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Principles & Routines of Whole Group Instruction

Core Instructional StrategiesAUDII 2014Comprehensible InputChecking for UnderstandingModeling CycleStudent Engagement

+FrameworkPurposeWhy are we learning this?ArticulationClear definition of each strategy and what it is and what it is notToolbox of 3 5 strategies that if implemented activate the targeted strategy.

Introduction and Objectives+Group ActivityWhat do good teachers do to effectively instruct students?Discussion in groups of 4-+3 minutes3Videohttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxPVyieptwA+Lets watch the three following video clips and reflect on the ideas that you have shared in your groups.Non-example4Videohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pIk9qrMZHXM+Example5Videohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pIk9qrMZHXM+Lower Grade example6Videohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSQOnd5x1RA+Upper grade example.7Compare and Contrast Activity

What were the three teaching practices that most differentiated the first example from the second two examples?Write each down on a post-it note and discuss them with your partner. +5 minutes8

In the DLI instructional setting, we consider these six core instructional strategies to be the backbone of effective instruction. 9Core Instructional StrategiesAUDII 2014Comprehensible InputChecking for UnderstandingModeling CycleStudent Engagement

Comprehensible InputModeling CycleChecking for UnderstandingStudent Engagement+Today we are going to focus of four of the six core instructional strategies: Comprehensible Input; Modeling Cycle, Checking for Understanding; and Student Engagement.10Comprehensible Input

+What key ideas do you remember from Mimis presentation about Comprehensible Input? Turn to your partner and share.

This morning we are going to review what Comprehensible Input is, but more importantly we are going to identify and discuss strategies that we can use to ensure that our instruction is comprehensible.11Comprehensible InputDefinition: The ability to make content and language understandable and accessible to students.Toolbox Strategies:Visual SupportContextualizationAdapted Language Use+Choral read the definition: Lets all read the definition of Comprehensible Input on the count of e. 1,2,3..

The three essential category of strategies for making input comprehensible that we want to make sure that you have or can add to your toolbox today are:Visual support, Contextualization and Adapted language Use.

12Comprehensible InputVideo #1

+Lets watch the following video and be ready to identify the topic of the presentation and at least two key points to share with your partner.

Process their experiences by asking 1-2 participants to paraphrase what their partner shared. How did you feel watching this video, knowing the expectation of the assignment?13Comprehensible InputVISUAL SUPPORT

Definition: Matching sound with meaning

Toolbox Strategies:Gestures and body languagePictures and objects (realia)VideosTotal Physical Response (TPR) +CATEGORY The Visual Support category can be activated through the following strategies:

Gestures and body language-Model (head, shoulders, knees and toes song)Pictures and objects-video exampleTPR-Model (I touch the apple. I feel the apple. I smell the apple, I taste the apple.14Comprehensible InputCONTEXTUALIZATION

Definition: Provide multiple, meaningful, repeated exposure to targeted words, concepts and skills in a variety of contextualized ways.

Toolbox Strategies:Preview materialStorytellingSongs and chants+If we want to capitalize on the principle of contextualization to enhance student access to our instruction, what must we do? Choral read: Lets read the definition together when I snap my fingers provide students with multiple, meaningful, repeated exposure to targeted words, concepts and skills in a variety of contextualized ways

Here are three strategies from the Contextualization toolbox. When I read each, show me with a thumb-up, Thumb-side, Thumb down to show me how much you already use these strategies in your practice?

Lets watch the following video and lets identify which of the Contextualization toolbox strategies listed here are used by the teacher.15Video

+Turn to your partner and share the strategies you noticed the teacher using. Call one person from each table to share (3-4 tabes)16Comprehensible InputLANGUAGEDefinition: Caretaker Speech

Toolbox Strategies:Complexity of speechRateEnunciationPredictability

+What do we mean by caretaker speech?

Model: Complexity of Speech, Rate, Enunciation, give example of predictable speech (phrases used daily-for classroom routines). Predictable text books, such as as Brown Bear, Brown Bear

17Comprehensible InputWithout comprehensible input, acquisition of the immersion language is significantly compromised!+Choral Read-On two snaps, lets read together. Ready, snap, snap,,,,18Guided PracticeCooperative & Orally Interactive Independent PracticeClosing (re-visit Learning Objectives)

Introduction to New MaterialOpeningComprehensibleComprehensibleContent ObjectiveLanguage ObjectiveModeling CycleEngagementCognitiveAll Students ParticipateEngagementEngagementTeacher DoesTeacher & StudentStudent & StudentAll Students Participate All Students ParticipateCognitiveCognitiveAll students ParticipateSentence Frames are UsedContent is AppliedOrally InteractiveOrally InteractiveOrally InteractiveWhen is comprehensible input most critical within the instructional framework? Why?

Turn & Talk with a Partner 19Modeling Cycle

+Modeling CycleDefinition: Means of a teacher showing a child what we want them to know and be able to do and providing them four opportunities to show them what the expected outcome is.

+Video

+Partner ActivityWith a partner, identify and write the 4 opportunities used by the teacher to model what the students were expected to know and do.+23Modeling CycleI Do, We Do, You Do, You All DoTeacher DoesTeacher & student DoStudent and Student DoAll Students Do

+Participants self-correctCandy treats for those who get it right! 24Modeling cycle is the bridge between learning to and doing to show that we know.

