5-1. 5-2 PREVIEW OF CHAPTER Intermediate Accounting IFRS 2nd Edition Kieso, Weygandt, and Warfield 5.

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  • Slide 1
  • 5-1
  • Slide 2
  • 5-2 PREVIEW OF CHAPTER Intermediate Accounting IFRS 2nd Edition Kieso, Weygandt, and Warfield 5
  • Slide 3
  • 5-3 Explain the uses and limitations of a statement of financial position. Identify the major classifications of the statement of financial position. Prepare a classified statement of financial position using the report and account formats. Indicate the purpose of the statement of cash flows. Identify the content of the statement of cash flows. 6.Prepare a basic statement of cash flows. 7.Understand the usefulness of the statement of cash flows. 8.Determine additional information requiring note disclosure. 9.Describe the major disclosure techniques for financial statements. After studying this chapter, you should be able to: Statement of Financial Position and Statement of Cash Flows 5 LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Slide 4
  • 5-4 Statement of financial position, also referred to as the balance sheet: 1.Reports assets, liabilities, and equity at a specific date. 2.Provides information about resources, obligations to creditors, and equity in net resources. 3.Helps in predicting amounts, timing, and uncertainty of future cash flows. STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION LO 1
  • Slide 5
  • 5-5 Computing rates of return. Evaluating the capital structure. Assess risk and future cash flows. Assess the companys: Liquidity, Solvency, and Financial flexibility. Usefulness STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION LO 1
  • Slide 6
  • 5-6 Most assets and liabilities are reported at historical cost. Use of judgments and estimates. Many items of financial value are omitted. Limitations STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION LO 1
  • Slide 7
  • 5-7 Explain the uses and limitations of a statement of financial position. Identify the major classifications of the statement of financial position. Prepare a classified statement of financial position using the report and account formats. Indicate the purpose of the statement of cash flows. Identify the content of the statement of cash flows. 6.Prepare a basic statement of cash flows. 7.Understand the usefulness of the statement of cash flows. 8.Determine additional information requiring note disclosure. 9.Describe the major disclosure techniques for financial statements. After studying this chapter, you should be able to: Statement of Financial Position and Statement of Cash Flows 5 LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Slide 8
  • 5-8 LIABILITYEQUITY Elements of the Statement of Financial Position Resource controlled by the entity. Result of past events. Future economic benefits are expected to flow to the entity. ASSET CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT LO 2
  • Slide 9
  • 5-9 EQUITY Elements of the Statement of Financial Position Present obligation of the entity. Arising from past events. Settlement is expected to result in an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits. ASSET CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT LIABILITY LO 2
  • Slide 10
  • 5-10 LIABILITY Elements of the Statement of Financial Position Residual interest in the assets of the entity after deducting all its liabilities. ASSET CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT EQUITY LO 2
  • Slide 11
  • 5-11 Subclassifications A recent survey shows that companies are moving toward reporting current assets first on the statement of financial position, which is a change from a few years ago. CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT ILLUSTRATION 5-1 Statement of Financial Position Classification LO 2
  • Slide 12
  • 5-12 Generally consists of: Long-term Investments Property, Plant, and Equipment Intangibles Assets Other Assets Non-Current Assets CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT LO 2
  • Slide 13
  • 5-13 Long-term Investments 1.Securities (bonds, ordinary shares, or long-term notes). 2.Tangible assets not currently used in operations (land held for speculation). 3.Special funds (sinking fund, pension fund, or plant expansion fund). 4.Non-consolidated subsidiaries or associated companies. CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT LO 2
  • Slide 14
