Adapted from materials developed by Anita P. Barbee, MSSW, Ph.D.

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California Child Welfare Core Practice Model: Theoretical Framework, Values, and Principles For Audio Call 1-866-740-1260 Access Code 6439067. Adapted from materials developed by Anita P. Barbee, MSSW, Ph.D. Goals of the Presentation. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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California Child Welfare Core Practice Model:Theoretical Framework, Values, and PrinciplesFor AudioCall 1-866-740-1260Access Code 6439067Adapted from materials developed byAnita P. Barbee, MSSW, Ph.D.*Goals of the PresentationTo review the theories, values, and principles, and practice elements identified by the Practice Model Element Refinement SubcommitteeTo gather feedback prior to the March convening *Summer Convening 2013We Learned:Be clear on the theories, values, and principles you want to guide practiceMake sure those theories, values, and principles are fully fleshed out across casework practice, the entire organization, and the systemUnderstand the complexity of implementing a Practice Model and the role that fidelity checking can have in installing and maintaining desired practiceBe clear on the goals for your Practice Model and what you want to accomplish before you begin the rollout *What Is a Practice Model?A practice model for casework management in child welfare should be theoretically and values based, as well as capable of being fully integrated into and supported by a child welfare system. The model should clearly articulate and operationalize specific casework skills and practices that child welfare workers must perform through all stages and aspects of child welfare casework in order to optimize the safety, permanency and well being of children who enter, move through and exit the child welfare system. Child Welfare Casework Practice Model Definition (Barbee, Christensen, Antle, Wandersman & Cahn, 2011) *Keys to Practice Model SuccessA theoretical underpinning related to orientation towards clients and origins of problems they faceA theory of change focused on how to best assess and intervene to build on strengths and reduce problemsA fully articulated set of actions and skills that can be observed for presence and strengthWandersman (2009) *More Keys to Practice Model SuccessSystem supportsEvaluation results, including data benchmarks to monitor the efficacy of the model *Wandersman (2009) Practice Models Help Us Understand PracticePractice models delineate how to think about or conceptualize the practice with the population of focus:The conceptualization of the problem (e.g., child maltreatment is embedded in the stage of a familys life development)The change theory that informs how that problem can be remediated (e.g., self efficacy theory)The theory that guides the critical contribution and influence of the relationship alliance or partnership (e.g., solution focused theory)The core practice values that underlie the approach to clients and the problem (e.g. family centered or strengths based). *Linking with Existing PracticeOur goal is to develop a practice model that builds on the great work already taking place by integrating key elements of existing initiatives and proven practices including CAPP and Katie A. Specifically, the model development included:A review of the Theoretical Frameworks of the Katie A. Shared Core Practice Model and the California Partners for Permanency (CAPP) Core Practice Model as well as other key practices employed in counties in California.Alignment of the key and common elements of those practices and practice models.*Developing the modelHeres a reminder of our process:Summer 2013 ConveningCreation of a design committee as well as other sub-committees focused on practice model development, communications, and outreach and engagementConsultation with expertsEstablishing a theoretical frameworkRefining the feedback from the summer convening through the lens of our theoretical frameworkLets take a look at these refined elements, starting with the theories*What is a Theory?A theory or framework is an organized set of explanatory principles that are susceptible to hypothesis testing. Good theory leads to research to test the theory or debunk the theory and an evidence base to support the theory.Bad theory has either been disproven or is ideologically driven.*Why do we need theories?Our work involves preventing future abuse and neglect. In order to do this, we must try to understand:What leads to the problem of child maltreatment?What predictable processes are involved in child maltreatment?How can our practice prevent the problem or process from starting or intervene once the problem has arisen?