[ACS Symposium Series] Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Composites Volume 585 || Novel Organic—Inorganic Composite Materials for Photonics

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<ul><li><p>Chapter 25 </p><p>Novel OrganicInorganic Composite Materials for Photonics </p><p>Paras N . Prasad, Frank V. Bright, Upvan Narang, Run Wang, Richard A. Dunbar, Jeffrey D. Jordan, and Raz Gvishi </p><p>Photonics Research Laboratory and Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, N Y 14214 </p><p>A polymeric composite structure offers one the opportunity to systematically optimize individual properties independently in order to produce useful materials for photonics. This contribution summarizes a portion of our work on the local microenvironment and photonic properties in a new class of inorganic:organic hybrid composites prepared by sol-gel processing. The ability to form sol--gel processed hybrid materials into films, monoliths, and fibers and to control the microstructure for producing optically transparent bulk materials with desired porosity make sol-gel-derived materials suitable for development of chemical biosensors. However, in order to achieve this final goal one must understand how the evolving sol--gel matrix affects the "chemical recognition element" entrapped within the sol-gel network. Toward this end, we have used steady--state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to determine how the microenvironment around a dopant (organic fluorophore) entrapped within a sol-gel matrix evolves with time. We have successfully used this new information to develop new chemical sensing platforms (i.e., thin films) based on artificial recognition element, enzymes, and intact antibodies. The sol-gel matrix clearly provides a convenient avenue to entrap organic dopants. This in turn provides an attractive vehicle for fabricating nonlinear optical glasses. With this goal in mind, we have prepared a series of inorganic glass:polymer composites for third-order nonlinear optical applications. The nonlinear optical response has been investigated using femtosecond degenerate four-wave mixing, optical Kerr gating, and transient absorption. Stable electric field-induced alignment has been achieved for second-order nonlinear optical effects such as second harmonic generation and electro-optic modulation. </p><p>Sol-gel processing lends itself to conveniently prepare novel inorganic:organic composite materials (1-4). This approach involves the hydrolysis of a metal </p><p>0097-6156/95/0585-0317$12.00/0 1995 American Chemical Society </p><p>Dow</p><p>nloa</p><p>ded </p><p>by U</p><p>NIV</p><p> OF </p><p>CA</p><p>LIF</p><p>OR</p><p>NIA</p><p> SA</p><p>N F</p><p>RA</p><p>NC</p><p>ISC</p><p>O o</p><p>n D</p><p>ecem</p><p>ber </p><p>9, 2</p><p>014 </p><p>| http</p><p>://pu</p><p>bs.a</p><p>cs.o</p><p>rg </p><p> Pub</p><p>licat</p><p>ion </p><p>Dat</p><p>e: M</p><p>arch</p><p> 21,</p><p> 199</p><p>5 | d</p><p>oi: 1</p><p>0.10</p><p>21/b</p><p>k-19</p><p>95-0</p><p>585.</p><p>ch02</p><p>5</p><p>In Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Composites; Mark, J., et al.; ACS Symposium Series; American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, 1995. </p></li><li><p>318 HYBRID ORGANIC-INORGANIC COMPOSITES </p><p>alkoxide, followed by a cascade of condensation and polycondensation reactions (1-4). During this process, one starts with a solution phase which is transformed first into a gel and finally into a solid glass upon removal of the solvents. The low temperature conditions associated with the sol-gel process allow one to encapsulate organic species within a sol-gel-derived inorganic matrix without decomposing the organic moiety. Sol-gel-processed materials have been used in areas ranging from the development of novel solid-state dye lasers to chemical biosensors (1-14). These sol-gel-processed materials have also been used to fabricate non-linear optically active composites (5) for applications in optical telecommunications. </p><p>Sol-gel-derived inorganic:organic hybrid materials have been prepared by various procedures. As examples, one can mix the sol-gels with the organic materials while the sol is in the solution phase, impregnate or dope the organic species into the