Academic Readiness for College : What Does it Mean?

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Academic Readiness for College : What Does it Mean?. Lynne Miller. January ,2006. What We Know About Maine Kids and College. 80% of Maine eighth graders say they want to go to college 75-85% of students who begin high school graduate - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Academic Readiness for College : What Does it Mean?Lynne MillerJanuary ,2006

  • What We Know About Maine Kids and College 80% of Maine eighth graders say they want to go to college75-85% of students who begin high school graduateLess than 50% of students who matriculate at Maines public universities graduate within six years Of all Maine graduating seniors in 200565-70% of those enrolled in public schools ( including the 11 town academies) took the SAT 51-53% attended a two or four year college in the fallabout 30% will earn a bachelors degree

  • Shared Goals: Pre-K to 16 #1: Maine students who aspire to college will have access to a curriculum that adequately prepares them for college level work. #2: More Maine students who enter our public universities will progress toward a degree in a timely fashion

  • What Has to HappenSchools have to prepare students who aspire to go to college for success in college Colleges have to provide the conditions for student success in college.High school and college faculty have to talk to each other

  • ACT Study ResultsSource: (2005) ACT, Inc.

    .ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt]Chart3

    51

    41

    26

    Courses

    % Students

    College Readiness by Subject

    .ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt]Sheet1

    156

    234

    3 or >18

    .ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt]Sheet1

    0

    0

    0

    # Remedial Courses

    % Students

    6 Year Graduation Rates

    .ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt]Sheet2

    ReadingAlgebraBiology

    514126

    .ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt]Sheet2

    0

    0

    0

    Courses

    % Students

    ACT Study Results

    .ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt].ppt]Sheet3

  • MEA Data 2005

    .ppt]Chart2

    46

    33

    20

    12

    MEA Assessment 2003

    % Students Meet or Exceed

    MEA Meet/Exceed Percents

    44

    .ppt]Sheet1

    156

    234

    3 or >18

    .ppt]Sheet1

    0

    0

    0

    # Remedial Courses

    % Students

    6 Year Graduation Rates

    .ppt]Sheet2

    BiologyAlgebraEnglish Comp

    264056

    .ppt]Sheet2

    0

    0

    0

    Courses

    % Students

    ACT Study Results

    .ppt]Sheet3

    Reading44

    Writing35

    Math22

    Science10

    .ppt]Sheet3

    MEA Assessment

    % Students Meet or Exceed

    MEA Data 2005

  • Graduation Rates: Maine Public Universities

    Education Trust 2005

  • 6 Year Graduation Rates: Maine Private Colleges Bowdoin90.1%Bates88.5 %Colby86.4%College of the Atlantic82.3 %Maine Maritime 69.5%St Josephs61.9%UNE56.6%Husson53.7%Thomas52.1%Unity46.7%MeCA36.1%

  • 6 Year Graduation Rates: New England Public UniversitiesUNH72.6% UVM69.9%UConn69.8%UMass64.0%URI56.0%Keene State51.2%Plymouth State42.7%

  • High School to College DisconnectsHigh school diploma college admission College admission placement in degree earning courses

  • High School Graduation College Admission

  • College Admission College Readiness High school graduates are

    accepted to college as full time students BUT are unprepared for college work

    pay tuition to enroll in developmental courses BUT do not earn credit toward graduation

  • Remedial CoursesEvery year

    50% of entering full time students are placed in remedial courses in U.S. universities and college

    Remedial courses have a negative impact on retention and on graduation

    50% of entering full time students are placed in remedial courses in U.S. universities and college Remedial courses have a negative impact on retention and on graduation

    Every Year

  • Post-Secondary EducationSource: Kirst, M. (2004). The high school/college disconnect. Educational Leadership, 62(3), 51-55.

    Chart1

    56

    34

    18

    # Remedial Courses

    % Students

    6 Year Graduation Rates

    Sheet1

    056

    134

    3 or >18

    Sheet1

    0

    2

    3 or >

    # Remedial Courses

    % Students

    6 Year Graduation Rates

    Sheet2

    BiologyAlgebraEnglish Comp

    264056

    Sheet2

    0

    0

    0

    Courses

    % Students

    ACT Study Results

    Sheet3

  • Remedial Course Enrollmentsin Maines Public Universities

    Over 700 students are enrolled in remedial or developmental writing courses each fallOver 1500 are enrolled in remedial or developmental math courses each fall

  • First Gatekeeper for Placement: The SATUMF catalog statement:UMF does not require standardized testsas part of the admission process. However, students who wish to submit test scores may do so. The SAT I is used for placement purposes. Students who do not provide SAT scores and students with scores below a cutoff point will be required to take mathematics and writing placement tests before enrolling in UMF mathematics or writing courses.