*Problem, Process, Practice, PreventionTheories must help staff understand:What causes the problem (child maltreatment), including the types of internal vs. external causal attributions staff will make about the causes of child maltreatmentWhat process is going on that is impacting the person and making the situation or problem worse, including past and ongoing oppression and trauma How to engage in optimal practice including the proper orientation to take towards clients and the way to successfully intervene and provide effective treatmentHow to create efficient and compassionate systems that effectively sustain ongoing treatment and prevent future problems. *Identifying Our TheoriesOctober-December 2013Dr. Barbee reviewed relevant micro level and practice theories and presented them to the Practice Model Element Refinement SubcommitteeThe subcommittee reviewed the theories and identified the theories that best reflect practice in CaliforniaDr. Barbee presented the identified theories to the Practice Model Design Team and to a statewide audience via webinar*Four Subgroups of TheoriesThree types of micro theories:Orienting Theories- These help set the orientation towards clients and work with clients in the child welfare system. Any child welfare casework practice model must choose at least one theory from this cluster to set the tone for all interactions with clients. Neuro-Developmental Theories- These focus on the developmental nature of children and families. These approaches help us understand how and why maltreatment happens and how and why interventions work. Intervention Theories- These help set an understanding of the process leading to maltreatment and specify what needs to change in order for maltreatment to end and safety to be ensured. Plus a category for organization theories:Organizational Theories- These help us understand how our system will support and sustain the practice model**Orienting Theories - These help set the orientation towards clients and work with clients in the child welfare system. Any child welfare casework practice model must choose at least one theory from this cluster to set the tone for all interactions with clients. *Neuro-Developmental Theories - These focus on the developmental nature of children and families. These approaches help us understand how and why maltreatment happens and how and why interventions work. *Intervention Theories - These help set an understanding of the process leading to maltreatment and specify what needs to change in order for maltreatment to end and safety to be ensured. *Organizational Theories - These help us understand how our system will support and sustain the practice model*Source: Quinn et al. (2003), p.13. Downloaded from http://blog.soton.ac.uk/comp6044/2012/11/26/management-models/*Organizational Theories - These help us understand how our system will support and sustain the practice model*Organizational Theories - These help us understand how our system will support and sustain the practice model*Organizational Theories - These help us understand how our system will support and sustain the practice modelValues and PrinciplesThe Practice Model Element Refinement Subcommittee also developed a set of values and principles for the modelThese were approved by the subcommittee and presented to the Design Team The values and principles are Based on the work completed at the summer conveningLinked to the identified theories*Values and Principles*Values and principles work together to reflect the theoretical framework and form the path from theory to practice. Values are an expression of an ideal or optimal state of being. Principles provide a more detailed operationalization of the value and give an idea of what the value would look like in practice*Children and youth are safe, have a loving permanent family, and are supported to achieve their full developmental potential.We provide the supports necessary to keep children and youth safe from abuse and neglect. We build permanency for all children and youth so that every child and youth has a lifelong, loving, permanent, legal family. We work to help families function at their best and to assist children and youth to achieve their full developmental potential. *We work in partnership with families, youth, foster parents, communities, tribes, and service providers.We value the familys experiences and perceptions and build partnerships based on mutual respect and trust.We work with families to facilitate their role as decision makers and safety planners for their children. We partner with communities and tribes to promote the use of services that are community / tribe-based and employ formal and informal support systems. *Children and youth maintain attachments with family members, friends, community, culture, and tribe.We work to keep families together and support ongoing relationships with siblings, extended family members and mentors. Placement in out-of-home care happens only when all other options to ensure safety have been exhausted.We work with families, communities and tribes to place children and youth with people they know and in their home community or tribe.*We are transparent and open in our work with children, youth, families, tribes, communities and service providers.We value mutual honesty, transparency, and accountability in our work with children, youth, families, tribes, communities, and service providers. We listen, communicate, and honestly share issues, concerns, and progress in our interactions and this is reflected in all reports. *Our system and interactions are grounded in cultural humility.We engage in ongoing efforts to ensure our interactions indicate our cultural humility, our respect for the familys culture, our interest in learning from the family about their culture, and our work to identify and address institutional and personal bias. *We believe in the potential for change in families and in ourselves.We believe that families can grow and change to promote their own safety