pores of a sol-gel-processed composite material, hydrolyze a precursor material with an organic moiety covalently bonded to it (ORMOSIL) , or mix an ormosil with an unmodified sol-gel solution. </p><p>In a majority of the sol-gel-derived inorganic:organic composites, the chemical recognition, activity, or overall composite function arises from the organic dopant. Thus, it becomes very important to understand how the local microenvironment around the dopant, within a sol-gel-derived material, is affected by the growing/evolving sol-gel network. Toward this end, we have e n c a p s u l a t e d r h o d a m i n e 6 G ( R 6 G ) and 6 - p r o p i o n y l - 2 -(dimethylamino)naphthalene (PRODAN) within tetramethyorthosiliane (TMOS)-derived sol-gel glasses (15-17). R 6 G and P R O D A N are fluorescent molecules with unique properties. R 6 G is an isotropic rotor and its emission spectrum is essentially insensitive to its local environment (16). As a result, we can use static and time-resolved anisotropy techniques to study the rotational freedom/mobility of this dopant within a sol-gel matrix. The excited-state decay kinetics and emission profile of P R O D A N are highly dependent on the local microenvironment. Thus, P R O D A N reports on the local sol-gel microenvironment around the probe. In addition, P R O D A N has very good nonlinear optical properties. </p><p>Sol-gel-processed materials have emerged as platforms for chemical biosensors. To date, there have been several encouraging reports on the encapsulation of organics, artificial receptors, enzymes, and antibodies within sol-gel-derived materials (9-14). For example, our group reported the first successful encapsulation of an artificial chemical recognition element within a sol-gel matrix (7). Soon after that work we also demonstrated the first antigen-antibody function within a sol-gel matrix (12). </p><p>Photonics represents a multidisciplinary frontier of science and technology that has captured the interest of scientist and engineers around the world. Much of the current interest arises because of the applicability of photonics to current and future information and image processing technologies. Photonics is analogous to electronics in that it describes the technology in which photons (not electrons) are used to acquire, store, transmit, and process information. Nonlinear optical processes are critical to the ultimate processing of photonics information. Typical examples of key nonlinear optical phenomena include the </p><p>Dow</p><p>nloa</p><p>ded </p><p>by U</p><p>NIV</p><p> OF </p><p>CA</p><p>LIF</p><p>OR</p><p>NIA</p><p> SA</p><p>N F</p><p>RA</p><p>NC</p><p>ISC</p><p>O o</p><p>n D</p><p>ecem</p><p>ber </p><p>9, 2</p><p>014 </p><p>| http</p><p>://pu</p><p>bs.a</p><p>cs.o</p><p>rg </p><p> Pub</p><p>licat</p><p>ion </p><p>Dat</p><p>e: M</p><p>arch</p><p> 21,</p><p> 199</p><p>5 | d</p><p>oi: 1</p><p>0.10</p><p>21/b</p><p>k-19</p><p>95-0</p><p>585.</p><p>ch02</p><p>5</p><p>In Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Composites; Mark, J., et al.; ACS Symposium Series; American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, 1995. </p></li><li><p>25. PRASAD ET AL. OrganicInorganic Composite Materials for Photonics 319 </p><p>ability to alter the frequency (or color) of light and to amplify one source of light with another (5,18-21). </p><p>At the molecular level, the nonlinear optical response can be described in terms of the dipole induced by the applied electric field which can be expanded by the following power series (19): </p><p>( - 0 ) - a</p></li><li><p>320 HYBRID ORGANIC-INORGANIC COMPOSITES </p><p>throughout the sol-gel aging cycle and the other varied with aging time. The rotational correlation time data was transformed into microviscosity data (Figure 1), and these results were interpreted in terms of a two-microdomain model. One of the domains exhibits a low viscosity and remains "constant" throughout the sol-gel aging cycle. The second domain, in contrast, is "variable"; it is low in viscosity initially but substantially more viscous as the sol-gel ages. The relative ratio of the "constant" to "variable" domain decreases significantly as the sol-gel ages. These results demonstrate the heterogeneity of the sol-gel matrix, the complexity