  • Second Gatekeeper: The Placement TestThe Accuplacer is is a self-paced, un-timed computerized placement test that is used by UMA, UMFK, UMM, and UMPI and all seven community college campuses. The College Board publishes The Accuplacer Online Student GuideStudents can practice taking the test at this site: http://www.testpreview.com/accuplacer_practice.htm

  • Second GatekeeperUSM , UMF, and UMaine use tests that are developed on the individual campusUSM sample tests are published on-line athttp://www.usm.maine.edu/testing/testing/pdfs/samplemath.pdf (MATH)http://www.usm.maine.edu/testing/testing/pdfs/sampleenglish.pdf ( WRITING)

  • Overview of Developmental Writing Courses at UMaine CampusesFall, 2004 L. Miller

  • Developmental Courses in Math at UMaine CampusesFall, 2004 L. Miller

  • New SAT RequirementsMath: requires mastery of math through Algebra 2;Critical Reading: requires critical reading of long and short textsWriting: requires ability to answer multiple choice grammar and style questions and to compose a writing sample

  • NEW SAT MATH EXPECTATIONSNumber and Operation

    Arithmetic word problems (including percent, ratio, and proportion) Properties of integers (even, odd, prime numbers, divisibility, etc.)Rational numbers Logical reasoningSets (union, intersection, elements)Counting techniquesSequences and series (including exponential growth)Elementary number theory

    Algebra and Functions

    Substitution and simplifying algebraic expressionsProperties of exponentsAlgebraic word problemsSolutions of linear equations and inequalitiesSystems of equations and inequalitiesQuadratic equationsRational and radical equationsEquations of linesAbsolute valueDirect and inverse variationConcepts of algebraic functionsNewly defined symbols based on commonly used operations

  • NEW SAT MATH EXPECTATIONSGeometry and Measurement

    Area and perimeter of a polygonArea and circumference of a circleVolume of a box, cube, and cylinderPythagorean Theorem and special properties of isosceles, equilateral, and right trianglesProperties of parallel and perpendicular linesCoordinate geometryGeometric visualizationSlopeSimilarityTransformationsData Analysis, Statistics, and Probability

    Data interpretationStatistics (mean, median, and mode)Probability

  • H. S. Math CurriculaStudies a class of functionsdefinition, graphs, properties, and mathematical models.Topics covered include:LinearQuadraticExponentialLogarithmicRational algebraicIrrational algebraicHigher degree functionsConic sectionsSequencesProbability Statistics Extends and reviews concepts learned in Algebra 1 Introduces more advanced subjectsLogarithmsCoordinate geometryProbability

    HonorsCollege Prep

  • New SAT WritingA sense of happiness and fulfillment, not personal gain, is the best motivation and reward for ones achievement. Expecting a reward of wealth or recognition for achieving a goal can lead to disappointment and frustration. If we want to be happy in what we do in life, we should not seek achievement for the sake of winning wealth and fame. The personal satisfaction of a job well done is its own reward.

    Assignment: Are people motivated to achieve by personal satisfaction rather than by money or fame? In 25 minutes, plan and write an essay in which you develop your point of view on this issue. Support your position with reasoning and examples taken from your reading, studies, experience, or observation

  • 11th Grade MEA Writing PromptWhat if there were eight days in a week? Write about how you would use the additional day

  • H.S. English CurriculaDevelop skills in reading, public speaking and writing Chronological and critical understanding of American literatureChallenging reading load (10 or more novels plus short stories and poetry)Express understanding in clear, organized manner through class discussion and written assignments, expository and analytic writing Write a research paper, with hypothesis, supporting evidence, and conclusion Required summer reading listDevelop skills in grammar, vocabulary, oral presentations and speechesSurveys American literature Studies works from college preparatory anthology and selected novels Composition focuses on narrative and descriptive essays and introduces expository writingResearch paper requiredHonorsCollege Prep

  • COLLEGE READINESSin WritingChancellors Committee Report on College Readiness in Writing Presented to the Board of Trustees of the University of Maine System(June 2005)

  • Report to the Field

    Prepared by over Sixty Writing Instructors from Maines Public Universities and Community Colleges

  • Courses in College Writing EmphasizeCorrect standard written EnglishFinding and correcting errorsCreating complex thesesDistinguishing analysis from summary

  • Courses EmphasizeBlooms Taxonomy higher critical thinking skillsAnalysisSynthesisEvaluationImmediately grappling with complex ideasReading academic articles across the disciplines as well as literature

  • High School vs. College Experience

    I am not asking how you feel about this issue; Im asking what you think about this issue.

