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  • GEORGIA TECHS C H O O L O F C I T Y & R E G I O N A L P L A N N I N G

    6 0 T H A N N I V E R SA RY E X H I B I T, 19 5 2 2 012

  • GEORGIA TECHS C H O O L O F C I T Y & R E G I O N A L P L A N N I N G

    6 0 T H A N N I V E R SA RY E X H I B I T, 19 5 2 2 012

  • GEORGIA TECHS C H O O L O F C I T Y & R E G I O N A L P L A N N I N G

    6 0 T H A N N I V E R SA RY E X H I B I T, 19 5 2 2 012

  • School hosts 27th ACSP conferenceDavid Sawicki becomes 4th

    Program Director

    Leon Eplan becomes 3rd Program Director

    Frederick K. Bell Scholarship instituted

    Catherine Ross becomes Programs 1st African-American faculty member

    Arthur Campbell becomes 1st Africa-American MCP graduate

    Program recognized by National Education Committee

    Joint degree established in Urban Design

    Malcolm Little becomes 2nd Program Director

    Joint Degree established in Transportation Planning (with Civil Engineering)

    Thera Richter becomes 1st female graduate and 1st woman to earn a graduate degree at Georgia Tech

    Student Planning Society is founded

    City Planning Program welcomes 1st class

    Howard Menhinick becomes 1st ProgramDirector

    1988198319811979197019691968

    1965

    1962

    1959

    1954

    1952

    1951

    Stan Fitterman wins Edward McClure Award

    Shi Hak Noh becomes 1st PhD graduate

    Steve French becomes 5th Program Director

    Program moves to new offices in Architecture- East buidling

    Hahira Studio wins APA National Student Project Award

    Center for Geographic Information Systems founded and Steve French becomes 1st Center Center Director

    Cheryl Contant becomes 6th Program Director

    Carol Barrett and Lester Solin inducted into inaugural class of AICP Fellows

    The City Planning Program becomes The City and Regional Planning program

    50th Anniversary Celebration

    Catherine Ross becomes Director of the newly founded Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development (2003)(2003)

    Bruce Stiftel becomes 7th Program Director

    CRP Program becomes the School of City & Regional Planning & Bruce Stiftel becomes founding School Chair

    Troels Adrian wins Edward McClure Award

    Subhro Guhathakurta becomes 2nd Director of the Center for GIS

    Fort MacPherson Studio wins National APA Student Project Award

    MS-GIST degree program approved

    1989 1992 1995 1996 1999 2002

    2008

    2010

    2011

    2012

    2013

  • School hosts 27th ACSP conferenceDavid Sawicki becomes 4th

    Program Director

    Leon Eplan becomes 3rd Program Director

    Frederick K. Bell Scholarship instituted

    Catherine Ross becomes Programs 1st African-American faculty member

    Arthur Campbell becomes 1st Africa-American MCP graduate

    Program recognized by National Education Committee

    Joint degree established in Urban Design

    Malcolm Little becomes 2nd Program Director

    Joint Degree established in Transportation Planning (with Civil Engineering)

    Thera Richter becomes 1st female graduate and 1st woman to earn a graduate degree at Georgia Tech

    Student Planning Society is founded

    City Planning Program welcomes 1st class

    Howard Menhinick becomes 1st ProgramDirector

    1988198319811979197019691968

    1965

    1962

    1959

    1954

    1952

    1951

    Stan Fitterman wins Edward McClure Award

    Shi Hak Noh becomes 1st PhD graduate

    Steve French becomes 5th Program Director

    Program moves to new offices in Architecture- East buidling

    Hahira Studio wins APA National Student Project Award

    Center for Geographic Information Systems founded and Steve French becomes 1st Center Center Director

    Cheryl Contant becomes 6th Program Director

    Carol Barrett and Lester Solin inducted into inaugural class of AICP Fellows

    The City Planning Program becomes The City and Regional Planning program

    50th Anniversary Celebration

    Catherine Ross becomes Director of the newly founded Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development (2003)(2003)

    Bruce Stiftel becomes 7th Program Director

    CRP Program becomes the School of City & Regional Planning & Bruce Stiftel becomes founding School Chair

    Troels Adrian wins Edward McClure Award

    Subhro Guhathakurta becomes 2nd Director of the Center for GIS

    Fort MacPherson Studio wins National APA Student Project Award

    MS-GIST degree program approved

    1989 1992 1995 1996 1999 2002

    2008

    2010

    2011

    2012

    2013

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • CHAIRS MESSAGE CHAIRS MESSAGE

  • CHAIRS MESSAGE CHAIRS MESSAGE

  • BOOK INTRODUCTION BOOK INTRODUCTION

  • BOOK INTRODUCTION BOOK INTRODUCTION

  • SECTION DIVIDER SECTION DIVIDER

  • SECTION DIVIDER SECTION DIVIDER

  • urban centers, and political boundaries.