+Choral read on three finger-snaps..25Guided PracticeCooperative & Orally Interactive Independent PracticeClosing (re-visit Learning Objectives)

Introduction to New MaterialOpeningComprehensibleComprehensibleContent ObjectiveLanguage ObjectiveModeling CycleEngagementCognitiveAll Students ParticipateEngagementEngagementTeacher DoesTeacher & StudentStudent & StudentAll Students Participate All Students ParticipateCognitiveCognitiveAll students ParticipateSentence Frames are UsedContent is AppliedOrally InteractiveOrally InteractiveOrally InteractiveWhat facets of the instructional framework does the modeling cycle always follows and precedes?26Student Engagement

+Student EngagementDefinition: Ensuring that ALL students are cognitively engaged ALL the time by providing Opportunities to Respond (OTR) through different modalities:VisualPhysicalCognitiveOral ** EVERY opportunity in an immersion classroom should be paired with oral responses)

+Why should every opportunity in an immersion classroom be paired with oral responses?

Turn to a partner and discuss.

1-2 minutes28Visual ResponseToolbox Strategies:White BoardsResponse Cards/Response SystemsPre-printed, Write-on, Cover part, Color Cards, PicturesThumbs up/Thumbs down

+Model using white boards, response cards, Thumbs up/thumbs down.29Physical ResponseToolbox Strategies:Actions (TPR)Move to the Answer Four Corners, Opinion lines, Stand on the AnswerSit Down/Stand Up+Model TPR

Move to the Answer-Display different cereal boxes around the room and ask a group of participants to stand by the cereal they prefer. Discuss with your group why this particular cereal is your favorite.

Four corners will be modeled later in the session.

Opinion Lines-Participants form a line responding to a question: Is chocolate the best drink? Participant form a line with those that think chocolate is the best drink on one end and those that strongly disagree on the other end. Fold the line and have students with differing opinions on a topic share their views.

Stand up/Sit down- stand up if you like dogs, cats, cows, horses, etc.30Cognitive ResponseToolbox Strategy:Think Time (3-5 seconds)

+Think time should always follow a question.31Oral ResponseToolbox Strategies:Choral ResponsesTurn & Talk/Tell a Partner Teach-teachMirrorBlow it away!Students blow the answer in their hands then say it out loud as it flies through the air.

+In the next video we see the teacher using three very effective oral engagement strateies:

Teach/teach or also known as Teach/OKMirrorBlow it away!

32Oral Strategies Videoshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaweXw03kQI+Lets watch a video where the teachers uses three effective oral strategies:Teach-teach or also know as Teach-OKMirrorBlow it away!33Activity Four TownsLook at the engagement strategy on your slip.Decide if your strategy requires a physical (P), visual (V), oral (O), or cognitive (C) response.Move to the appropriate town and tell the others why you should live in that town.Label strategies on handout.

+34Activity Practice and ApplicationDesign engagement strategies that meet the criteria and are appropriate to the learning objective and activity assigned to your group.+35Engagement Strategies/Language OutputIf you do not have them use the immersion language they wont Get It!+Choral read when I ring the bell 36Guided PracticeCooperative & Orally Interactive Independent PracticeClosing (re-visit Learning Objectives)

Introduction to New MaterialOpeningComprehensibleComprehensibleContent ObjectiveLanguage ObjectiveModeling CycleEngagementCognitiveAll Students ParticipateEngagementEngagementTeacher DoesTeacher & StudentStudent & StudentAll Students Participate All Students ParticipateCognitiveCognitiveAll students ParticipateSentence Frames are UsedContent is AppliedOrally InteractiveOrally InteractiveOrally InteractiveDuring what phases of instruction is engagement activated in the instructional framework?37Checking for Understanding+Checking for UnderstandingDefinition: Strategies that are used to elicit evidence that the student is understanding the language and content for the purpose of Toolbox Strategies:Monitoring student progressVisual, Physical and Oral OTRS (opportunities to Respond)Informing instructionVisual, Physical and Oral OTRS (opportunities to Respond+Notice that the strategies for checking for understanding are the same as Engagement (or OTRs). What is the relationship between the two? Turn and talk with a partner.

Difference between OTR and Check for Understanding:OTR is for the benefit of the studentCheck for Understanding is for the benefit of the teacher to inform instruction

39How do we elicit evidence of student content and language understanding?+Scenario of a teacher instructional situationActivity TURN AND TALK

40Checking for Understanding VideoWorking with a partner, identify the four modalities of checking for understandingBased on the student response, what would you do next if you were the teacher? Share and discuss with your partner.+Based on the student response, what would you do next if you were the teacher?Process as group. Ask: What modalities did the teacher in the video use to check for understanding?

41Guided PracticeCooperative & Orally Interactive Independent PracticeClosing (re-visit Learning Objectives)

Introduction to New MaterialOpeningComprehensibleComprehensibleContent ObjectiveLanguage ObjectiveModeling CycleEngagementCognitiveAll Students ParticipateEngagementEngagementTeacher DoesTeacher & StudentStudent & StudentAll Students Participate All Students ParticipateCognitiveCognitiveAll students ParticipateSentence Frames are UsedContent is AppliedOrally InteractiveOrally InteractiveOrally InteractiveWhen is checking for understanding critical within the instructional framework? Turn and talk with a partner. 42Matching ActivityWorking with a partner, categorize the three teaching practices you wrote on the sticky post-it at the beginning of the session.+Expert Group ActivityEach group will provide the rationale (why), a clear definition and model 3-5 strategies from the toolbox for their assigned Core Instructional Strategy.+Assign each group of 4-6, one of the four instructional strage44Lingering Questions

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