    University focus = Abstraction ArgumentAnalysisDiscussionWriting about Texts

  • High School vs. College Writing ExperienceThe expository essay is informational in high school, explication of a text in collegeTerms like persuade, evaluate, analyze are used differently College writing is expository or analytical (seldom narrative) and moves beyond personal experience

  • College Writing: Sample AssignmentNear the end of her essay, Tompkins writes, What this means for the problem Ive been addressing is that I piece together the story of European Indian relations as best I can, believing this version up to a point , that version not at all, another: almost entirely, according to what seems reasonable and plausible given everything I know. And this is, as I have shown, what I was already doing in the back of my mind without realizing it, because there was nothing else I could doPlease write a four page essay in which you consider Tompkinss conclusion. Do you agree with her? How do you evaluate evidence that Tompkins presents to support her position? Finally, it is important that you make clear somewhere in your essay what you think Tompkinss conclusion is

  • Preparing for College Writing

    Before writing about a text, students should

    Understand the expectations for reading the text and writing about itLearn explicitly how to read the text Walk through the text with a teacher Point out the features of a textKnow how to get the most out of a text

  • Preparing for College Writing

    Evaluating arguments found in reading according to logical rulesDeveloping arguments in writing Using evidence to support argumentsUsing ideas from reading in new contextsCreating coherence between parts of an essayRevising sentences for logic and completeness

  • Preparing for College WritingUsing subordination, coordination, and parallelism comfortablyReading analytical texts that make arguments Using academic vocabularyParticipating in discussions and in peer review of drafts

  • COLLEGE READINESSin MathChancellors Committee Report on College Readiness in Math Presented to the Board of Trustees of the University of Maine System(January,2006)

    .

  • Mathematics is the language of science

  • System Wide Standards for General Education MathDeveloped by seven math faculty from UMS campuses and representatives from, Maine Math and Science Alliance and MaineDesigned to clarify and communicate math concepts and skills necessary to place out of developmental courses and to succeed in general education science and social science courses

  • General Education Math CoursesDesigned for students who do not plan to major in those technical or scientific fields that require mathematics beyond a general education level.

    Note: A complementary listing of math competencies for students entering technical or math/science fields is being developed

  • System Wide Standards for General Education Math

    Mathematical ReasoningComputationAlgebraGeometryData AnalysisStatistics

  • Preparing Students for College Level MathStudents who are prepared for general education math are able to perform mathematical operations and manipulations by hand or with a calculator when appropriateunderstand basic concepts and definitionsapply, interpret and communicate results.

  • Preparing Students for College Level MathA senior year math course for all college bound students: not necessarily pre-calc or calcDecreased reliance on calculatorsA firm foundation in algebraic and quantitative reasoningA math curriculum ( middle through high school) that progresses to college ready skills and competencies

  • Preparing Students for College MathBroaden the math teaching repertoire to include new instructional strategies Add to the tried and true practices that work for some but not for allExplore Agile Mind and other innovative math teaching approachesDont be fenced in by what the experts say; innovate

  • Preparing Students for College Math

    Change organizational and teaching arrangements when necessaryUse a supplemental instruction modelUse accelerated learning strategies to help students catch up and fill in gaps

  • For those students who enter high school with aspirations for college, what should we tell them they need to be college ready?

  • Statement of the UMaine System Chief Academic OfficersWhile the seven campuses of the University of Maine System have different criteria for admission and placement, they all share a common understanding of what comprises an optimal, college-ready high school transcript. Students who succeed in college and graduate on time usually have the following high school preparation

  • English Four years of English courses that incorporate a variety of texts (fiction, non-fiction, essays, memoirs, journalism) and that emphasize expository and analytic writing skills..