  • 5-14 Investments in Debt and Equity Securities Portfolio Type Classification Held-for- Collection DebtAmortized Cost Current or Non-current Trading Debt or EquityFair ValueCurrent Non-Trading Equity Equity Fair Value Current or Non-current CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT Valuation LO 2
  • Slide 15
  • 5-15 Long-Term Investments ILLUSTRATION 5-17 Classified Report-Form Statement of Financial Position CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT LO 2
  • Slide 16
  • 5-16 Tangible long-lived assets used in the regular operations of the business. Physical property such as land, buildings, machinery, furniture, tools, and wasting resources (minerals). With the exception of land, a company either depreciates (e.g., buildings) or depletes (e.g., oil reserves) these assets. Property, Plant, and Equipment CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT LO 2
  • Slide 17
  • 5-17 CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT Property, Plant, and Equipment ILLUSTRATION 5-17 Classified Report-Form Statement of Financial Position LO 2
  • Slide 18
  • 5-18 Lack physical substance and are not financial instruments. Patents, copyrights, franchises, goodwill, trademarks, trade names, and customer lists. Amortize limited-life intangible assets over their useful lives. Periodically assess indefinite-life intangibles for impairment. Intangible Assets CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT LO 2
  • Slide 19
  • 5-19 Intangible Assets ILLUSTRATION 5-17 Classified Report-Form Statement of Financial Position LO 2
  • Slide 20
  • 5-20 Items vary in practice. Can include: Long-term prepaid expenses Non-current receivables Assets in special funds Property held for sale Restricted cash or securities Other Assets CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT LO 2
  • Slide 21
  • 5-21 Cash and other assets a company expects to convert into cash, sell, or consume either in one year or in the operating cycle, whichever is longer. Current Assets CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT ILLUSTRATION 5-5 Current Assets and Basis of Valuation LO 2
  • Slide 22
  • 5-22 Disclose: Basis of valuation (e.g., lower-of-cost-or-net realizable value). Cost flow assumption (e.g., FIFO or average cost). CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT Inventories LO 2
  • Slide 23
  • 5-23 Inventories ILLUSTRATION 5-17 Classified Report-Form Statement of Financial Position LO 2
  • Slide 24
  • 5-24 Major categories of receivables should be shown in the balance sheet or the related notes. A company should clearly identify Anticipated loss due to uncollectibles. Amount and nature of any non-trade receivables. Receivables used as collateral. Receivables CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT LO 2
  • Slide 25
  • 5-25 Receivables LO 2 ILLUSTRATION 5-17 Classified Report-Form Statement of Financial Position
  • Slide 26
  • 5-26 Payment of cash, that is recorded as an asset because service or benefit will be received in the future. Insurance Supplies Advertising Cash Payment Expense Recorded BEFORE Rent Taxes Prepayments often occur in regard to: Prepaid Expenses CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT LO 2
  • Slide 27
  • 5-27 Prepaid Expenses ILLUSTRATION 5-17 Classified Report-Form Statement of Financial Position LO 2
  • Slide 28
  • 5-28 Short-Term Investments CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT Portfolio Type Classification Held-for- Collection DebtAmortized Cost Current or Non-current Trading Debt or EquityFair ValueCurrent Non-Trading Equity Equity Fair Value Current or Non-current Valuation LO 2
  • Slide 29
  • 5-29 Short-Term Investments ILLUSTRATION 5-17 Classified Report-Form Statement of Financial Position LO 2
  • Slide 30
  • 5-30 Generally any monies available on demand. Cash equivalents - short-term highly liquid investments that mature within three months or less. Restrictions or commitments must be disclosed. Cash CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT LO 2
  • Slide 31
  • 5-31 Cash ILLUSTRATION 5-17 Classified Report-Form Statement of Financial Position LO 2
  • Slide 32
  • 5-32 Equity CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT LO 2
  • Slide 33
  • 5-33 Equity ILLUSTRATION 5-17 Classified Report-Form Statement of Financial Position LO 2
  • Slide 34