of the microencapsulation process, and show that there is a subpopulation of dopants that are mobile within the sol-gel network. </p><p>The excited-state decay kinetics of P R O D A N is strongly dependent on the physicochemical properties of its local environment (i.e., the cybotactic region). Thus, P R O D A N doped within a sol-gel can provide information on the evolution of the network throughout the sol-gel aging cycle (17). The P R O D A N fluorescence over the aging cycle indicated that solvent expulsion from the sol-gel matrix is a step-wise process, in which the removal of ethanol is followed by water. The excited-state intensity decay profiles of P R O D A N in sol-gels is best described by a unimodal Gaussian distribution throughout aging cycle. This result suggests that P R O D A N experiences an ensemble of microenvironments. </p><p>Figure 2 depicts the change in average P R O D A N lifetime (within a sol-gel matrix) as a function of aging time and processing p H (8, and 4, v). The average P R O D A N lifetime is 2.6 ns during the first week of the sol-gel aging cycle. This is intermediate to the lifetime of P R O D A N in water (2.1 ns) and ethanol (3.6 ns). Upon further aging, the average lifetime drops to 2.1 ns suggesting a water-like environment. The average lifetime of P R O D A N increases and levels off at 2.6 - 2.7 ns on further aging of the sol-gels. These results indicate that cybotactic region within a sol-gel is heterogeneous immediately after gelation and throughout the entire aging cycle and that expulsion of a more volatile solvent, ethanol, is followed by the expulsion of water. </p><p>Biosensors </p><p>The selectivity of antibodies has been widely used for the development of antibody-based biosensors (22-30). In these schemes, an immobilized antibody or fragment thereof serves to recognize selectively the target analyte and the binding process leads to an optical, mass, or electrochemical response related to the concentration of analyte in the sample (22-30). </p><p>There are many steps associated with the actual development of any real-world antibody-based biosensor (22-30). As examples, one must select an appropriate target analyte-antibody pair, develop a detection scheme, and "immobilize" the antibody (28) such that it retains its affinity and is stable over time. The decision on a particular antigen-antibody pair is straight forward and the choice of detection method depends on issues like required dynamic range and needed detection limits. The issue of protein immobilization is not, however, so straight forward, yet it represents one of the keys to any biosensor development (22-28). </p><p>Dow</p><p>nloa</p><p>ded </p><p>by U</p><p>NIV</p><p> OF </p><p>CA</p><p>LIF</p><p>OR</p><p>NIA</p><p> SA</p><p>N F</p><p>RA</p><p>NC</p><p>ISC</p><p>O o</p><p>n D</p><p>ecem</p><p>ber </p><p>9, 2</p><p>014 </p><p>| http</p><p>://pu</p><p>bs.a</p><p>cs.o</p><p>rg </p><p> Pub</p><p>licat</p><p>ion </p><p>Dat</p><p>e: M</p><p>arch</p><p> 21,</p><p> 199</p><p>5 | d</p><p>oi: 1</p><p>0.10</p><p>21/b</p><p>k-19</p><p>95-0</p><p>585.</p><p>ch02</p><p>5</p><p>In Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Composites; Mark, J., et al.; ACS Symposium Series; American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, 1995. </p></li><li><p>25. PRASAD ET AL. OrganicInorganic Composite Materials for Photonics 321 </p><p>1000 </p><p>100 </p><p>5 </p><p>10 + </p><p>0.1 </p><p> 1^ y 2 </p><p>w v </p><p> \ </p><p>i l 1 </p><p>10u 101 102 10J 10&lt; </p><p>A g n g Time (min) </p><p>Figure 1. Effects of aging time on the recovered microviscosities associated with the two discrete R 6 G rotational motions in TMOS-derived sol-gel. ??1 and 2 corresponded to R 6 G in the "constant" and higher viscosity, "variable" sol-gel microdomains, respectively. The chemical structure of R 6 G is also shown. </p><p>Dow</p><p>nloa</p><p>ded </p><p>by U</p><p>NIV</p><p> OF </p><p>CA</p><p>LIF</p><p>OR</p><p>NIA</p><p> SA</p><p>N F</p><p>RA</p><p>NC</p><p>ISC</p><p>O o</p><p>n D</p><p>ecem</p><p>ber </p><p>9, 2</p><p>014 </p><p>| http</p><p>://pu</p><p>bs.a</p><p>cs.o</p><p>rg </p><p> Pub</p><p>licat</p><p>ion </p><p>Dat</p><p>e: M</p><p>arch</p><p> 21,</p><p> 199</p><p>5 | d</p><p>oi: 1</p><p>0.10</p><p>21/b</p><p>k-19</p><p>95-0</p><p>585.