and well-being. We engage in continuous quality improvement in an environment of learning and development in our agencies and among our workforce. We listen and learn from children, families, partners, and each other and work together to support self-reflection, critical thinking, individual and organizational development, humility, and improvement. *Effective services and supports are available to meet family needs.We work with families and communities to identify, advocate for, link, and support use of evidence-based, trauma-informed, individualized, needs-driven, strengths-based services and supports. We consider research evidence; professional expertise; and family and community / tribe values, preferences, and circumstances as we work with families to make service plans. Timely, culturally relevant, family-driven services are accessible and available.*We have a healthy, competent, and professional workforce. We work to support the health, safety, and professional development of staff. We believe in quality recruitment, staff development, training, and support.Linking Theories, Values, and Principles*More Information AvailableRecorded WebinarsResource DocumentsPowerPoint Presentationshttp://calswec.berkeley.edu/california-child-welfare-core-practice-model*Questions?Answers!Next StepsCWDA Regional Meeting PresentationsGoals of the Meetings:Provide feedback on theoretical framework, values, principles and other components of the practice modelCWDA Childrens Committee Practice Model Workshop March 6 and 7, 2014 in Long BeachGoals of the Convening:Achieve agreement on theoretical framework, values, principles and other components of the practice modelAchieve agreement on the level of standardization for the practice behaviorsDevelop a plan for internal and external engagement of staff and stakeholders****Refresh from webinar*As discussed in the CALSWEC Webinar in JuneThe first two points delineate how to think about or conceptualize the practice with the population of focus. The theoretical foundation can respond to four areas: The conceptualization of the problem (e.g., child maltreatment is embedded in the stage of a familys life development)The change theory that informs how that problem can be remediated (e.g., self efficacy theory)The theory that guides the critical contribution and influence of the relationship alliance or partnership (e.g., solution focused theory)The core practice values that underlie the approach to clients and the problem (e.g. family centered or strengths based). A casework practice model should specify the practice skills that are to be carried out and measured for fidelity and implementation adherence. These include: Core practice skills that guide practice across the life of a case (e.g., engagement, assessment, planning, decision making) so that even when there is no direction about a specific type of encounter, the theory and meta-skills together can guide practiceClearly specified and distinct practice skills for each stage of a child welfare case including intake, investigation, in-home services, placement into and monitoring of progress in out of home care (reunification, foster care recruitment and certification, adoption)This is where incorporating techniques particular to different stages of the case can be useful as long as they align with the values and theoretical orientation of the overarching PMSpecific skills for dealing with distinct family issues as child sexual abuse, neglect, or domestic violence involvement.*As discussed in the CALSWEC Webinar in JuneThe model must include development of organizational and system supports that facilitate social workers being able to enact the identified practices, and it must include data points to monitor fidelity to the model and, once fidelity is achieved, to evaluate the impact on outcomes, in this case for children and families in the child welfare system. Process or Implementation Evaluation assessing fidelity to the model is essential before embarking on outcome evaluationBenchmarks important in child welfare would include the federal Child and Family Services Review outcomes of safety, permanency and well-being as well as other intervening or process measures that may be relevant (e.g. employee retention, engagement of community partners, and so on). ******Therefore, The integrative theoretical framework of California, or any county or state, needs to be evidence based and trauma informed and pull from theories that address Problem, Process, Practice and Prevention (Evidence Based P Quad or EBPQ).*Recall that a micro theory focuses on the thoughts, feelings and behaviors of individuals and families and practice theories focus on the interaction between child welfare staff and clients. A child welfare practice model is mostly focused at that level of work and analysis. Later we created a chart to cover relevant macro level theories that guide the work of the organization- the context where the work takes place. Certainly some theories, even micro ones, acknowledge larger macro influences- such as conflict theory- and how those affect daily work with clients. **Distribute the theories handout*********Distribute Values and Principles Handout*********Distribute Practice Model Elements Handout**Distribute the draft agenda and refer people to the CWDA intranet for more info*

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