  • 5-34 Non-Current Liabilities Obligations that a company does not reasonably expect to liquidate within the longer of one year or the normal operating cycle. Three types: Obligations arising from specific financing situations. Obligations arising from the ordinary operations of the company. Obligations that depend on the occurrence or non- occurrence of one or more future events to confirm the amount payable, or the payee, or the date payable. CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT LO 2
  • Slide 35
  • 5-35 Non-Current Liabilities ILLUSTRATION 5-17 Classified Report-Form Statement of Financial Position LO 2
  • Slide 36
  • 5-36 Current Liabilities Obligations that a company generally expects to settle in its normal operating cycle or one year, whichever is longer. Includes: Payables resulting from the acquisition of goods and services. Collections received in advance for the delivery of goods or performance of services. Other liabilities whose liquidation will take place within the operating cycle or one year. CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT LO 2
  • Slide 37
  • 5-37 Current Liabilities ILLUSTRATION 5-17 Classified Report-Form Statement of Financial Position LO 2
  • Slide 38
  • 5-38 Explain the uses and limitations of a statement of financial position. Identify the major classifications of the statement of financial position. Prepare a classified statement of financial position using the report and account formats. Indicate the purpose of the statement of cash flows. 5.Identify the content of the statement of cash flows. 6.Prepare a basic statement of cash flows. 7.Understand the usefulness of the statement of cash flows. 8.Determine additional information requiring note disclosure. 9.Describe the major disclosure techniques for financial statements. After studying this chapter, you should be able to: Statement of Financial Position and Statement of Cash Flows 5 LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Slide 39
  • 5-39 IFRS does not specify the order or format of the items in the statement. Two general forms: Account form Assets on left side Equity and liabilities on right side Report form CLASSIFICATION IN THE STATEMENT Statement of Financial Position Format LO 3
  • Slide 40
  • 5-40 Report Form lists the sections one above the other. Statement of Financial Position Format ILLUSTRATION 5-17 Classified Report-Form Statement of Financial Position LO 3
  • Slide 41
  • 5-41 Explain the uses and limitations of a statement of financial position. Identify the major classifications of the statement of financial position. Prepare a classified statement of financial position using the report and account formats. Indicate the purpose of the statement of cash flows. Identify the content of the statement of cash flows. 6.Prepare a basic statement of cash flows. 7.Understand the usefulness of the statement of cash flows. 8.Determine additional information requiring note disclosure. 9.Describe the major disclosure techniques for financial statements. After studying this chapter, you should be able to: Statement of Financial Position and Statement of Cash Flows 5 LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Slide 42
  • 5-42 An important element of the objective of financial reporting is assessing the amounts, timing, and uncertainty of cash flows. IASB requires the statement of cash flows (also called the cash flow statement). STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS LO 4
  • Slide 43
  • 5-43 Primary Purpose: To provide relevant information about the cash receipts and cash payments of an enterprise during a period. Statement provides answers to the following questions: 1.Where did the cash come from? 2.What was the cash used for? 3.What was the change in the cash balance? STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS LO 4
  • Slide 44
  • 5-44 Explain the uses and limitations of a statement of financial position. Identify the major classifications of the statement of financial position. Prepare a classified statement of financial position using the report and account formats. Indicate the purpose of the statement of cash flows. Identify the content of the statement of cash flows. 6.Prepare a basic statement of cash flows. 7.Understand the usefulness of the statement of cash flows. 8.Determine additional information requiring note disclosure. 9.Describe the major disclosure techniques for financial statements. After studying this chapter, you should be able to: Statement of Financial Position and Statement of Cash Flows 5 LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Slide 45
