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2010 Texas Independence Day Celebration Program Book, San Benito, Texas

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  • San Benito CISD Celebrates

    Jack Ayoub Tootie Madden Mike Frasier Adrian Salazar

    TEXASHERITAGEINDEPENDENCECELEBRATIONASSOCIATION

    INC.

    Board members of the association which made the Texas Independence

    Day Celebration possible include: Fred

    Garza, Jack Ayoub, Ron Rogers, Shon Gonzales, Tootie Madden, Sarah

    Williams, Adrian Salazar, Ruben

    Cordova, Mike Frasier, and more.

  • Aparade of horseback riders, a reenact-ment of the Battle of the Alamo, and family-friendly history activities will take place during a two-day event commemorating the 174th anniversary of Texas Independence.

    San Benitos Texas Independence Day Celebra-tion, now in its second year, will be held Feb. 26-27, 2010 on the Plaza de San Benito grounds, located on 210 E. Heywood St.

    Celebrate. Education of Texas Independence begins at 9 a.m. on Feb. 26 with the Texas History Symposium. The symposium will feature Texas historians Dr. Jesus de la Teja, editor of the memoirs of Juan Seguin; author of De Leon: A Tejano Family History Dr. Ana Carolina Castillo

    A Military History.Symposium participants will receive six hours of continu-

    ing education credits; an autographed copy of the book, Tejano Leadership in Revolu-tionary Texas; as well as a historical dem-onstration of period cooking.

    The celebration will begin Feb. 27 at 11 a.m. with a parade led by several organizations of horseback riders. At

    re-enactments of the battle of the Alamo and battle

    enactors with their equipment and weapons. The day will also include family-fun events

    good ol Texas storytelling. Participants will

    wagon, explore a Native American teepee, browse displays of tools and leather goods, and observe demonstrations that give a historical account of early life in the Rio Grande Valley Re-gion. Texas food by local non-profit vendors will be offered.

    dence Day Celebration in San Benito, call Fred Garza at (956)

    245-6980.

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    Crimm; and Dr. Stephen L. Hardin, author of Texian Iliad: A Military History.

    Symposium participants will receive six hours of continu-ing education credits; an autographed copy of thebook, Tejano Leadership in Revolu-tionary Texas; as well asa historical dem-onstrationof period cooking.

    For information about the Texas Indepen-dence Day Celebration n ini S Sa BBenito,call Frededddd GGaraa zazz at t (956565 )

    245-6980.

    San Benito

    Texas Independence Day Celebration

  • William Travis, Davy Crockett, and James Bowie these are names well-known to ev-eryone familiar with the legendary Battle of the Alamo.But Dr. Frank de la Teja wants people to know the

    names of a few Tejanos (Mexican-Americans who lived in Texas) who were also instrumental in achieving Texas independence. As chairman of the history department at Texas State University in San Marcos and the first state historian appointed by Gov. Rick Perry, de la Teja said it is his mission to educate Mexican-Americans today of the role Tejanos played in the development of the state of Texas. And what better venue to stress such an agenda than at the Texas Independence Day celebration in San

    Benito from Feb. 26-27.

    For instance, Juan Martin Veramendi: If anyone remem-bers him, its because he was the father of Ursula Ve-ramendi, who married Jim Bowie. Thats the only reason

    hes remembered, de la Teja said. But Veramendi was a native of San Antonio and a businessman as well as a politician. He became the governor of the Mexican state of Coahuila y Tejas (Texas) from 1832 until 1833, when he died of cholera. Thats just one individual whos one of the most important political figures of the early 1830s, because he was a staunch defender of the Anglo-American settlement.

    De la Teja often focuses on Tejanos from 1821-1836, which was during the period of Mexican rule leading up to the Texas Revolution.

    The emphasis and why I make these presentations is the fact that we have a group of men who

    have largely been forgotten. The only Tejanos we normal-ly remember are Juan Seguin and Jose Antonio Navarro, de la Teja said. We often dont think of Tejanos as hav-ing important political leadership roles during that time, and yet we did.

    De la Teja will speak at the Texas History Symposium, just one of the festivities to be held at San Benitos Second Annual Texas Independence Day Celebration, at 9 a.m. on Feb. 26.

    De la Teja, editor of the memoirs of Juan Seguin, is also the author of numerous books and essays on the his-tory of Texas.