</p><p>ch02</p><p>5</p><p>In Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Composites; Mark, J., et al.; ACS Symposium Series; American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, 1995. </p></li><li><p>322 HYBRID ORGANIC-INORGANIC COMPOSITES </p><p>3.5 </p><p>o . o - ) . . . 1 1 1 </p><p>10 2 10 3 10 4 </p><p>Aging Time (min) </p><p>Figure 2. Effects of aging time and p H [8 ( ) ; 4 (v)] on the recovered mean excited-state lifetime (&lt; &gt;) and the width (W) of P R O D A N in a T M O S -derived sol-gel. The error bars represent the uncertainty at the rigorous 67% confidence interval. The chemical structure of P R O D A N is also shown. </p><p>Dow</p><p>nloa</p><p>ded </p><p>by U</p><p>NIV</p><p> OF </p><p>CA</p><p>LIF</p><p>OR</p><p>NIA</p><p> SA</p><p>N F</p><p>RA</p><p>NC</p><p>ISC</p><p>O o</p><p>n D</p><p>ecem</p><p>ber </p><p>9, 2</p><p>014 </p><p>| http</p><p>://pu</p><p>bs.a</p><p>cs.o</p><p>rg </p><p> Pub</p><p>licat</p><p>ion </p><p>Dat</p><p>e: M</p><p>arch</p><p> 21,</p><p> 199</p><p>5 | d</p><p>oi: 1</p><p>0.10</p><p>21/b</p><p>k-19</p><p>95-0</p><p>585.</p><p>ch02</p><p>5</p><p>In Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Composites; Mark, J., et al.; ACS Symposium Series; American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, 1995. </p></li><li><p>25. PRASAD ET AL. OrganicInorganic Composite Materials for Photonics 323 </p><p>The most common methods of immobilization involve non-covalent (entrapment and adsorption) or covalent attachment schemes (29). Unfortunately, although many of these methods work reasonably well, they can be non-trivial, the immobilized antibodies are often unstable or loose a significant portion of their affinity with time (29,30), and the final biosurface is prone to fouling in a real biological milieu. Thus, biosensor development is very much limited by the lack of a simple, generic immobilization protocol. As a result, a simple (ideally one-step) method to immobilize and stabilize active antibodies such that they can be located at sensor or transducer interfaces would offer many advantages. </p><p>Recently, ambient condition sol-gel methods have yielded a new way to immobilize (i.e., encapsulate) proteins within porous, optically transparent glasses (94). Because of the mild conditions associated with the sol-gel glass processing, encapsulated biomolecules have been shown to retain a degree of function/activity (94). This approach is unique compared to the conventional methods involving adsorption on glass surfaces, entrapment in polymer matrices, or impregnation of porous glass powders because encapsulation is based on actually growing of siloxane polymer chains around the biomolecule within an inorganic oxide network. </p><p>We recently demonstrated for the first time that an antibody (antifluorescein) could be entrapped within a sol-gel-derived glass matrix (12). In this particular series of experiments the hapten (fluorescein) served simultaneously as the fluorescent probe. When fluorescein is free in solution it exhibits a strong emission at about 520 nm. When bound to antifluorescein its fluorescence is quenched by a factor of _ 10 and there is a distinct shift in the emission spectrum. Thus, we were able to use changes in the fluorescence spectrum, intensity, and excited-state decay kinetics to probe the antifluorescein -fluorescein binding process within the sol-gel matrix (Figure 3). Our results demonstrated that: (1) we could indeed entrap an antibody within a sol-gel glass matrix; (2) analyte could diffuse into the porous sol-gel network; (3) the entrapped antibody retained its inherent function (i.e., it selectively bound its hapten); and (4) the antibody retained a remarkable fraction of its affinity (Kf = 10 1 0 M " 1 native; Kf = 107 Ml in sol-gel). </p><p>Nonlinear Optics </p><p>The ultimate realization of advanced photonics technologies rests on the development of multifunctional materials which are capable of simultaneously satisfy many requirements. In order to implement nonlinear optical materials to perform photonics functions (e.g., optical frequency conversion, light control by electric field or by another light beam) and...</p></li></ul>

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