  • 5-45 Transactions that enter into the determination of net income Operating Activities Making and collecting loans and acquiring and disposing of investments and property, plant, and equipment Investing Activities Transactions involving liability and equity items Financing Activities Content and Format STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS LO 5
  • Slide 46
  • 5-46 CONTENT AND FORMAT ILLUSTRATION 5-19 Cash Inflows and Outflows LO 5
  • Slide 47
  • 5-47 Explain the uses and limitations of a statement of financial position. Identify the major classifications of the statement of financial position. Prepare a classified statement of financial position using the report and account formats. Indicate the purpose of the statement of cash flows. Identify the content of the statement of cash flows. 6.Prepare a basic statement of cash flows. 7.Understand the usefulness of the statement of cash flows. 8.Determine additional information requiring note disclosure. 9.Describe the major disclosure techniques for financial statements. After studying this chapter, you should be able to: Statement of Financial Position and Statement of Cash Flows 5 LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Slide 48
  • 5-48 Information obtained from several sources: 1.comparative statements of financial position, 2.current income statement, and 3.selected transaction data. Sources of Information Preparation of the Statement of Cash Flows STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS LO 6
  • Slide 49
  • 5-49 Preparation of Statement of Cash Flows Illustration: On January 1, 2015, in its first year of operations, Telemarketing Inc. issued 50,000 ordinary shares of $1 par value for $50,000 cash. The company rented its office space, furniture, and telecommunications equipment and performed marketing services throughout the first year. In June 2015, the company purchased land for $15,000. Illustration 5-20 shows the companys comparative statements of financial position at the beginning and end of 2015. LO 6
  • Slide 50
  • 5-50 ILLUSTRATION 5-20 ILLUSTRATION 5-21
  • Slide 51
  • 5-51 Preparing the Statement of Cash Flows Determine: 1.Net cash provided by (or used in) operating activities. 2.Net cash provided by (or used in) investing and financing activities. 3.Determine the change (increase or decrease) in cash during the period. 4.Reconcile the change in cash with the beginning and the ending cash balances. Preparation of Statement of Cash Flows LO 6
  • Slide 52
  • 5-52 Net cash provided by operating activities Excess of cash receipts over cash payments from operating activities. Determined by converting net income on an accrual basis to a cash basis. Add to or deduct from net income those items in the income statement that do not affect cash. Requires an analysis of the current years income statement, comparative statements of financial position and selected transaction data. Preparing the Statement of Cash Flows LO 6
  • Slide 53
  • 5-53 Cash provided by operating activities ILLUSTRATION 5-22 ILLUSTRATION 5-20 Increase in accounts receivable reflects a non-cash increase of $41,000 in revenues. LO 6
  • Slide 54
  • 5-54 Cash provided by operating activities ILLUSTRATION 5-22 ILLUSTRATION 5-20 Increase in accounts payable reflects a non-cash increase of $12,000 in expenses. LO 6
  • Slide 55
  • 5-55 Telemarketing Inc.s investing and financing activities. Purchased land for $15,000. Issued o rdinary shares for $50,000. Paid $14,000 in dividends. Preparing the Statement of Cash Flows LO 6
  • Slide 56
  • 5-56 ILLUSTRATION 5-23 Purchased land for $15,000 (Investing) Investing and Financing Activities LO 6
  • Slide 57
  • 5-57 ILLUSTRATION 5-23 Issued ordinary shares for $50,000 (Financing) Investing and Financing Activities LO 6
  • Slide 58
  • 5-58 ILLUSTRATION 5-23 Paid $14,000 in dividends (Financing) Investing and Financing Activities LO 6
  • Slide 59
  • 5-59 BE 5-12: Keyser Beverage Company reported the following items in the most recent year. Activity Required: Determine if each item should be classified as an operating, investing, or financing activity. Preparation of Statement of Cash Flows Net income $40,000Operating Dividends paid5,000Financing Increase in accounts receivable10,000Operating Increase in accounts payable7,000Operating Purchase of equipment8,000Investing Depreciation expense4,000Operating Issue of notes payable20,000Financing LO 6
  • Slide 60
  • 5-60 BE 5-12 Net income of $40,000 LO 6
  • Slide 61
  • 5-61 BE 5-12 Dividends paid $5,000 LO 6
  • Slide 62
  • 5-62 BE 5-12 Increase in accounts receivable of $10,000 LO 6
  • Slide 63
