusion (pages 9–10) • Apply Metacognitive Strategy:

    Think About It • Set a Purpose for Reading • Discuss the Reading • Apply Comprehension Strategy:

    Make Inferences • Use Text Features to Locate

    Information: Captions

    After Reading (page 11) • Administer Posttest • Synthesize Information:

    Compare and Contrast

    Writing Workshop (pages 12–13) • Model the Writing Process:

    Make Inferences

    Making Inferences (page 14)

    Word Structures: Base Words (page 15)

    Inferences (page 16)

    Build background knowledge: visualize and draw buildings

    Introduce/preview the book: back cover, table of contents, chapters

    Navigators Lesson Guides provide flexible options to meet a variety of instructional needs. Here is one way to structure this lesson.

  • Before Reading Build Background Knowledge • Say: Close your eyes and picture the neatest building you’ve ever

    seen. The building may be one you have really seen or a picture of one from a book. Now open your eyes and draw what you saw. Share drawings with group members. Ask students why they chose that building.

    • Ask: What kind of building do you live in? What materials is it made from? Encourage students to talk about where they live and what they know about the construction of their homes.

    • Ask: Do you like to picture things in your mind? Do you like to figure out problems? Explain that people who design buildings have good visualization skills. They are also very good at math.

    • Draw a T-chart as shown. Write the heading on the left side of the chart first. Have students give some examples of different kinds of buildings. Next write the heading on the right side of the chart. Have students talk about what these buildings have in common. (Possible answers: They were all designed by someone. They were built for people to use. They were made of similar materials, and built to last.)

    • Have students look at both sides of the T-chart. Encourage students to share their thoughts. Ask: What other kinds of buildings are there? (Possible answers: hospitals, stadiums, theaters)

    Introduce the Book • Give students a copy of the book. Read the back cover blurb.

    Ask: What do you think this book is about? What do you think math has to do with buildings?

    • Have students turn to the table of contents. Ask: How is this book organized? What is each chapter about?

    • Select two chapters to view as a group. Have students look at the pictures and diagrams. Have them discuss the buildings’ shapes and guess what they are used for.

    • Explain that the buildings and other structures in this book were built and still stand because their builders had special skills.

    Administer Preassessment • Have students take Ongoing Assessment #23 on page 82 in the

    Comprehension Strategy Assessment Handbook (Grade 4).

    • Score assessments and use the results to determine instruction.

    • Keep group assessments in a small-group reading folder. For in-depth analysis, discuss responses with individual students.

    What different kinds of buildings

    are there?

    Some buildings are places where

    people live. Some are places

    where people learn, like schools and

    museums. Some are office

    buildings, like skyscrapers.

    Some are places where people

    gather, like churches.

    What do these buildings all have

    in common?

    They are all designed by

    someone. They are all built

    for people to use. They are made of similar materials. They are built to

    last.

    Informal Assessment Tips

    1. Assess students’ ability to locate chapters using the table of contents.

    2. Document informal observations in a folder or notebook.

    3. Keep the folder or notebook at the small-group reading table for handy reference.

    4. For students who need more help, tell them that the name of each chapter in the table of contents is next to the page number where the chapter begins.

    5. Point out that each chapter is about one kind of building or structure.

    © 2011 Benchmark Education Company, LLC 3

  • During Reading: Introduction and Chapters 1–2 Model Metacognitive Strategy: Think About It

    • Use a real-life example of thinking about what you read. Say: Careful readers think about what they read. They ask themselves questions. This helps them stay interested and understand more of what they read. Some readers think about the big ideas or the details. Others wonder about why things happen the way they do. As I read a book, I stop at the end of every page and ask myself, “What did I just read?” I write my thoughts on self- stick notes or in my journal. If I can’t remember what I read, I know I need to reread the page more carefully. Yesterday, we previewed the book Math to Build On. Today we are going to think about what we read in chapters 1 and 2.

    • Read pages 4–5 aloud while students follow along. Stop at the end of each page. At the end of page 4, ask: What did I just read? Well, this page tells me that pyramids are found all over the world, and it describes exactly what a pyramid is. I’ll write that on a self-stick note and place it on page 4. At the end of page 5, ask: What did I just read? This page tells me about pyra- mids in Central and South America and the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco. I’ll write that on a self-stick note and place it on page 5.

    • Say: These two pages give me a lot to think about. I used to think that the Egyptians were the only people who built pyramids, but many people have built them. Even some modern skyscrapers are built in the shape of a pyramid! I wonder why all these people around the world built this kind of building? Why did they choose a triangle shape with four sides? I will write these thoughts on self-stick notes and put them on page 5. These thoughts sum up pages 4–5.

    • Say: I’m really glad I stopped to think about what I was reading. Now I have lots of ideas and questions about this kind of building.

    4 © 2011 Benchmark Education Company, LLC

    Good readers think about what they are reading. Thinking

    about what is read helps read