200 modern chess traps in the fianchetto openings (gnv64)

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200 Modern Chess Traps in the Fianchetto openingsMo plavercan afford to ignore the new refinements in Fianchetto techniques which are n o w available for the first time

$7-95

Fianchetto chess is here to stay! W i t h the tremendous advance in 'hypermodern' theory during recent years, no player wishing t o hold his o w n in competitive play can afford to ignore the new techniques w h i c h are n o w available. In assembling these 200 traps, the author has made a deep study of systems used by the great original thinkers of the present day Tal, Fisher, Larsen and Penrose. Sparks cari normally be expected to fly w h e n players like these sit d o w n at the board, and n e w snares and pitfalls for the unwary are constantly being revealed in their games. One typical instance is the snare that cost Tal his game against Penrose in the 1960 Chess Olympics at Leipzig (and w h i c h incidentally w a s the only game lost by any Soviet player in the w h o l e t o u r n a m e n t ! ) . This sensational encounter involving the first defeat of a reigning w o r l d champion in the 20th century by a British player, is analysed in the chapter on the Benoni Defence. This book is designed to help the average player chart a safe course t h r o u g h the shoals w h i c h abound in each Fianchetto opening. Every endeavour has been made to restrict the traps given to those discovered during the last t w o decades - except in cases where a really important line dates back earlier - and the original source is recorded only where it seems conclusive that the pitfall in question claimed its first v i c t i m in one particular game.

J. B. HOWSON

Two Hundred Modern Chess Traps in the Fianchetto openings

S O U T H

B R U N S W I C K

A N D

N E W

Y O R K

A. S. BARNES AND COMPANY

1970 J. B. Howson First American edition published 1971 by A. S. Barnes and Co. Inc., Cranbury, New Jersey 08512 Library of Congress Catalogue Card Number: 77-151123

ISBN 0 - 4 9 8 - 0 7 9 1 9 - 8 PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

FOREWORDFianchetto chess is here to stay! W i t h the tremendous a d v a n c e in " h y p e r m o d e r n " theory during recent years, n o player wishing to hold his o w n in competitive play c a n a f f o r d to ignore the n e w techniques w h i c h are n o w available. I n assembling these 200 traps, the author has m a d e a d e e p study of systems used b y four original thinkers of the present d a y T a l , Fischer, Larsen a n d Penrose. Sparks c a n normally be expected to fly w h e n players like these sit d o w n at the b o a r d , a n d n e w pitfalls for the u n w a r y are constantly being revealed in their games. O n e typical instance is the strategical error w h i c h cost T a l his g a m e against Penrose in the i960 Chess O l y m p i c s at L e i p z i g (and w h i c h incidentally was the only g a m e lost b y a n y Soviet player in the whole t o u r n a m e n t ! ) . T h i s sensational encounter, involving the first defeat of a reigning w o r l d c h a m p i o n in the 20th century b y a Briton, is analysed in the chapter on the M o d e r n Benoni Defence. T h i s book is designed to help the average p l a y e r chart a safe course through the shoals w h i c h a b o u n d in each fianchetto opening. E v e r y endeavour has been m a d e to restrict the traps given to those discovered during the last t w o d e c a d e s e x c e p t in cases w h e r e a really important line dates b a c k earlier a n d the original source is recorded w h e r e it seems conclusive that the pitfall in question claimed its first victim in one particular game. H o w e v e r , the question of "first e v e r " is a notoriously difficult one, so apologies are m a d e in a d v a n c e to aggrieved parties w h o m a y find their o w n pet w i n n i n g device (which m a y h a v e g i v e n t h e m g o o d service since the y e a r dot) credited to some grandmaster or other at a later date. T h e author hopes to m a k e readers familiar with the types of t r a p c h a r a c teristic of fianchetto play, not just w i t h specific variations. V e r y often a p l a y e r c a n sense the possibility of a h i d d e n snare if the type of position involved is well k n o w n to him.

In addition, the book can be u s e d to develop tactical ability. J u s t cover the P L A Y N O W C O N T I N U E D text below each d i a g r a m , a n d t r y to w o r k out j u s t w h y the last m o v e w a s a m i s t a k e . Choose a line of y o u r own, and see h o w near y o u can get to the correct refutation before reading on.

CONTENTSQueen's Side pageKING'S INDIAN DEFENCE I

T y p i c a l variation: I P - Q 4 N - K B 3 , 2 P - Q B 4 P - K N 3 , 3 N - Q B 3 B - N 2 , 4 P - K 4 P-Q.3, 5 N - K B 3 O - OGRUNFELD DEFENCE 47

1 P-Q.4 N - K B 3 , 2 P - Q B 4 P - K N 3 ) 3 N - Q B 3 P-Q.4M O D E R N AND O L D BENONI 69

1 P-Q.4 N - K B 3 , 2 P - Q B 4 P - Q B 4QUEEN'S INDIAN DEFENCE 89

1 P-Q.4 N - K B 3 , A P - Q B 4 P -K3, 3 N - K B 3 P - Q N 3NIMZO-INDIAN DEFENCE IOI

1 P-Q.4 N - K B 3 ) 2 P - Q B 4 P - K 3 ; 3 N - Q B 3 B - N 5 J 4 P - K 3 P - Q N 3ENGLISH AND R E T I OPENINGS I I I

1 P - Q B 4 and 2 N - Q B 3 . 1 N - K B 3 and 2 P - Q B 4 K i n g ' s SidePIRC D E F E N C E (INCLUDING R O B A T S C H ) I 25