  • 5-63 BE 5-12 Purchase equipment for $8,000 LO 6
  • Slide 64
  • 5-64 BE 5-12 Increase in accounts payable of $7,000 LO 6
  • Slide 65
  • 5-65 BE 5-12 Proceeds from notes payable of $20,000 LO 6
  • Slide 66
  • 5-66 BE 5-12 Depreciation expense of $4,000 LO 6
  • Slide 67
  • 5-67 BE 5-12 LO 6
  • Slide 68
  • 5-68 In preparing a statement of cash flows, which of the following transactions would be considered an investing activity? a. Sale of equipment at book value b. Sale of merchandise on credit c. Declaration of a cash dividend d. Issuance of bonds payable. Preparation of Statement of Cash Flows Question LO 6
  • Slide 69
  • 5-69 Reported in a separate note to the financial statements. Examples include: Issuance of ordinary shares to purchase assets. Conversion of bonds into ordinary shares. Issuance of debt to purchase assets. Exchanges on long-lived assets. Significant Non-Cash Activities Preparation of Statement of Cash Flows LO 6
  • Slide 70
  • 5-70 ILLUSTRATION 5-24 Comprehensive Statement of Cash Flows
  • Slide 71
  • 5-71 Explain the uses and limitations of a statement of financial position. Identify the major classifications of the statement of financial position. Prepare a classified statement of financial position using the report and account formats. Indicate the purpose of the statement of cash flows. Identify the content of the statement of cash flows. 6.Prepare a basic statement of cash flows. 7.Understand the usefulness of the statement of cash flows. 8.Determine additional information requiring note disclosure. 9.Describe the major disclosure techniques for financial statements. After studying this chapter, you should be able to: Statement of Financial Position and Statement of Cash Flows 5 LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Slide 72
  • 5-72 Without cash, a company will not survive. Cash flow from Operations: High amount - able to generate sufficient cash from operations to pay its bills without further borrowing. Low or negative amount - may have to borrow or issue equity securities. Usefulness of Statement of Cash Flows LO 7
  • Slide 73
  • 5-73 Ratio indicates the ability to pay off current liabilities from operations. Ratio near 1:1 is good. Financial Liquidity Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities Average Current Liabilities Current Cash Debt Coverage Ratio = ILLUSTRATION 5-26 Usefulness of Statement of Cash Flows LO 7
  • Slide 74
  • 5-74 Ratio indicates the ability to repay liabilities from net cash provided by operating activities, without having to liquidate assets employed in operations. Average Total Liabilities Cash Debt Coverage Ratio = Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities ILLUSTRATION 5-27 Usefulness of Statement of Cash Flows Financial Flexibility LO 7
  • Slide 75
  • 5-75 Indicates the amount of discretionary cash flow available. Free Cash Flow ILLUSTRATION 5-29 Usefulness of Statement of Cash Flows LO 7
  • Slide 76
  • 5-76 The current cash debt coverage ratio is often used to assess a. financial flexibility. b. liquidity. c. profitability. d. solvency. Usefulness of Statement of Cash Flows Question LO 7
  • Slide 77
  • 5-77 Explain the uses and limitations of a statement of financial position. Identify the major classifications of the statement of financial position. Prepare a classified statement of financial position using the report and account formats. Indicate the purpose of the statement of cash flows. Identify the content of the statement of cash flows. 6.Prepare a basic statement of cash flows. 7.Understand the usefulness of the statement of cash flows. 8.Determine additional information requiring note disclosure. 9.Describe the major disclosure techniques for financial statements. After studying this chapter, you should be able to: Statement of Financial Position and Statement of Cash Flows 5 LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Slide 78
  • 5-78 IFRS requires that a complete set of financial statements be presented annually. Comprised of the following: 1.Statement of financial position at the end of the period; 2.Statement of comprehensive income for the period to be presented either as: a)One single statement of comprehensive income. b)A separate income statement and statement of comprehensive income. 3.Statement of changes in equity; 4.Statement of cash flows; and 5.Notes, comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION LO 8
  • Slide 79