    Rules of thumb for establishing boundaries of Rules of thumb for establishing boundaries of regional planning organizations offered guidance on several practical concerns, including environment evaluation, avoidance of crossing state lines, utilization of county boundaries in building a regional planning area, consideration of political boundaries, and optimum size in terms of jurisdiction and physical area. of jurisdiction and physical area.

    The report also offers sample resolutions for creating an official regional or area-wide planning commission.

    This Regional Boundaries report was completed when there were only two Regional Planning agencies in Georgia. It reflects the Georgia Department of Commerces Planning Division taking the first steps to develop additional regional planning entities in the state. By the 1970s, all Georgia counties were included in Regional PlanningPlanning Areas.

    The report analyzes factors that influenced the eventual regional delineation of the state, including natural and cultural environments. Cultural environments were divided up into four subcategories: transportation, communication,

    Georgia

    additional info

    1962

    additional info

    First steps to develop regional planning entities across the state

    DETERMINING GEORGIA REGIONAL BOUNDARIES

    THOMAS FICHTClass of 1963

    14

  • urban centers, and political boundaries.

    Rules of thumb for establishing boundaries of Rules of thumb for establishing boundaries of regional planning organizations offered guidance on several practical concerns, including environment evaluation, avoidance of crossing state lines, utilization of county boundaries in building a regional planning area, consideration of political boundaries, and optimum size in terms of jurisdiction and physical area. of jurisdiction and physical area.

    The report also offers sample resolutions for creating an official regional or area-wide planning commission.

    This Regional Boundaries report was completed when there were only two Regional Planning agencies in Georgia. It reflects the Georgia Department of Commerces Planning Division taking the first steps to develop additional regional planning entities in the state. By the 1970s, all Georgia counties were included in Regional PlanningPlanning Areas.

    The report analyzes factors that influenced the eventual regional delineation of the state, including natural and cultural environments. Cultural environments were divided up into four subcategories: transportation, communication,

    Georgia

    additional info

    1962

    additional info

    First steps to develop regional planning entities across the state

    DETERMINING GEORGIA REGIONAL BOUNDARIES

    THOMAS FICHTClass of 1963

  • Compatibility Planning. In support of this Circular, the FAA commissioned Robert Doyle and the Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and Co. Airport Consulting Practice in San Mateo, California, to prepare the April, 1978 report entitled Planning 1978 report entitled Planning for the Airport and Its Environs: The Sea-Tac Success Story. Over 10,000 copies of this document were distributed to cities, counties and airport authorities throughout the United States. United States.

    That same year, the King County and Port of Seattle Planning Departments received a Meritorious Program Award from the American Institute of Planners for this project. In 1986, Robert Doyle received the Jay Hollingsworth Speas the Jay Hollingsworth Speas Airport Award for his innovative approaches for enhancing airport and community compatibility.

    The Sea-Tac Communities Plan was completed in 1976 as the chief end product of an innovative, multi-year planning study cosponsored by the Port of Seattle and King County, Washington. Funded in part by a grant from the Federal a grant from the Federal Aviation Administration, the $642,000 study focused on the development of a coordinated master plan for Sea-Tac International Airport and its environs, a 44 square mile area adjoining Puget Sound area adjoining Puget Sound between the cities of Seattle and Tacoma.

    The plan was the first federally funded project in which improvements on a large hub airport were fully integrated with plans and programs for the communities directly affected by the airport. The FAFAA used the landmark plan as a model in its Advisory Circular, Airport Land Use 1976

    Port of Seattle and King County,

    Washington

    First federally-funded project to integrate airport improvements and programs for affected communities

    SEA-TAC COMMUNITIES PLAN

    ROBERT DOYLEClass of 1959

    16

  • Compatibility Planning. In support of this Circular, the FAA co