1 P - K 4 P-Q.3. 1 P - K 4 P - K N 3SICILIAN D E F E N C E 157

1 P-K4 P-QB4 Miscellaneous Budapest D e f e n c e B i r d ' s O p e n i n g C a t a l a n O p e n i n g C e n t r e C o u n t e r Dutch DefenceKing's Indian AttackLarsen/Alekhine DefenceOrangUtan/Sokolsky O p e n i n g S p a s s k y ' s D e f e n c e S p i k e / G r o b ' s A n g r i f f T h r e e Knights G a m e T s c h i g o r i n ' s Defence 175

5

B-K3

KING'S INDIAN DEFENCE T h e prize for the most successful trap of recent times must surely go to Soviet grandmaster Geller, for his w i n against the Polish master A d a m s k i , in r o u n d 9 of the 1968 O l y m p i c s Finals at L u g a n o , a n d his win two rounds later with exactly the same variation against the Danish player H o l m ! T h i s featured a theme peculiar to the K i n g ' s I n d i a n Defence, where Black's K i n g ' s K n i g h t is sacrificed on K 5 .

Position a f t e r 11 P - B 3 ? THE OPENING MOVES WERE:

1 2 3 4 5 6

Adamski Holm P-Q4 P-QB4 N-QB3 P-K4 B-K2 B-N5

Geller N-KB3 P-KN3 B-NaP-Q3

O-O

Designed to put pressure on Black's K R 3 straight a w a y by Q . - Q 2 , etc.

6 .. . 7 QrQ.2 8 N B3 9 O O

QN-Qa P-K4 P-B3 PxP

T a l has shown the right w a y here, in his g a m e against Borisenko, S p a r t a k i a d e 1967, w h i c h continued 9 . . . Q - R 4 , 10 K R - Q . I R-Ki, 11 P - Q . 5 P x P , 1 a N x Q P Q_xQ_, 13 N x N c h B x N , 14 R x Q . BxB, 15 N x B P - B 3 w i t h equality. W h i t e should instead m a k e the best of a b a d j o b b y m o v i n g his Q u e e n again, to QB2.

10 N x P 11 P - B 3 ?

N-B4

PLAY NOW 11 ...

CONTINUED: KNxP! a n d Black either wins a p a w n or gets an o v e r w h e l m i n g position.

For e x a m p l e , Adamski-Geller continued 12 N x N N x N , 13 P x N B x N ch, 14 Q x B Q * B , 15 Q x Q P Q_-K6 ch, 16 R - B 2 B - K 3 , 17 Q B 4 Q x Q , 18 R x Q . Q R - Q . 1 , etc.

KING'S I N D I A N DEFENCE

FOUR

PAWNS

ATTACK

People have got so used to playing an " a u t o m a t i c " . . . P - K 4 in the orthodox 5 B - K 2 (or 5 N - B 3 and 6 B-K.2) line that it is worth pointing out that this immediate advance is not sound against every W h i t e system. In the top diagram, Black has sleepily continued with his usual . . . P - K 4 , thinking that White's previous m o v e makes no difference one w a y or the other. A rude awakening awaits him . . .

Position after 6 . . . P - K 4 ? ? THE OPENING MOVES White 1 PQ4 a P-QB4 3 N-QB3 4 P K4 5 B-Ka 6 B-N5 WERE:

Black N-KB3 P-KN3 B-Na P-Q3 O-O This system, popularised by the Soviet player A v e r b a k h , must be handled with great care by Black. A good sixth move for him is given on the facing page.

6 ...

P-K4??

PLAY NOW

CONTINUES: PxP RxQ BxB and Black must lose at least the exchange.

7 PxP! 8 Q*Q 9 BxN 10 N - Q 5 I

2

NO P QB4

KING'S INDIAN D E F E N C E Probably the best sixth move of all for Black is 6 . . . P - B 4 , which sets in motion an immediate counter attack against the Queen's side weakened by the absence of White's Q B . White has little option but to reply 7 P - Q 5 (7 P x P ? is answered by . . . Q.-R4!, threatening 8 . . . N x K P ) , and the game can continue 7 . . . P - Q R 3 , 8 P - Q R 4 ! Q - R 4 , etc. I f W h i t e omits the important advance of the Q R P , and plays a developing move instead (say, 8 N - K B 3 ? ) , he soon gets into hot water.

Position after 8 N - K B 3 ? PLAY NOW CONTINUES:

P-N4!9 PxP 10 Q - B a PxP 10 B x P permits the neat riposte . . . N x K P ! , 11 N x N Q.-R4 ch, etc., with advantage to Black.

1011 N - Q i 12 Q x N P 3 O - O 14 NxN

P-N 5 P-N6!NxKP NxB

P-K4!

with a fine game for Black.

3

KING'S INDIAN DEFENCE

WITH WHITE F I A N C H E T T O Here, in contrast to the Adamski/ Holm-Geller variation, Black gets into hot water through playing . . . K N x K P . This particular line of the King's Indian (8 . . . R - K i and 9 . . . PxP) offers Black very little choice of moves until well into the middlegame, so masters w h o like to get moving early on usually play 8 . . . P - B 3 and 9 . . . Q.-R4 or N 3 instead. T a l , for example, has had m u c h success with both these lines.

Position after 12 . . . K N x P ? THE OPENING MOVES WhiteP-Q4

WERE:

P-QB4 P-KN3 B-Na N-KB3 O-O 8 P-K4