  • 5-79 Accounting Policies Specific principles, bases, conventions, rules, and practices applied in preparing and presenting financial information. First note generally titled, Summary of Significant Accounting Policies. Notes to the Financial Statements ADDITIONAL INFORMATION LO 8
  • Slide 80
  • 5-80 Notes to the Financial Statements ILLUSTRATION 5-30 Accounting Policies Inventory ILLUSTRATION 5-31 Accounting Policies Intangible Asset LO 8
  • Slide 81
  • 5-81 IFRS requires specific disclosures. Examples include: Notes to the Financial Statements Additional Notes to the Financial Statements 1.Items of property, plant, and equipment are disaggregated into classes such as land, buildings, etc., in the notes, with related accumulated depreciation reported where applicable. LO 8
  • Slide 82
  • 5-82 Additional Notes ILLUSTRATION 5-36 Reconciliation Schedule for Property, Plant, and Equipment LO 8
  • Slide 83
  • 5-83 IFRS requires specific disclosures. Examples include: Notes to the Financial Statements Additional Notes to the Financial Statements 2.Receivables are disaggregated into amounts receivable from trade customers, receivables from related parties, prepayments, and other amounts. LO 8
  • Slide 84
  • 5-84 Additional Notes ILLUSTRATION 5-34 Maturity Analysis for Receivables
  • Slide 85
  • 5-85 IFRS requires specific disclosures. Examples include: Additional Notes Additional Notes to the Financial Statements 3.Inventories are disaggregated into classifications such as merchandise, production supplies, work in process, and finished goods. 4.Provisions are disaggregated into provisions for employee benefits and other items. LO 8
  • Slide 86
  • 5-86 Explain the uses and limitations of a statement of financial position. Identify the major classifications of the statement of financial position. Prepare a classified statement of financial position using the report and account formats. Indicate the purpose of the statement of cash flows. Identify the content of the statement of cash flows. 6.Prepare a basic statement of cash flows. 7.Understand the usefulness of the statement of cash flows. 8.Determine additional information requiring note disclosure. 9.Describe the major disclosure techniques for financial statements. After studying this chapter, you should be able to: Statement of Financial Position and Statement of Cash Flows 5 LEARNING OBJECTIVES
  • Slide 87
  • 5-87 Parenthetical Explanations Techniques of Disclosure ILLUSTRATION 5-37 Parenthetical Disclosure of Shares Issued Parenthetical explanation is an advantage over a note because it brings the additional information into the body of the statement where readers will less likely overlook it. LO 9
  • Slide 88
  • 5-88 Cross-Reference and Contra Items Techniques of Disclosure Companies cross-reference a direct relationship between an asset and a liability on the statement of financial position. ILLUSTRATION 5-38 Cross-Referencing and Contra Items LO 9
  • Slide 89
  • 5-89 Fair Presentation Other Guidelines IAS No. 1 indicates that it is important that assets and liabilities, and income and expense, be reported separately. It is proper to measure assets net of valuation allowances, such as allowance for doubtful accounts or inventory net of impairment. OffsettingConsistency ADDITIONAL INFORMATION LO 9
  • Slide 90
  • 5-90 Fair Presentation Other Guidelines The Conceptual Framework indicates that companies should follow consistent principles and methods from one period to the next. Accounting policies must be consistently applied for similar transactions and events unless an IFRS requires a different policy. OffsettingConsistency ADDITIONAL INFORMATION LO 9
  • Slide 91
  • 5-91 Other Guidelines Faithful representation of transactions and events using the definitions and recognition criteria in the Conceptual Framework. Presumed that the use of IFRS with appropriate disclosure results in financial statements that are fairly presented. OffsettingConsistency ADDITIONAL INFORMATION LO 9 Fair Presentation
  • Slide 92
  • 5-92 STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AND STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS As in IFRS, the statement of financial position and the statement of cash flows are required statements for U.S. GAAP. In addition, the content and presentation of a U.S. GAAP statement of financial position and cash flow statement are similar to those used for IFRS. GLOBAL ACCOUNTING INSIGHTS
  • Slide 93