  • Math Four years of math courses that include at least algebra I and II, geometry, and a 12th-grade college-preparatory math course that provides a solid foundation in quantitative and algebraic reasoning. For those students planning to major in mathematics, science, or a technical or professional field that requires advanced math skills, a pre-calculus or calculus course is strongly recommended

  • History and Social Sciences At least three years of history and social science in courses that emphasize the reading of primary and secondary texts, the writing of analytic and expository essays, and the use of quantitative data and research findings.

  • Science At least three years of laboratory scienceoffered as either separate courses or as integrated core classesthat includes the study of biology, chemistry, and physics. Science courses should emphasize the writing of technical reports, quantitative representations, and analyses of data in addition to traditional content.

  • Language other than English At least two years of study in a language other than English.

  • Promoting High School to College ConversationsOctober: Conversations about Writing Conference in AugustaOngoing: Calderwood Conversations about Writing , 8 sessions across MaineNovember: Conversations about Math in Bangor and Portland MLR reviewNGA Grant

  • Web sitesCollege Readiness Reportswww.usm.maine.edu/smp/resourceswww.maine.edu/writersPlacement Testswww.usm.maine.edu/testing/testing/pdfs/samplemath.pdf www.usm.maine.edu/testing/testing/pdfs/sampleenglish.pdfwww.testpreview.com/accuplacer_practice.htm

    What happens over the summer? Its not an aspirations problem. They are taking the SAT and getting accepted.

    Why do only 30% graduate?Of ACT test takers, this shows the percentage who achieve a score that is correlated with college readiness. They do this by correlating earlier students ACT scores with grades they actually received as college freshmen.the benchmarks indicate the skill level as which a student has a 70% likelihood of earning a C or better and a 50 % chance of earning a B or better.(NYT 8/17/05) This is done every year and it doesnt change.

    See ACT articleHere you can see the comparison of how Maine11th grade students are doing on our MEA assessment.Issue is that you pay tuition but do not earn credit toward graduation.

    People dont know this. Most of you probably didnt have to do this but this is what is happening for your studentsMore than 700 students in writing

    No consistency among the campuses. Its one of the things the U. system is working on

    Every campus admits students and then uses the SAT cut-off scores.

    So if they say the SAT doesnt count, its not really accurate where placement is concerned.Same for math -- 1500 students enrolled in remedial

    Some campuses have a series of 2 to 3 remedial courses Its possible for students to take 3 remedial math and 1 writingSome campuses also have remedial reading and remedial science courses.

    Think about what that does to persistence and potential to grad.Youve spent a semester at school, paid tuition and have no credits to show for it.3 separate tests3 hours and 45 minutes of test time to do test5 hours including breaksPerfect score is now 2400 not 1600Use to be math through algebra 1 not algebra 2Writing test has 2 parts25 minute essay and then mc test on grammer - similar to the old SAT 2 This was taken from a typical Maine hs course of studies

    Which one is going to prepare students better for the SAT?Sat writing requirements include an essay addressing a prompt.A sample from the new SAT in writingWhich will prepare?

    College prep - anthology not novelsDoesnt emphasize analytica and expository writingNo summer reading* Group of 60 instructors of writing from the University of Maine System and the Maine Community College SystemWhen they ask students to analyze something they often get a summary. They need to learn to go beyond summarizing.

    They are expected to be able to do a rudimentary analysis.Work on 3 higher levels and immediately throw them into complex assignments

    Ex. Read an article on philosophy of science and apply it to an article on anthropological method. Use one text to refer to another text.1st assignmentExpository essays in hs have you explain somethingIn college it means to unpack a text and anaylyze itExplain how to tie a tie vs. explain the meaning of a text.Persuade means using well developed arguments and evidence rather than appealing to emotionEvaluate does not mean how you feel about the text, it means reaching a conclusion about the worthiness of an argumentAnalyze does not mean summarizeAnother gatekeeper is a sample prompt for an english 100 class

    This would happen day 1 of a writing courseDevelopmental students could also take this prompt to get out of the developmental course.

    These instructors are teaching reading strategies. How to read a college text.An example - before writing ,each student became an expert on a paragraph and presented it to the class

    Personalizing - expectations constant method variesComing in this is what 1st year students should be able to do.

    If you focus on this by senior year across the curriculum students will be ready.* Group of 60 instructors of writing from the University of Maine System and the Maine Community College System

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