    First-ever State Historian makes second appearance at celebration

    Dr. Frank de la Teja

    Dr. FRANK DE LA TEJA

    Dr. DE LA TEJA SPEAKS

  • In addition to authoring several books on Texas History, Dr. Stephen L. Hardin acted as historical advisor for the John Lee Han-cock film, The Alamo. Additionally, he is the editor of Lone Star: The Republic of Texas, 1836-1846 (1998) and is the author of more than a dozen scholarly articles enjoyed by readers on both sides of the Atlantic.

    When not engaged in the classroom, he serves as an on-air commentator, appearing on such varied venues as the A&E Network, the History Channel, and NBCs Today show. Dr. Hardin is an inductee of the Texas Institute of Letters, an admiral in the Texas Navy, a member of Western Writers of America, and a Fellow of the Texas State Historical Association.

    Hardin is a professor of history at McMurry University in Abilene, Texas.

    He is the author of The Texas Rangers (1991), the award-winning Texian Iliad: A Military History of the Texas Revolution (1994), The Alamo 1836: Santa Annas Texas Campaign (2001), and Texian Macabre: The Melancholy

    Tale of a Hanging in Early Houston (2007). Addi-tionally, he is the editor of Lone Star: The Republic of Texas, 1836-1846 (1998) and is the author of more than a dozen scholarly articles enjoyed by readers on both sides of the Atlantic. Recently, Texian Iliad achieved distinction as a Basic Texas Book when bibliophile Mike Cox included it in More Basic Texas Books.

    When not engaged in the classroom, he serves as an on-air commentator, appearing on such varied

    venues as the A&E Network, the History Channel, and NBCs TODAY show. Distinguished for his readable style and accessible approach to history, Dr. Hardin is an induct-ee of the Texas Institute of Letters, an admiral in the Texas Navy, a member of Western Writers of America, a Fellow of the Texas State Historical Association, and acted as his-torical advisor for the John Lee Hancock film The Alamo (2004). The Chronicles of Higher Education examined his work on that film in a featured article.

    Dr. Hardin lives in Abilene, Texas, with his wife, Debo-rah, and his children, Walker and Savannah.

    Dr. Ana Carolina Castillo-Crimm is a Min-nie Stevens Piper Professor and winner of the Mary Jon and J.P Bryan Texas His-tory Teacher award. She is a Fellow of the Texas State Historical Association and a member of its board of directors. Her numerous publica-tions include De Len: A Tejano Family History (University of Texas Press, 2004), which has won the Presidio La Baha Award from the Sons of the Republic of Texas, a San Antonio Conservation So-ciety Book Citation, and the Texas Old Missions and Forts Restoration Association Book Award.

    Castillo-Crimm is a professor of history at Sam Houston State Uni-versity. She was born and brought up

    in Mexico City, Mexico and came to the United States in 1963, finishing her BA at the University of Miami, her MA at Texas Tech University before earning her Ph. D. from the University of Texas at Austin with Dr. Nettie Lee Benson in Latin Ameri-can History. She has taught on the high school level for 15 years, and has been at Sam Houston State University for the last 17 years where she has won both local and state-wide teaching awards, including the prestigious Piper Award as one of the best teach-

    ers in Texas. She has published numerous introductions and chapters on Texas women and Hispanics. She is very active on the university campus where she serves on numerous committees and sponsors several student groups. She also remains active on the local, regional and state-wide levels.

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  • Remember the Alamo!The cries will be raised Friday Feb. 26

    to honor Texas history. With their gear in hand, the members of the Black Powder Gang will gather

    the event.

    the kids about history and teach the people about things you dont get from a book.

    costume and shoot off guns haphazardly at each other. In fact, most reenactors

    Cordova and his fellow members round up authentic gear and garb from

    totaled a little over $1,000.They learn and practice battle tactics used by the Texas and Mexican armies,

    and actually take their weapons out to firing ranges to perfect their shoot-ing capabilities. They study history and try to mirror it to keep it alive for the people of the 21st century.

    Texas much like the real Alamo fighters send out handwritten parchment

    Each person comes to the battle field with full 1830s gear from head to toe. They pitch a campsite together; some like Cordova bring their family

    to sing traditional folk songs that the men of the Alamo could have very well sang in the nights leading up to their epic battle.

    hope to inspire pride in their statesmen by reviving Texas history, so people ne

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