  • 5-93 Relevant Facts Following are the key similarities and differences between U.S. GAAP and IFRS related to the statement of financial position. Similarities Both U.S. GAAP and IFRS allow the use of the title balance sheet or statement of financial position. IFRS recommends but does not require the use of the title statement of financial position rather than balance sheet. Both U.S. GAAP and IFRS require disclosures about (1) accounting policies followed, (2) judgments that management has made in the process of applying the entitys accounting policies, and (3) the key assumptions and estimation uncertainty that could result in a material adjustment. Comparative prior period information must be presented and financial statements must be prepared annually. GLOBAL ACCOUNTING INSIGHTS
  • Slide 94
  • 5-94 Relevant Facts Similarities U.S. GAAP and IFRS require presentation of non-controlling interests in the equity section of the statement of financial position. Differences U.S. GAAP follows the same guidelines as presented in the chapter for distinguishing between current and noncurrent assets and liabilities. However, under U.S. GAAP, public companies must follow U.S. SEC regulations, which require specific line items. In addition, specific U.S. GAAP mandates certain forms of reporting for this information. IFRS requires a classified statement of financial position except in very limited situations. GLOBAL ACCOUNTING INSIGHTS
  • Slide 95
  • 5-95 Relevant Facts Differences Under U.S. GAAP cash is listed first, but under IFRS it is many times listed last. That is, under IFRS, current assets are usually listed in the reverse order of liquidity than under U.S. GAAP. U.S. GAAP has many differences in terminology that you will notice in this textbook. One example is the use of common stock under U.S. GAAP, which is referred to as share capitalordinary under IFRS. Use of the term reserve is discouraged in U.S. GAAP, but there is no such prohibition in IFRS. GLOBAL ACCOUNTING INSIGHTS
  • Slide 96
  • 5-96 About The Numbers The order of presentation in the statement of financial position differs between U.S. GAAP and IFRS. As indicated in the following table, U.S. companies generally present current assets, non-current assets, current and non-current liabilities, and shareholders equity. In addition, within the current asset and liability classifications, items are presented in order of liquidity. GLOBAL ACCOUNTING INSIGHTS
  • Slide 97
  • 5-97 On the Horizon The IASB and the FASB are working on a project to converge their standards related to financial statement presentation. A key feature of the proposed framework is that each of the statements will be organized, in the same format, to separate an entitys financing activities from its operating and investing activities and, further, to separate financing activities into transactions with owners and creditors. Thus, the same classifications used in the statement of financial position would also be used in the statement of comprehensive income and the statement of cash flows. GLOBAL ACCOUNTING INSIGHTS
  • Slide 98
  • 5-98 LO 10 Identify the major types of financial ratios and what they measure. USING RATIOS TO ANALYZE PERFORMANCE Qualitative information can be gathered from financial statements by examining relationships between items on the statements and identifying trends in these relationships. APPENDIX 5A RATIO ANALYSISA REFERENCE
  • Slide 99
  • 5-99 USING RATIOS TO ANALYZE PERFORMANCE APPENDIX 5A RATIO ANALYSISA REFERENCE ILLUSTRATION 5A-1 A Summary of Financial Ratios LO 10
  • Slide 100
  • 5-100 USING RATIOS TO ANALYZE PERFORMANCE APPENDIX 5A RATIO ANALYSISA REFERENCE LO 10 ILLUSTRATION 5A-1 A Summary of Financial Ratios
  • Slide 101
  • 5-101 USING RATIOS TO ANALYZE PERFORMANCE APPENDIX 5A RATIO ANALYSISA REFERENCE LO 10 ILLUSTRATION 5A-1 A Summary of Financial Ratios
  • Slide 102
  • 5-102 Copyright 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction or translation of this work beyond that permitted in Section 117 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act without the express written permission of the copyright owner is unlawful. Request for further information should be addressed to the Permissions Department, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. The purchaser may make back-up copies for his/her own use only and not for distribution or resale. The Publisher assumes no responsibility for errors, omissions, or damages, caused by the use of these programs or from the use of the information contained herein. COPYRIGHT

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